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Rader, Geo. B.

     Mr. William Walker, of this city, after an absence of some seven weeks, returned home last Wednesday. He brings with him the remains of Geo. B. Rader, son of Mr. James W. Rader, of this county, who died at Austin, last October. He was a soldier, and belonged to Company I. 17th Regiment, U. S. I.

The Gallipolis Journal
January 21, 1869
Transcribed by Eva Swain Hughes


Rader, Gideon Hamilton

Death of Northup Resident
     G. Ham Rader died at his home at Northup at an early hour this morning July 14, 1917, in his eightieth year following a year's illness with cancer of the stomach.
     He is survived by his widow Victoria and the following children: Mrs. S.E. Gilbert of this city, Mrs. Edythe Howard of Columbus, John at Northup and Charles of Columbus. One sister Mrs. Atlanta Rose of Pliny, W.Va., and brothers John and Emory of this county are left.
     Mr. Rader was a thrifty and prominent farmer who will be missed by all who knew him as he was a man of sterling qualities in every respect.
     The funeral will be held Sunday from his late home at 1 p.m., interment
at Mound Hill cemetery by Myers of Sandfork.

[ Note: He was born January 21, 1837. He was a Squirrel Hunter.]

Gallia times
July 20, 1917
Transcribed by Henny Evans


Ralph, Jonah

Sudden Death of Jonah Ralph
     Jonah Ralph, postmaster at Eno, suddenly died Friday night at his home of heart disease. Was an old soldier and good citizen, aged about 65 years. Besides a wife he leaves three grown sons--Emory, Court and Morris. He was related to Mr. E.P. Ralph of this city and one of the cleverest and kindest hearted men imaginable. He was well known in this city, being a merchant and buying goods here for years.

[Note: He served in Co. A, 91st O.v.I. He is buried in Robinson Cemetery in Morgan
Township,January 25, 1840-August 17,1901.]

Gallipolis Daily Tribune
August 17, 1901
Transcribed by Henny Evans                                                                           Top of Page


Ralph, N. N.

Death of N. N. Ralph
     Tuesday night, March 5, 1895, at 9 o'clock, one of our most venerable and respected citizens, N. N. Ralph, passed away to the unknown future in the 66th year of his age. Mr. Ralph was born at Pomeroy in 1839, and at an early age he learned the trade of a gunsmith, which he followed the remainder of his life.
     In 1848 he was joined in marriage to Miss Julia L. Saxton of that place. By this union there was born nine children, six of whom survive him, all grown to man and womanhood and married with the exception of Harry, who is at home, and was his father's nurse during his bouts of suffering which confined him to his bed for twenty-seven weeks from a disease contracted in the army, in which he served three years from February 2, 1862 to February 2, 1865, and has been practically an invalid since. He resided at Pomeroy until 1872, when he moved to this place and has since been an upright and respected citizen here.
     His funeral services were held at his late residence Thursday at 2 o'clock, by Rev. B. F. Jackson. The burial followed at the Old Cemetery by Wetherholt. Mr. Ralph will be mourned and missed by his family and all who knew him. By his honest and upright character he had endeared himself to all who knew him, and his death leaves a breach that never can be filled. Thus one by one the old soldiers are called to the other side.

[Note: Name is Nial Nye Ralph; served Unit Co. H, 19th Regulars U.S. Infantry; Buried in Pine Street Cemetery; 12/11/1829 - 3/5/1895]

Gallipolis Journal
March 9, 1895
Transcribed by Theresa E. Smith 

Ralph, Nial Nye

     Mr. Nial Nye Ralph, one of our best known citizens, died last Tuesday evening from a complication of troubles, which had confined him to his bed for six months. A widow and several children survive him.
Mr. Ralph was a gunsmith by trade, and resided in this city for about twenty-five years. He came here from Addison.
     The funeral services were conducted at his late home, at the upper end of Front Street, on Thursday afternoon, at two o’clock. Rev. B. F. Jackson officiated, and the burial was at the Old Cemetery.

The Gallipolis Bulletin
Saturday, March 9, 1895
Transcribed by Sandy L. Milliron

Ralph, Nial Nye

Death of N.N. Ralph
     Mr. Nial Nye Ralph, for the past six months confined to his bed with illness from a complication of troubles, and helpless to move about or do anything except on crutches for more than a year, passed into eternal rest a little before 9 o'clock Tuesday evening, March 5th, 1895.
     Mr. Ralph was born at Karr's Run, Meigs county, now the upper end of Pomeroy, Dec. 11, 1828. He was one of seven children, there being six brothers and one sister. Luther V. Ralph of Meigs county, E. Perry Ralph of this city, Mrs. Emma Peck of Missouri, Chas. H. Ralph of Ironton, survive him. Of his own family he leaves a widow, Mrs. Judah L. Saxton Ralph and sons Edmond, Milton, Harrison and Nile McClellan, Mrs. Andrew White and Mrs. James Gibson.
     Mr. Ralph was a gunsmith by trade, and has followed that business ever since coming here twenty-five years ago, and previous to coming here. He first came to Addison from Meigs county, living there 17 years, and enlisted in the regular army here joining the 19th U.S. Regulars under Capt. Welton and served three years, was with Gen. McClelland and the Army of the Potomac, and afterward with Gen. Sherman and was engaged in the battle of Antietam, Chickamauga, Lookout Mountain and other historical engagements, and received a pension for his disabilities contracted in the war, and which were the primary cause of his illness and death. He was a member of the old Grand Army, but found it impossible to attend of late years. He was a republican in politics and a straight, upright man in all his relations with his fellow men, and had friends that were only numbered by those who knew him.
     His funeral services will be conducted at his late home at the upper end of the city Thursday afternoon at 2 o'clock, Rev. B.F. Jackson officiating, his burial following at the Pine street Cemetery, conducted by Wetherholt, under the auspices of the G.A.R. Cadot Post. Mr. Ralph was kindly attended by friends and neighbors during his long and painful illness and they will be ever held in loving remembrance by the  surviving members of his family. His son Harry was a constant nurse and companion at his bedside for twenty-seven weeks, waiting upon him with the greatest care and kindness.

Gallia Daily Tribune
Mar. 6, 1895
Transcribed by Nancy McMillan                                                                           Top of Page


Ralph, Perry

     Perry Ralph, son of Mr. and Mrs. Ansel Ralph, was born Sept. 25, 1846, and departed this life Dec. 20, 1930. aged 84 years, 2 months and 25 days. He was married to Mary Jane Fife Dec. 24, 1868. To them four children were born. His wife and a son 19 years old preceded him in death several years ago. Later he was married to Mrs. Rose Pyles, who is left with his two sons, Edward and Dallas, and daughter, Mrs. James Lemley, to mourn the loss of a kind companion and good father. He also, leaves one brother John, and sister, Mrs. Phoebe Fife, 19 grandchildren, 46 great grandchildren and 3 great-great grandchildren, with a host of relatives and friends.
     He enlisted in the civil war in 1862 in the 91st O.V.I. and was made a prisoner May 9, 1864, at the battle of Cloyd Mountain, Virginia. He was released from Andersonville prison April 18, 1865. Later on he enlisted in the army of Jesus and united with the Second Kyger Freewill Baptist Church, and in all these years he has lived a devoted life for Him. He many times expressed his desire to go and be with Jesus and his loved ones.

Farewell dear grandfather, but not forever,
Wearied with year and worn with pain
Farewell until in some place
We shall behold your face again

[Note: He is buried in Poplar Ridge Cemetery in Cheshire Township.]

Gallipolis Paper
December 1930
Transcribed by Henny Evans


Ralston, James

James Ralston Dead
     James A. Ralston, aged about 82 years, died Thursday at Athens, and the funeral and burial were Friday at Cheshire. He was a son of the late William and Aralie Ralston of Addison township, and had a number of relatives and friends in the upper part of the county. He leaves two brothers and two sisters residing in the west.

[Note: Buried in Bing II Cemetery in Cheshire Township, 1838-1920.]

Gallia Times
February 17, 1920
Transcribed by Henny Evans


Ramsey, James Riley, Capt.

     Capt. Ramsey died suddenly, last Sunday, at the residence of his son, Mr. C.W. Ramsey, of Springfield township. Capt. Ramsey's home was in Nicholas county, W.Va., and he was here on a short visit to his son. During the war he was captain of a company of rangers, which became noted for their boldness.

[Note: He is buried in Mt. Zion Cemetery in Green Township, 1810-October 2, 1887.]

Gallipolis Journal
October 5, 1887
Transcribed by Henny Evans                                                                           Top of Page


Ramsey, Thomas

Death of Thomas Ramsey

     Dr. Thomas Ramsey died on Tuesday, September 18, 1892, at 2:15 p.m., after a long illness. He was 63 years of age and had long been a resident of Gallipolis, where he had many friends. The funeral was under the direction of the G.A.R. Post, and took place on Wednesday at 2:30 p.m. The burial was by Hayward & Son. Dr. Ramsey was the owner of property on Front Street. By his will, made in 1880, this property goes to his adopted son, Mr. P. A. Lyons, of Fort Omaha, Nebraska, a most excellent gentleman and who has shown great affection for Dr. Ramsey in years gone by.

Gallipolis Bulletin
September 17, 1892
Transcribed by Maxine Marshall


Rankin, Vinton A.

Death Of Captain V. A. Rankin
     The flags of the local packets were at half mast today in honor of Captain Vinton A. Rankin, whose life ended at 1 o'clock this Wednesday morning, February 21st, 1900, at his home at Crown City. The funeral services will be conducted Thursday afternoon under the auspices of the G. A. R. and Knights of the Golden Eagle of the Glenwood Lodge.
     Captain Rankin was born June 28, 1843, and was the second child of the late Squire Hiram L. Rankin and Susan Drummond. We believe that all of his brothers and sisters, of whom there four of each, have preceded him.
     He left two sons - Samuel, engineer of this City, and John at home, both married, and one daughter married living some where in the west. His children were by a former wife. By his present wife he left none.
     He was a prominent man in the affairs of Crown City and vicinity, influential and possessed of a respectable amount of property, being probably worth $5000. He had faults as do all, but his reputation was that of a big kind hearted man and good friend, honorable and upright in all his dealings.
     At the beginning of the Civil War he was an engineer on a Mississippi steamer and was captured by the Confederates and made to serve them. Watching his opportunity he escaped from them and joined the 12th U. S. Kentucky Cavalry, and served the Union three years and drew a pension of $12 a month for disabilities. He was a very loyal man and true comrade of the G. A. R., and there was nothing more he enjoyed than his annual reunions of the old soldiers. The circumstances which led up to his death have already been told. May peace be with him for evermore.

[Note: Civil War Soldiers and Sailors web site states he served in the 11th Kentucky Cavalry.]

Gallipolis Daily Tribune
Volume XIII
Number 45
February 21, 1900
Gallipolis, Ohio

Transcribed By: MLT                                                                                      Top of Page


Rarden, Felix

Death of Uncle Felix
     Uncle Felix Rairden, as he was familiarly called, a good inoffensive old citizen, known to most every one in town, aged about 70 years, died Saturday morning at the residence of his niece, Mrs. Roberts at the corner of Second and Olive streets. He was an old soldier of that celebrated regiment the 91st O.V.I. and was laid to rest under the auspices of Cadot Post G.A.R., by Wetherholt in the Pine street cemetery. Uncle Felix was a gardener by occupation, and was an industrious and worthy citizen though of poor and humble circumstances. His life was despaired of several years ago, but by skillful medical attentions and an operation performed by the late Dr. E.W. Parker his life was prolonged to the great gratification of a wide circle of friends. He surely rests among the blest today.

[Note: He was born about 1835 and died April 23, 1904. He was preceded in death by his wife Maggie in 1902.]

Gallipolis Daily Tribune
April 25, 1904
Transcribed by Henny Evans


Ratekin, William Lawrence

     W.L. Ratekin was born February 16, 1835 in Gallia county, Ohio, and died November 14, 1906 of heart disease aged 71 years, 9 months and 14 days. He was married to Mary Anne Vaughn in February, 1858 by Rev. M.D. Vaughn. They came to Rulo in 1864 where they settled on a farm one and a half miles from Rulo and here they lived until about three years ago, when they moved to Rulo.
     To this union were born thirteen children, three of whom were born in Ohio, and the rest on the old home place. The deceased leaves a wife and nine children. They are Marion Ratekin, Hiawatha, Kas., Sarah Fenderburgh, Butte Valley, Cal., Mary Wilhoit, Centralia, Kas., John Ratekin, Eckert, Col., Ida Coupe, James, Will, Minnie and Dan Ratekin, of Rulo. Also one brother, Johnson Ratekin, of Falls City, and one sister, Mary Sanguinette, of Preston.
     Mr. Ratekin was a christian man, having been converted at the age of nineteen and becoming a member of the Baptist church. As there was no church at Rulo of that denomination he united with the Methodist church, but at the time of his death he was a member of the Holiness church. Funeral services were held at Rulo last Wednesday.

[Note: He was buried in Rulo city Cemetery, Rulo, Richardson County, Nebraska. In the History of Richardson
County, Nebraska, it states William L. Ratekin..."During the early part of the Civil War he served as a driver
of a commissary wagon in the Eastern Division and in 1864 came west and proceeded by a steamer to Rulo, where he landed and where he made his permanent home,..." It also states that his daughter Minnie married George Goodale.]

Falls City Tribune (Nebraska)
November 23, 1906
Transcribed by Henny Evans


Ratliff, Julius

Died
October 21st, 1863, Julius Ratlif, in the nineteenth year of his age
     This young man cheerfully responded to his country's call, enlisting in Company E, 56th Regiment O. V. I. He faithfully served his country until the fatigues and privations of camp and soldier life became too severe for his youthful constitution. He was accordingly discharged. But his return home was not attended with the beneficial results which his friends, ardently hoped. Taking suddenly ill, he soon yielded to that solemn fiat which consigns our common humanity to the silent dormontory of the dead.

"Soldier, rest; thy warfare's o'er--
  Dream of battle fields no more."
                               G. W. Isaminger

Gallipolis paper
October 21, 1863
Transcribed by Maxine Marshall


Raynor, Poletus

Poletus Raynor Dead

     Poletus Raynor, a Civil War veteran, died at his home near Rodney on Thursday evening, May 7, 1914, aged 73 years. The funeral services were conducted by Rev. Moffitt Saturday morning, burial being in the Fairfield Church cemetery by undertaker Wetherholt. The deceased is survived by a sister, Mrs. Lucy Whiting of Rodney, and two brothers, Alexander of Oak Hill, and Charles of Rodney. He was a man of high character and will be greatly missed by his numerous friends.

Gallipolis Bulletin
May 14, 1914
Transcribed by Theresa E. Smith                                                                     Top of Page


Reed, Park

Old Soldier Called Suddenly
     Mr. Park Reed, 75, a Civil War veteran, and for many years a resident of Neil avenue, this city, died quite suddenly at his home Friday morning of heart trouble, immediately following his return from a nearby store where he had been making some purchases. Mr. Reed is survived by his wife and one son, Emmett Reed, employed as a painter at the O.H.E. He was a fine old gentleman well liked by all who knew him.

[Note: He served in Co. D, 23rd Ohio Volunteer Infantry. He is buried in Pine Street Cemetery with the dates 1847-1922.]

Gallia Times
September 14, 1922
Transcribed by Henny Evans


Rees/Reese, David

Death of Mr. David Reese
     Mr. David Reese died at his home at Thurman (this) Saturday, Aug. 23, 1924, after a long illness at the age of 80 years. His wife preceded him four years ago. He leaves one daughter, Mrs. Lizzie Evans of Blazer, and four sons, Tom of Columbus, Evan E. and Dan of this city and John at home.
     Mr. Reese was a well known farmer and a Civil War veteran. No funeral arrangements have been made.

[Note: He served in Co. H, 1st Ohio Volunteer Heavy Artillery. He is buried as David Rees at Nebo Cemetery in Perry Township and the dates on his stone are 1844-1924. He died August 23, 1924.]

Gallipolis Weekly Tribune
August 29, 1924
Transcribed by Henny Evans                                                                           Top of Page


Reese (Rees) David

Civil War Veteran Passes Away At Patriot Home
     Mr. David Reese died at his home at Patriot at 8 a.m. Friday, Oct. 22, 1926, at the age of 80 years.
Mr. Reese was a Civil War veteran. He leaves his widow and one daughter, Laura, at home and four sons, Charley of Sand Fork, Tom of Lancaster, O., Floyd of Alridge, Mo., and John of Mudsock. No funeral arrangements have been made.

Gallipolis Daily Tribune
October 22, 1926

Reese Funeral

     The funeral services of Mr. Dave Reese will be held Sunday at 2:00 o'clock at Salem Church near Gage providing a son arrives from Missouri. Otherwise it will be held Monday. Those wishing to attend call C.E. Brumfield Sunday morning for the exact time.

Gallipolis Daily Tribune
October 23, 1926

Funeral of David Reese
     The funeral of Mr. David Reese held Sunday at Salem church near Patriot, was largely attended many going out from town for it. Rev. Riggs had charge of the services and music was given by a quartet composed of Mesars. Dan W. Thomas and Chris Mack and Miss Ruth Sawyers and Mrs. Stanley Huntington. Burial was made in Salem cemetery.

[Note: David Rees served in the Union Army during the Civil War as a Private in Co. C, 194th, O.V.I. from February 14, 1865 until his release in Washington D.C. in October 24, 1865.]

Gallipolis Daily Tribune
October 25, 1926
Transcribed by Lynn Anders


Reese, David J.

David Reese Dead
     David J. Reese, born near Tyn Rhos in Gallia County, Aug. 24, 1843, suffered a paralytic stroke on April 20 and passed away April 22, 1921. He was the eldest of a family of five children, and became a stone mason when he reached adult years.
     He was united in marriage to Miss Anna Jones Dec. 3, 1872, and to them was born one child, John. His wife and child both preceded him in death. Mr. Reese was later united in marriage to Miss Elizabeth Griffith Lloyd. They became the parents of two sons and two daughters, David of Columbus, John and Mrs. Walter Metcalf of Vinton, and Margaret, who died in infancy. One sister, Mrs. E.L. Evans of Kansas, and four grandchildren also survive him.
     He was a member of the church at Tyn Rhos, and was a splendid type of good Christian citizenship. The funeral was held Sunday afternoon at Ebenezer Church conducted by Rev. W.J. Fulton of Rio Grande, burial in charge of H.K. Butler.

[Note: Served in Co. K, 3rd OVI]

Gallia Times
April 28, 1921
Transcribed by Henny Evans


Reese, James

Funeral of James Reese Held Saturday
     The funeral Services for James Reese, civil war veteran, of Rio Grande, who passed away, Jan. 12, at his home in Rio Grande, was held Saturday afternoon at Tyn Rhos and burial was there also. Mr. Reese, who was 85 years old, was a life long resident of this county and the only surviving relative of his immediate family is his son, John, with whom he lived.

[Note: He served in Co. E, 56th Ohio Volunteer Infantry. The name is spelled Rees on his tombstone.]

Gallipolis Daily Tribune
January 16, 1928
Transcribed by Henny Evans                                                                           Top of Page


Reeves, William H.

Reeves, aged 23 years, 4 months and 24 days.
He was a member of Company I, 4th Regiment Va. Vol. Infantry.
     Thus has another of our young men fallen a victim to this unholy crusade against freedom and liberty, and his parents and friends called on to mourn his loss. Few, if any of our young men of Gallipolis, excelled Sergeant Reeves in morality and gentlemanly deportment. He entered the service from a conscientious sense of duty, and whilst health and strength were given him, performed his duty as a brave and gallant soldier. His remains were brought home and interred in the cemetery at Gallipolis, whither they were followed by a large concourse of citizens. Due honors were paid him by the Trumbull Guard.

[Note: Buried in Pine Street Cemetery; Died Feb. 5, 1864]

Gallipolis Journal
Feb. 18, 1864 Vol XXIX No 13
Transcribed by Theresa E. Smith


Regnier, Henry A.

     Henry Aurelius Regnier was born in Gallipolis, Ohio, Jan. 12th, 1838, and died in Iowa, April 12th, 1895, aged 57 years and 3 months. His earlier life was mostly spent in Gallipolis and when the War broke out he became quite active in military circles. He commanded the guards who escorted the Pt. Pleasant hostages to Camp Chase in '61, these being the first prisoners in that noted prison, for which he was offered a commission of Major by Gov. Todd, but declined it. He then recruited for the 4th Va. Infantry and in the spring of 1862, with others raised the famous 18th Ohio Independent Battery of which he was a 1st Lieutenant and much of the time was in command of same, (Capt. Aleshire being detailed for other service.) serving the Army of the Cumberland under General Gordon Granger, of whom he was a great admirer.
     During the battle of Franklin, Tenn., Lieut. Regnier was in the hospital sick with inflamatory rheumatism. Much hard fighting was done in the Hospital grounds, and it was with charin and disappointment that he was forced to lie in bed and listen, but not participate. On account of continued illness from rheumatism and by the advise of physicians he resigned his commission and on April 15, '63, he reluctantly left the army. Going to Wisconsin and the northwest in search of health, he finally permanently located in Davenport, Iowa, Jan. 1st '64. Here he at once grew promoinent in business circles and accumlated considerable property, but later met heavy financial losses in Chicago.
     About 9 years ago he became an invalid, the result of being vaccinated with impure virus, and during this time was a great sufferer. As a citizen he was highly respected, having the confidence and regard of all, as was evidenced by the many tributes of flowers, etc., and in his domestic life was above reproach. He leaves a wife, a grown son and daughter, three sisters and two brothers, near
relatives
     Dear one, rest, thy trials are o'er,
     Thou art now at peace, on the other shore,
     Beyond the reach of human vice,
     And free from earthly in justice.

Gallipolis Daily Tribune
Volume III
Number 46
April 24, 1895
Gallipolis, Ohio

Transcribed By: MLT                                                                                      Top of Page


Reynolds, David

War Veteran Hears Taps

David Reynolds, Formerly of Cheshire, Died in Indiana
     David Reynolds, a civil war veteran and formerly of Cheshire, died Thursday at the home of his son Perry in South Bend, Ind., where he had resided for three years past.
     Funeral services were held in South Bend Friday and the body brought to Cheshire where additional services were held at the Baptist church Sunday, with burial in Gravel Hill cemetery.

The Gallia Times
Gallipolis, Ohio, Thursday, November 11, 1926, page 1
Submitted by Jean Hoffman


Rhey, Schuyler G.

     Schuyler G. Rhey was born June 5, 1827 in Amherst Co., Va. He was the oldest son of Wm. and Martha Rhey. His youth was spent on a farm. He was married Oct 11, 1857 to Melvina Vandevender; they have seven children, six of whom are still living.
     He enlisted in the war in August 1862, where he served faithfully until his return home in June 1865. He was wounded at Petersburg, Va. He moved from W.Va., to Addison, Ohio, in March 1885. After many years constant suffering which he bore with great patience, he died near Addison, Ohio, March 21, 1891, aged 63 years, 9 months and 16 days.
     He was a member of the M.E. Church, spent part of his life in the ministry and was a faithful follower of Christ in whom he trusted until death. His sufferings are exchanged for eternal glory in the presence of God. He leaves a wife to mourn the loss of a faithful husband, his children the loss of a kind father, and the community the loss of a highly esteemed citizen, a good neighbor and friend. We suffer our bereavement with the blessed assurance that our loss is his eternal gain.
     The funeral services were conducted by Rev. Bell of Cheshire, Ohio. The family extend their thanks to the friends and neighbors to whom they will ever feel grateful for their kindness.

[Note: Buried in Gravel Hill Cemetery, Cheshire, Twp.; Civil War Vet.- Company F, 11th Regiment, West Virginia Infantry; alternate name spelling Skylor G. Rhey or Scheyler G. Rhey]

Gallipolis Journal
April 1, 1891
Transcribed by Theresa E. Smith                                                                     Top of Page


Rice, George Allen

Allen Rice Dead
     Mr. Allen Rice, of Guyan township, near 77 years old, died Sunday night, leaving a wife and daughter, Mrs. Riley Cartt of Crown City and sons Charles of Mason, and Hiram of Crown City. He was a son of the old pioneer Reuben Rice. He was a soldier, an artilleryman, during the war and was a good citizen and his death was generally regretted.

[Note: Buried Townhouse-Johnson Cemetery in Guyan Township; 1830-1911. Co. G, 1st Ohio Volunteer Heavy Artillery]

Gallipolis Tribune
April 17, 1911
Vol. XXXXL No. 14 p. 1
Transcribed by Jan Rader


Richards, John L.

Jack Richards Dead
     John Richards, a well known farmer of Cora, died Thursday morning after a short illness. He is survived by a wife, whose maiden name was Mary Ann Ress, sons John and Thomas, and three daughters. He was about 65 years of age and was a son of Timothy Richards who came to this country from Wales. He leaves a number of brothers and sisters. Mr. Richards was a veteran of the Civil War and drew a substantial pension. He is considered one of the wealthiest citizens of Perry Township. He was a fine old gentleman, honorable in all his dealings, a good husband and father and had many friends who will regret his death.

[Note: Buried Tyn Rhos Cemetery, Perry Township; B. April 12, 1844 - D. June 30, 1910; Civil War - Company G, 41st Regiment O.V.I.]

Gallipolis Journal
Wednesday July 6, 1910
Vol. 92 No. 28
Transcribed by Theresa E. Smith                                                                     Top of Page


Ridgeway, Edward Naret

E.N. Ridgeway Dies, In His 101st Year
Oldest Man in This End of State---Most of Life Spent Within Mile or Two
of Birthplace in Raccoon Tp.---Funeral at Harrisburg 1 O'Clock Tuesday
     Edward Naret Ridgeway, Gallia County's oldest Citizen and oldest native and believed to be the oldest man in southern Ohio, died at about 11 o'clock Sunday forenoon at his home at Harris. His age was 100 years, six months and three weeks. He exceeded by one month and 13 days the age of "Aunt Sallie" McCormick, who died Dec. 6, 1932. That the end was near was generally known, though he rallied very noticeably from a recent and severe illness.

Lived in Small Circle
     During the next to the last interview this writer had with him, Mr. Ridgeway chuckled, "I am the oldest person I have ever seen."
     He was born about a mile west of the home wherein he died, and in the direction of Rio Grande, and more than 85 years of his life were spent in Raccoon tp. The funeral services will be held at 1 o'clock Tuesday at the Harrisburg church, with Rev. R.R. Denney in charge. Burial, according to reports heard, will be in Fairview cemetery near Bidwell.
     Mr. Ridgeway was the son of William and Jane Daughtery Ridgeway and Nov. 6, 1833, the first year of Andrew Jackson's second administration, was his birthdate. He was named after Dr. Edward Naret, one of the early historians and French physicians of this city, and among those named after Mr. Ridgeway is E.N. Leonard, well-known surveyor.
     Decedent's father coming from the southland settled in 1803 in Chillicothe, then the capital of the state. His mother was one of triplets born to a Greenbrier county (then in Virginia) family. Most of his years were devoted to farming. He was a contractor at Washington C.H. for 12 years and as a young man saw service along the Kanawha as one of the Squirrel Hunters assembled to hold off a threatened raid of Confederates. He prospected for minerals several years in Colorado.
     He was married three times. His first wife, Sarah Ellen White, was the mother of the four surviving children: Mrs. Ollie P. Rawson, Des Moines; Mrs. Jessie Wells, Indianapolis; Elmer Ridgeway, Jackson, and Edward E., Muncie, Ind.
     Elmer Ridgeway is a funeral director and he removed the body to Jackson Sunday for embalming.
Some after Mrs. Ridgeway's death he married Kate Erwin. She, too, died and about the turn of the century he married Pearl Wood, of Harris, 40 years younger than himself, and she survives.

[Note: Another article states that he was the last of the Squirrel Hunters.]

Gallipolis Daily Tribune
May 28, 1934
Transcribed by Henny Evans

Squirrel Hunter Gets Discharge
E.N. Ridg(e)way of Harris Received Discharge Papers after 66 Years
     Sixty-six years ago, during the dark days of the civil war, E.N. Ridgway. now living at Harris in Raccoon township, joined Capt. Samson Hines' company of "Squirrel Hunters," an organization called out by Governor David Tod to prevent an invasion of Ohio by the forces of Gen. McClausland, who swept down the Kanawha Valley with a force of Johnny Rebs chasing ahead of him Gen. Lightburn and his corps of Boys in Blue.
     The threatened invasion stopped at Pt. Pleasant with a skirmish. The Squirrel Hunters, armed with rifles were good shots. About all of them have now passed away. Mr. Ridgway has just received his dicharge papers as a member of this famous organization after a lapse of 66 years.

Gallia Times
February 9, 1928
Transcribed by Henny Evans                                                                           Top of Page


Rife, George L.

     Capt. Moses Rife, of the 56th O.V.I., who has been in the service since the summer of 1861, arrived home last week, having been mustered out of the service. He brought with him the remains of his brother, who was killed in Gen. Grant's movement to the rear of Vicksburg.

[Note: The brother was George L. Rife who is buried in Rife Cemetery, Addison Township, although he was reported to have been buried first in Vicksburg National Cemetery. He was born about 1849 and was killed in action May 16, 1863 at Champion's Hill, Mississippi.]

Gallipolis Journal
March 15, 1866
Transcribed by Eva Swain Hughes


Rife, Jacob

Taps Sounded For Jacob Rife, an Old Soldier
Burial at Old Kyger
     Jacob Rife, an old soldier and a well respected citizen, died at his home at Glenwood, W.Va., early Saturday morning. The body was brought here Sunday morning over the K. & M. The funeral was held at First Kyger F. W. B. Church at 10 o'clock conducted by Rev. Crabtree.
Mr. Rife was the eldest son of Alvin and Agnes Rife and was born March 6, 1839; died Jan 29, 1910, aged 70 years 10 months, 23 days.
     He was united in marriage to Sarah S. Shuler Oct., 1861. To this union was born one child which died in infancy. His wife died in October 1892. He was united in marriage to Mrs. Rose Curry in March 1898. She survives him and he is also survived by four brothers and one sister -- John and Benjamin of Glenwood, Ellis, William and Mrs. Alex Scott of Kyger.
     He enlisted in the service of his country in 1863 and served until the end of the war. He had been a great sufferer for a great many years. The following comrades were the pall bearers: S.H. Jacobs, E.T. McMillin, David Lasley, Wm. Shuler, Robert Mauck, Joseph Roush. Burial in the family burying ground by Undertaker Hix.

[Note: Buried in Rife Cemetery in Cheshire Twp. Date of death on stone states Jan 10, 1910 & obit states Jan 29, 1910. The date on the stone was probably copied from a Grave Registration Card, which was incorrect. Civil War - Company G, 141st O.V.I.]

Gallipolis Journal
Wednesday Feb. 2, 1910 Vol. 92 No. 6
Transcribed by Theresa E. Smith                                                                     Top of Page


Rife, Joseph

     Mr. Joseph Rife was born in Addison tp., Gallia County, Ohio, on the 10th day of July, 1836, and died on the 19th day of December, 1882, aged 52 years, 5 months and 9 days having always resided on the farm that he died on.
     Mr. R. was left fatherless when quite a boy. He with his brothers and sisters were brought up by their widowed mother, who for several years of her life was deprived of her eye-sight, and in her declining years was left in the care of this affectionate son, who was untiring in his efforts to promote and increase her happiness during her days of affliction.
     He was married to Miss Fannie Darst, December 12th, 1856, by whom nine children were born, two of which have gone before him to their long home, and seven remain with their widowed mother, to mourn their loss of an affectionate husband and father, and his neighbors an honest, ever friendly citizen. The virtues of his private character, less conspicuous in their nature, and consequently less generally known, endeared him to those he was more imminently connected with, and who saw him in the retired scenes of life.
     He was a cheerful, agreeable and facetious companion; a faithful friend, an affectionate husband and
parent, and a charitable benefactor of the poor; possessed of generosity, without affectation, bounded by prudence and economy. The constant accurate knowledge he had of his income and expenses, the consequence of uncommon regularity in his accounts, enabled him to avoid the opposite extremes of meanness and profusion.
     The funeral services were conducted by Rev. A.O. Ebright, and largely attended.

[and also this from the same edition]

     Mr. Joseph Rife, a resident of the Campaign Valley, about four miles from Addison, was buried on the 21st int. He was sick only about one week of Pneumonia.

[Note: He served as a Squirrel Hunter and is buried in Rife Cemetery in Addison Township.]

Gallipolis Journal
December 28, 1882
Transcribed by Henny Evans                                                                           Top of Page


Riggs, Jacob

Jacob Riggs Dead

One of Oldest and Best Loved Residents of County Passes.
     Hon. Jacob Riggs, one of the most venerable and best loved men in Gallia County, passed away at his home at Clay Chapel in Clay township Monday after a week's illness. He had been in failing health for several years. The funeral services will be held Wednesday at Clay Chapel at 2 p.m. Eastern time, conducted by Rev. J. R. Fields, the interment following in the church cemetery.
     Mr. Riggs was born in Monroe County, this state on Jan. 22, 1824, and moved to Gallia County with his parents, James and Mary Riggs when about eight years of age. His parents were among the pioneer settlers in that section, and the rugged physique, honest purpose and upright life which they led was passed on in full measure to their son.
     On March 4, 1848, almost 68 years ago, Mr. Riggs was united in marriage with Miss Elizabeth Guthrie of Clay township, and who survives him with the following children: Misses Rose and Mary Riggs, Mrs. B. H. Ingels, Mr. Edward Riggs, and Mr. Ernest Riggs, the latter now of Marietta. One brother, Harvey Riggs, located in the west, and a sister, Mrs. Mary Hall of Bloomington, Ill., survive him, both at great age.

In Memory
     Jacob Riggs was born in Monroe county, Ohio, January 22, 1824, and departed this life December 20, 1915, at the advanced age of 91 years, 10 months and 28 days.
He was married to Miss Elizazbeth M. Guthrie, March 28, 1848. To them were born eight children, five of whom are living. Three children, James, Mrs. W. D. Graham and Mrs. George Gilman have preceded their father to the home beyond.
     Mr. Riggs was converted and united with the Methodist Episcopal church at Clay Chapel when he was only a boy and retained his membership here until he became a member of the church triumphant. He was an industrious hard working man and by industry, frugality and honest and careful business methods was able not only to accumulate considerable property, but to occupy an enviable position in the community. The fact that he occupied such a position never led him to use it to gain a single advantage of any fellowman no matter how humble that man's place. His situation rather deepened his sense of responsibility and gave him the conviction that he was his brother's keeper, and no one who knew his life, doubts for a moment that his life was dominated largely by that conviction.
     While the business side of his life was marked and prominent it was the religious side that made him the man that everybody knew and loved. He had great faith in God, a faith that was childlike in its simplicity. God and Heaven were realities to him. He lived in the constant companionship of the one and in the full expectation of the enjoyment of the other.
     While his life was deeply religious it was intensely practical. He believed that religion is a thing for this --- and that it is for every day; that --- --- life is under its control. He heard his Master say: "In as much as ye did unto one of the least of these ye did it unto me." So no cry of need ever went unheeded. No one was ever turned hungry from his door. No one could complain of dishonest or unfair treatment at his hand.
     The great rule laid down by the Christ for the regulation of or conduct toward one another, was the Golden Rule of his life. His deep interest in the church has been life long. Not only by his means and by his active participation in all church enterprises, but by the unconscious influence of a great and noble life has he presented the Christ of Calvary to needy men. No pastor has gone from Clay Chapel in more than half a century without good reason to thank God for Jacob Riggs.
     For several years his health has been failing. For all this time he has moved about in his quiet way as though waiting for the end. It has finally come. A long life is ended. A life's work is done. A journey is finished and at Home, he can rest. After an acquaintance of more than ten years and after hearing expressions from the lips of many people from various walks of life, we believe we can truthfully say:"None knew him but to love him or named him but to praise."
     He leaves to mourn their loss an aged and devoted wife, two sons, three daughters, seven grandchildren, five great-grandchildren and a circle of relatives and friends as large as his acquaintance.

[Note: picture in paper]

Gallipolis paper
December 20, 1915
Transcribed by Maxine Marshall

Riggs, Jacob

Jacob Riggs Dead
One of Gallia's Oldest and Best Citizens Passes
     Jacob Riggs, one of Gallia county's most prominent old citizens, passed away at his home near Raccoon Island at a little after the noon hour Monday, December 20, 1915. Mr. Riggs was born in Monroe county, O., January 22, 1824, the son of James and Mary Riggs, and came to this county when quite young. He was county commissioner for a number of years in Gallia county. He was an industrious man, kind and generous with all he came in contact with and esteemed by many friends and considered one of Gallia county's best citizens.
     Mr. Riggs is survived by his widow Mrs. Elizabeth Riggs, daughters, Misses Rose and Mary, Mrs. Bert Ingels and sons, Edward and Ernest and numerous grandchildren and great grandchildren.
     The funeral will be conducted by Rev. J.R. Fields at Clay Chapel Wednesday at 2 P.M., eastern time, interment to follow at the chapel cemetery under direction of Wetherholt.
     Mr. and Mrs. Riggs celebrated their sixty-eight year of wedded life some time ago.
     In the palmy days of the White Collar Line boats Jacob Riggs was one of the biggest cattle shippers that went to the Cincinnati market. He is said to have made possible the building of Clay Chapel a Methodist
place of worship. The fine big bell on Clay Chapel formerly on the big sidewheel packet of St. Lawrence of 25 years back was presented to Mr. Riggs who placed the bell in the belfry of Clay Chapel where it has performed services for many years.

[Note: He served as a 1st Sergeant in the Squirrel Hunters.]

Gallipolis Daily Tribune
December 21, 1915
Transcribed by Henny Evans                                                                           Top of Page


Ripley, Amos, Capt.

Death of Capt. Amos Ripley
     Another of the old inhabitants of Gallia County passed away on Friday last. Capt. Amos Ripley died at his home near Patriot, at the advanced age of eighty-six years. He had been sick for several months past, but was able to be about his residence and grounds until a few weeks since. Capt. Ripley had command of Co. F, 141st Regiment O.N.G., during its service in the Rebellion, and although past sixty years of age, did good service. In 1871 he was elected Sheriff of Gallia County, which office he filled with credit for two terms. The funeral was held on Saturday last, the Masonic Lodges of Patriot and Centerville assisting in the services. Seven children, four boys and three girls, survive him. Capt. Ripley's death will be severely felt by his many relatives and friends.

[Note: He is buried in Ripley Cemetery in Perry Township and the dates on his stone are January 8, 1803-August 23, 1888.]

Gallipolis Journal
August 28, 1888
Transcribed by Henny Evans


Ripley, Harvey

Death of Mr. Ripley

     Mr. Harvey Ripley of Patriot, died Monday night, March 15th at 10 o'clock after a long illness with consumption. He left a wife but no family. Mr. Ripley was a good citizen and well liked by all who knew him.

[Note: Death Certificate..Born Dec 25, 1842; died March 15, 1909; aged 66 years 2 months and 20 days. Parents Amos Ripley and Polly Griswold (both born NY). Burial Mound Hill Cemetery.]

Gallipolis Daily Tribune
March 16, 1909
Transcribed by F.K. Brown         


Ripley, J. O. (James Oliver)

     J. O. Ripley, brother of A. S. Ripley of Patriot, died at his home Friday evening of a general illness due to old age, being eighty some years of age. He was one of our most highly respected citizens, known throughout the county. He is survived by his wife, two children, Mrs. Amos Boggs and Frank Ripley of Charleston, W. Va. The funeral was conducted at Salem church Sunday.

[Note: Served in the Civil War Co. F 141st OVI. From death certificate date of birth June 23, 1835; date of death October 6, 1916; father Ammon Ripley; mother Permelia/Pamelia Rekard; half brother to Ammon Sanford Ripley.]

Gallipolis Daily Tribune
October 9, 1916
Transcribed by Lynn Anders                                                                           Top of Page


Ripley, Nathan

     Nathan Ripley died Friday, Sept. 23. He was buried at Patriot Saturday. The funeral was preached by Rev. T. H. Neal.

The Gallipolis Journal
Sandfork News Notes
Wednesday, September 18, 1892
Transcribed by Sandy L. Milliron

In Memoriam
     At a meeting of Amos Carter Post No. 388 Department of Ohio G.A.R. held at Patriot, O., on the 15th day of October 1892 the following resolutions were unanimously adopted.
     WHEREAS; death has again entered our ranks and removed from our midst our worthy comrade Nathan 
                      Ripley of Co. F, 141 Regiment Ohio, Infantry Volunteer; therefore be it
     RESOLVED; that our hall be draped in mourning, for thirty days and that while deeply deploring his loss                         we extend to the bereaved family and friends our heartfelt sympathy and commend them in                         their affliction to the care of our divine Commander the source of all consolation who doeth  
                      all things well.
     RESOLVED; that a copy of these resolutions be sent to the bereaved family and to each of the county   
                      papers for publication.
                                                            Daniel Miller
                                                            R. F. Bostick
                                                            David Reese
                                                            Committee

[Note: Buried in Ripley Cemetery in Perry Twp.; Civil War - Company F, 141st O.V.I. musician]

Gallipolis Journal
Wednesday Nov. 2, 1892
Vol. LVII No.49
Transcribed by Theresa E. Smith


Ripley, Philo

Philo Ripley Dead
Fine Old Rio Grande Veteran Passes Out
     Sunday Comrade Philo Ripley was laid to rest in the grave, having died Friday at one p.m., Nov. 6, 1914. He was a Civil War veteran, being a member of Co. F, 141 O.V.I. and his father was Captain of his Co. He also was deputy sheriff of this county, his father being sheriff.
     Philo Ripley was not one of those of a talkative nature, but was peaceable and kind always, caring for his own business, a lovable christian man. Although having reached a ripe old age, 84 years, 7 months and 22 days, he will be much missed.
     He leaves two brothers and a sister to mourn his loss, only one brother being able to be by his beside at his death, Mr. Amos Ripley, of Huntington, W.Va. His other brother lives at Parkersburg and his sister at Marietta, also a brother–in-law, D.W. White and nieces Anna and Ina White, with whom he had made his home for a number of years. Also Mrs. W.R. White and family of Gallipolis are relatives, Mr. Ripley’s wife (deceased) being a White. The burial was at Calvary cemetery. Rev. W.J. Fulton by his request while living had charge of the service, aided by the Centerville lodge of Masons. D.R.E.

Gallipolis Daily Tribune
November 9, 1914
Transcribed by Henny Evans                                                                           Top of Page


Roberts, George K.

Death of Mr. Roberts
     George K Roberts, Ironton, born March 10, 1834, at Porter, this county, and distinguished as first boy baby born in that village, died last Saturday. He spent 15 years before the mast on the sea, enlisted in the Navy in 1865 and served on several battleships, until July 20, 1868. After that he made wagons at Porter, married Emma Carrell of that place, and is survived by one son Wm. F. Roberts, at Cincinnati, by that wife. In 1876 he married Kate Wells, of Wilkesville, and she and three daughters survive him in Ironton where he was buried. He was a good and useful man.

[Note: Enlisted in United States Navy as a seaman on Jan. 4, 1865 and served on battleships.]

Gallipolis Daily Tribune
March 15, 1911
Transcribed by Jessica L. Weber


Roberts, Joseph Alexander

     Joe Roberts, Confederate veteran of the Civil War, was born at Dog Gap, Western Virginia, (near Charleston), in 1843. At the age of seventeen, he enlisted in the Confederate Army, serving until the surrender at Appomattox. Mr. Roberts served as a teamster. One of the last battles of the war was the Battle of Cedar Creek, Virginia. Mr. Roberts served in that battle and many years later, told of the slaughter and carnage suffered by the armies. Perry and James Brumfield were also there fighting for the North. James lies buried in those slopes.
     Prior to the enlistment of Joe Roberts at Dog Gap, Virginia, he met a beautiful young lady whose name was Amanda Hutchins. They fell in love and planned to be married. However, before the wedding could be arranged, the Battle of Fort Sumter was fought. This was the beginning of a war that turned North against South, and neighbor against neighbor. While young Roberts was wearing the uniform of grey, Amanda Hutchins, with her parents, moved to Waterloo. Mr. Hutchins was anti-slavery and felt the move to be in accordance with his sympathies. After the surrender, Joe Roberts came to Waterloo and married his intended. They had eight children: Emma, Joseph Burton (Ott), Nathaniel (Hutt), Fred, Ernest, Henry, Rone (Roan), and May.
     During the 1920's, Uncle Joe cut and sawed lumber for his own coffin. He brought the lumber to W.W. Phillips, who sent it to a coffin maker in Huntington. Uncle Joe would inquire of Mr. Phillips when the casket would be delivered. This would be the expected question whenever the two met. The arrival of Uncle Joe's coffin became the topic of conversation among the members of the community. The nearer the day for delivery came, the more often Uncle Joe would inquire of it. Finally, the day came and the coffin was delivered, packaged in a huge wooden box. Mr. Phillips met Uncle Joe at Brown's store and informed him that at last his coffin had arrived and inquired when he was coming up to see it. Uncle Joe, with a surprised look, exclaimed, "I don't want to see it. Just want to know it's there."
     Virgil Null remembers the day Uncle Joe died. The coffin was removed from its container. Those that came to pay their respects to Uncle Joe and see the coffin, agreed that it was very beautiful and fitting for the old veteran. He died in 1930. His wife, Amanda, was born in 1847 and died in 1907.

[Note: He is buried in Waterloo Cemetery in Walnut Township. He served in Batty C, Virginia Co. C. Wise Legon Light Artillery.]

Source unknown
March 1930
Transcribed by Henny Evans


Roberts, James L.

James Roberts Dead
     James L. Roberts, 74 years old, died Friday morning at his home in East Gallipolis, after a few days illness. He was a member of the old 4th W. Va. regiment under Colonel Vance. He was born in Wood County, Pa., and was a carpenter by trade. The funeral was conducted Sunday afternoon at Epworth M.E. Church by Rev. Hugh Evans and the burial was at the Pine Street Cemetery by Wetherholt. Mr. Roberts is survived by his wife and four children, Mrs. Fred Hoppes of Columbus, William of this city, James F. of Kanauga and Mrs. Jas. Jolly of this city; a brother also survives in Mason County, W.Va.

[Note: Buried in Pine St. Cemetery, Gallipolis Twp.-From Death certificate B. Aug 18, 1838 - D. Aug. 2, 1912 Company B 4th W.Va. I]

Gallipolis Bulletin
Aug 8, 1912 No. 32 Page 1
Transcribed by Theresa E. Smith


Roberts, Jonathan M.

Death of Max Roberts
     Max Roberts, a highly respected old soldier living at Rodney, this county, died there Saturday after a protracted illness. The burial was at the Long Cemetery Monday at 10:30.

[Note: He served in Co. G, 195th O.V.I.]

Gallipolis Daily Tribune
December 23, 1895
Transcribed by Henny Evans


Ropeter, Fredrick

     Mr. Fred Ropeter died at the home of son-in-law, Mr. J.H. Echelmeyer, at Cadmus, Wednesday morning, April 19, 1905, aged 76 years, 7 months and 2 days. He had been ill a long time with spinal trouble and the end was not unexpected.
     Mr. Ropeter was one of the old German citizens who settled in this county many years ago, most of whom have passed to the better land. He was born in Germany and came to this country with his wife over 50 years ago. After a short stop at Pittsburg he came to this county and had resided here ever since.
Honest, industrious and manly he won and retained until his death the respect and esteem of all his neighbors. Besides his aged wife he leaves one daughter, Mrs. J.H. Echelmeyer, and also granddaughters Mrs. Henry Grube, of Court street, this city, Miss Anna and Miss Lena Echelmeyer and an adopted daughter, Miss Clara Lindle, all at the home place, and one grandson Mr. Fred Echelmeyer; also two great grand-daughters, Della and Eda, daughters of Mr. and Mrs. Henry Grube.
     During his long illness he received every care and attention that loving hands and medical skill could avail and passed away painlessly and peacefully. His wife has also been an invalid and practically helpless for several years and she too must soon pass over to join the loved ones gone before.
     The funeral services were held at Klages Thursday afternoon by Rev. Lahne, of the Ironton German Lutheran church, interment following at the same place by undertaker Myers, of Sand Fork.

[Note: He served in Co. B, 173rd Ohio Volunteer Infantry and he is buried in German-Ridge Cemetery in Walnut Township.]

Gallipolis Bulletin
April 21, 1905
Transcribed by Henny Evans


Rose, Eli

Eli Rose Dead
    
Eli Rose, aged 78 years and a Civil War veteran, passed away last Thursday, June 18, at his home on Vine Street.
     He was born in Mason County, W.Va., and in 1859 was united in marriage to Miss Massie Grove, of W.Va. They became the parents of fourteen children and his widow and the following eight survive;
Mrs. Julia Ward and Mrs. Jacob Livesay of Gallipolis, Mrs. Laura Earwood of Iowa, Mrs. Ada Hess and Mrs. Evy of Columbus, John of Hilton, Bert of Blazer, and Charles of Northup.
     The funeral was held Sunday at the residence by Rev. F.M. Evans. The services were under the auspices of Cadot Post, G.A.R. Comrades S.F. Neal, H.C. Zimmerman, W.W. Watts, S.B. Winters, Chas. Weihe and J.A. Angell acted as pall bearers. The body was laid to rest in Northup cemetery by undertaker Wetherholt.
Mr. Rose was a member of Co. L., 7th Ohio cavalry under Capt. John Leaper, enlisting in 1862, and received a pension of $30 a month.
     He was a member of Grace M.E. Church of Gallipolis, and was a man held in high esteem by everyone. He had been a Journal subscriber for 60 years.

[Note: Northup and Rose Cemetery are one and the same. From research B. 14 Nov 1835]

Gallipolis Journal
June 26, 1914
Transcribed by Theresa E. Smith                                                                     Top of Page


Rose, Emmons Corwin

     Emmons Corwin Rose, aged 22 years, enlisted in August, 1861, in Co. B, 36th O.V.I., was killed at the battle of Missionary Ridge, 25th November, 1863—unmarried.

[Note: This was taken from a list of soldiers who died in the war.]

Gallipolis Journal
September 28, 1865
Transcribed by Eva Swain Hughes


Rose, James

IN MEMORY
     James Rose was born in Monroe County, Virginia April 8, 1840. He died July 14, 1918, aged 78 years, 3 months and 6 days. He was a son of Jackson and Ruth (wolf) Rose.
     At the outbreak of the Civil war Mr. Rose still resided in his native county and, being a thorough Union man, he was arrested by the rebel authorities. In February, 1862, they took him to South Carolina where they forced him to join the army. On March 8, 1862, he was sent to the 60th Virginia Infantry. He remained with his regiment until the 17th day of October, 1863, when he escaped to the Union lines and came to this county, where his family followed him.
     He settled near Gallipolis, and after working a short time on the Ohio river government boats he removed to Raccoon township he engaged in farming, which he has followed since. About 30 years ago he moved to Huntingon township where he lived on a farm. Selling out seven years ago, he moved to Raccoon township where he has since lived.
     He was united in marriage to Amanda E. Newman on Aug. 11, 1857, at Uniontown, Va. She was a daughter of William and Elizabeth Newman. They became the parents of the following children: Martha Welker, Vinton; William, deceased; Wash J., New Haven, Ind.; Annie Wilson, Bidwell; and Marion of Gallipolis.
     His aged wife and four children survive him, also five grandchildren and seven great grand-children. He also leaves three brothers, Joseph of this county, Harvey and Al of Virginia and one sister, Mrs. C. Reynolds of the same state, and many near relatives and friends.
     He had been in poor health for several years, but his last sickness was only of two weeks' duration, which he bore with great patience, always having words of praise for those who waited on him.
     In the year 1868 he joined the U.B. Church at Mt. Olive. Death came to him as a friend, bearing him away from the weight of years to a happier life. His funeral was conducted by Rev. T.M. Rickets of Junction City at Mt. Tabor on July 16. Burial in cemetery there by H.K. Butler.

Gallia Times
July 31, 1918
Transcribed by Henny Evans


Rose, Jehu

     Rev. Jehu Rose died Friday evening, March 3, 1905, after a long illness of dropsy and heart trouble, aged 73 years. Early in life he was a farmer but about thirty years ago became a regularly ordained minister and belonged to various conferences of the M.E. Church in his state. He was also a veteran of the civil war, being a member of Company K, 173 O.V.I., and belonged to the local G.A.R. Post, under whose auspices he was buried. About ten years ago he was retired from the ministry and had been an invalid ever since. He was an honorable, upright gentleman, a good husband and father and his death will be regretted by his numerous acquaintances. The funeral services were held Monday afternoon, interment following in Clay Chapel by Wetherholt. He leaves a second wife and a large family of children by his first wife and numerous other relatives who will be sympathised with in their bereavement.

[Note: from Stone B. June 6, 1832]

Gallipolis Bulletin
March 10, 1905
Transcribed by Theresa E. Smith


Rose, Jehu

Death of Rev. Jehu Rose
     Rev. Jehu Rose, living near the corner of Second and Spruce streets, died at 8 o'clock, Friday evening, March 3d, 1905. The funeral services will be conducted Monday at one o'clock by Presiding Elder A.J. Hawk at Clay Chapel, the interment by Wetherholt following at the same place in the church cemetery.
     Mr. Rose left a second wife and a large family of children by his first wife and several
brothers and sisters as follows: The six children by his first wife were Descom A. Rose of Lawrence county near Waterloo, Harvey of Walnut township this county, Chas. of Clipper Mill a short distance below town, Stephen of Central City, W.Va., Alice, wife of Jacob Albright of Sandfork and Rachel, wife of Thomas Hamilton of Clipper Mill. He also left step-children, Mrs. Roma Craft, wife of Wm. Craft of Roe, W.Va., Thomas Hamilton, also of Clipper Mill and Arthur Hamilton of Gallipolis, all married people.
     His brothers and sisters are Thomas Rose of Proctorville, John Rose of Glen Roy, Jackson
county, Charles of Duncan Falls, Muskingum county, and Benjamin of the same place, and Mrs. Sarah Eakins, wife of Wm. Eakins of Ottumwa, Iowa, and Deborah Maddy of Greasy Ridge, Lawrence county, O.
     Mr. Rose was born close to the Jackson and Lawrence county line 73 years ago the 6th of
next June. He was first a farmer but became a regularly ordained minister some 30 years ago belonging to various conferences of the M.E. church in this state and became widely known.
     He was first married to Miss Elizabeth J. Niday, daughter of Peter and Deborah Niday of
Mercerville. She died 21 years ago. Sixteen months afterward he was united in marriage with Mrs. Harriet Hamilton, widow of the late James Hamilton of Clipper Mill, with whom he has lived happily to the present and who survives him.
     Mr. Rose was a veteran of the Civil War belonging to Co. K, 173d O.V.I and belonged to
the G.A.(R.) Post here which will participate in his funeral exercises.
     He was put on the retired list in the ministry about ten years ago, and has been more or less an invalid since, but has been unable to be out since the 15th of last December, his ailment being dropsy accompanied by heart trouble. All that could be done for him was kindly and generously done, but all efforts in every direction were unavailing to save his life and he departed as a good citizen, a good soldier and a faithful minister of the Gospel.
     We were unacquainted with Mr. Rose, but he seems to have been beloved by everybody, and
we are told that he was lovely and amiable in character, devoted to his family and they to him. He had been a resident of Clipper Mill a dozen years or more and of this city since last September. The numerous members of his family have the sypmathy of all in their great loss.

Gallipolis Daily Tribune
March 4, 1905
Transcribed by Henny Evans                                                                             Top of Page

Ross, Bourbon Brown

Capt. B.B. Ross, 91, Many Years Active in River Traffic Found Dead in Bed
     The close of a long career as a steamboat captain in the Ohio River came yesterday for Captain Bourbon Brown Ross, 91 years old of 217 Broadway, when he was found dead in his bed at 7 o'clock in the morning by Mrs. Amelia Bogaft, a janitress. He had been ill for months. His death was caused by old age and heart trouble.
     Captain Ross's grandfather was a cousin of Betsy Ross of Virginia, who made the first American flag. His grandfather served under General Washington in the Revolutionary War and his father (B.B.'s great grandfather) was a judge in Virginia. Captain Ross served during the Civil War as a member of the Squirrel Hunters Regiment.
     For the last ten years Captain Ross was cared for by Mrs. Lena Jean Blair of the Broadway Apartments, who was a family friend. Captain Ross was the youngest member of a family of twelve children none of whom died under 90 years of age, but he survived them all. Coming to Cincinnati many years ago, he engaged in work on the steamboats. He was soon made a captain and commanded various steamers plying between Cairo, Illinois and Pittsburgh.
     During his long career Captain Ross was interested in politics and was a staunch supporter of the Democratic Party. It was said that he never failed to vote for more than half a century, until last year when he was confined to his bed. He was well acquainted with Williams Jennings Bryan, serving as chairman of the reception committee whenever Mr. Bryan came to the towns where Captain Ross happened to be present. Captain Ross acted in this capacity when Mr. Bryan made his first visit to Cincinnati.
     Captain Ross had five children, four are living and one deceased. His wife died many years ago. He lived at 217 Broadway for more than twenty-five years. He had been ill for a year, his health gradually failing until he was confined to his bed a week ago. Mrs. Blair visited him the night before his death and saw that his condition was critical.
     The funeral will be held on Thursday afternoon at the funeral home of George Calahan, 607 West Eighth St. A minister of the Ninth Street Baptist Church will officiate at the service. Burial will be in the Baltimore Pike Cemetery, Fairmont.

[Note: This was a transcribed obit with notes made by a family researcher in the 1980's. She pointed out that Betsy Ross never lived in Virginia and that research shows no relationship to the family. Betsy never had any children in her Ross marriage. Also, several of the 12 children in Bourbon's family did not live to be 90. She also suggested that Mrs. Blair was actually a daughter of Bourbon's. His death certificate shows that he was born in Gallia Country October 25, 1835 and died August 24, 1925 in Cincinnati.]

Cincinnati newspaper likely
August, 1925
Transcribed again by Henny Evans


Rothgeb, John

In Memory
   Thursday at 11:30, surrounded by his loving relatives and many friends, John Rothgeb was ushered into the great unknown.  Mr. Rothgeb was ill but a short time and died at the home of his daughter, Mrs. Wm. Deem, at Kanauga, with whom he resided.
   John Rothgeb was born August 11, 1839, and died July 14, 1921, aged 81 years, 11 months and 3 days.  He was a soldier of the war of 1862, and three years of his life were spent in the service of his country.
   He was married to Susan Leslie, Feb. 14, 1869, and to this union were born one daughter and two sons, Mrs. Wm. F. Deem of Kanauga, Mr. Evan Rothgeb of Columbus, and Mr. William Rothgeb of Kanauga, all of whom, with one sister, Mrs. Sarah Tate of Kyger, survive him.
   Mr. Rothgeb lived his life near Kanauga and is well known by people located there and will be greatly missed.   He united with the Fairhaven M.E. Church in 1898, and the funeral was conducted in that church Saturday morning by Rev. Shaver.  He was laid to rest in Pine Street cemetery beside his wife, who died March 1, 1916.
   His relatives wish to extend their thanks to many friends who have shown kindness and friendship in the past few weeks of sickness and sorrow.
   Mr. Rothgeb was a man admired and respected by all, upright in his conduct and commanding the esteem of a large circle of friends.

[Note: Served in Co G, 117th O.V.I. and Co G, 1st Ohio HA]

Gallia Times
July 28, 1921
Transcribed by Theresa E. Smith                                                                     Top of Page


Rothgeb, Samuel

The Late Capt. Samuel Rothgeb
     At a regular communication of Siloam Lodge, No. 456, Free and Accepted Masons, held in its Hall at Cheshire, O., January 28, 1880, the following was adopted by the Lodge:

WHEREAS, It has pleased the Supreme Grand Architect of the Universe in His all wise providence to remove from us by death our esteemed and much beloved worthy Brother, Capt. SAMUEL ROTHGEB, late S.W. of this Lodge, thereby undoing all those fraternal earthly ties that have for so many years bound us; therefore,
RESOLVED, We will always keep in grateful remembrance his example and earnest effort as a tried, true and faithful craftsman to promote the most perfect harmony in the Lodge and among the brethren at all times.
RESOLVED, That we part with our deceased Brother with less sorrowful feelings, being assured that he has been fitted as a lively and living stone for that spiritual building, that house not made with hands, eternal in the Heavens.
RESOLVED, That in his death his family has lost a kind, indulgent, loving father; the fraternity a valued, worthy Brother; the community an esteemed citizen; the poor man his friend.
RESOLVED, That as a mark of our esteem and respect for his memory, our Chapter and Lodge furniture be draped in mourning for sixty days, and that a copy of these Resolutions be presented to the family of the deceased, and that they also be published in the several newspapers of this county and in the Masonic Review.
WM. SYMMES,
R.COLEMAN,
GEO. W. BING,
Committee

Note: Buried in Rothgeb Cemetery in Addison Twp. - B. April 8, 1826 & D. Jan 22, 1880; Co E 141st O.V.I.]

Gallipolis Bulletin
Feb 4, 1880
Transcribed by Theresa E. Smith                                                                     Top of Page


Rouse, William

Death of William Roush
     Mr. William Rouse, of Chambersburg , of whose serious illness we made mention died Wednesday. His funeral services were conducted at Bethel church by Rev. S. S. Denney and he was laid away in the cemetery of the church. He was 90 years old and a fine old citizen and soldier and drew a pension of $50 a month, and left a large family. Attorney Sam Roush being a son.

Gallipolis Tribune
9 January 1914

Transcribed by Robert Trowbridge, Great Grandson
16 August 2004


Rouse, William T.

Wm. Roush Dead
     William Roush, 90 years of age, died at his home at Chambersburg on Wednesday, January 7, 1914, after a long illness. The funeral was conducted at Bethel Church by Rev. S.S. Denney, burial following in the church cemetery. He was a veteran of the Civil War and was a fine old man with many friends who will hear of his death with regret.

[Note: Company A (Company D) 14th Kentucky I; Buried in Bethel Cemetery, Ohio Twp. His service record, obituary and tombstone are spelled Rouse but some feel it should be Roush.]

Gallipolis Bulletin
Jan. 15, 1914
Transcribed by Theresa E. Smith                                                                     Top of Page


Roush, Alonzo D.

     Alonzo D. Roush was born in Kentucky about 1846 to Elisha and E. Roush. By 1850 the family had moved to Morgan Township, Gallia County. Alonzo enlisted in Co. A, 91st Ohio Volunteer Infantry on August 12, 1862. He died of disease at his home October 3, 1862 not even two months after his enlistment. He is buried in Roush Cemetery in Cheshire Township. The American Civil War Data Base lists his death as October 12, 1863 but his tombstone has the 1862 date.

Obit created from census, tombstone and American Civil War Data Base
1862-3
Created by Henny Evans


Roush, John

John Roush, 88, Union Veteran Died This Morning
During War Was Wounded and Captured
Deeply Religious and Genuinely Esteemed
     Taps have sounded for another soldier, for one of the boys who wore the blue and fought to preserve the Union seven decades ago. John Roush, 88, passed away at his home on Pine street, between First and Second avenues at 4 o'clock this morning.

Two Weeks' Illness
     Up until two weeks ago he had been in pretty good health and unusually active for one of his advanced age. Then he contracted a cold, with symptoms of bronchitis or flu developing, and for a fortnight he had been bedfast.
     Most of his years were spent in the Eno neighborhood, but he had resided in this city for five or six years.
Decedent was the sixth child of Moses and Sarah Strickler Roush and was born Jan. 17, 1846, and his age was 88 years and 16 days. He was twice married, first to Lucinda Brown July 20, 1872. She died on Feb. 15, 1905. His surviving widow was Emma Baker, a native of West Virginia. The surviving children, born of the first marriage, are Tom Roush, Oak Harbor, O.; J. Martin Roush, Akron; Stanley, Columbus, and Mrs. Clarence Barnes (whose husband died a few weeks ago), Langsville. Another son, Floyd, died some years ago. George W. Roush of Eno is a brother.

Devoted Methodist
     From the "History of the Roush Family in America," the following excerpts concerning the decendent are taken:

     "It is a coincidence worthy of mention that his home, like that of his great-grandfather, Jacob, has always been a home for ministers. His home is near the M.E. church of Eno, where he holds his membership (he was one of the charter members.) He has stood uncompromisingly for all things righteous. He has traveled extensively and has a large circle of friends.
     "In spite of the handicap caused by a wound in the war he has been successful. He married for his second wife Emma Baker, who is an ideal wife and home-maker. Her genial hospitality renders their home attractive to their many friends. He is a life member of the Roush Family Association.
     "John Roush enlisted in Gallipolis in 1864 and was mustered in at Columbus in Co. B, 36 O.V.I.
     "His first engagement was at Lynchburg, where they were forced to retreat to the Allegheny mountains. After being shut up here by the enemy for five days and nights without supplies they were taken to Charleston. From there they were taken back to the Shenandoah Valley where he fought his last battle on July 24, 1864 in which he was wounded. They were driven back to Harpers Ferry and at 4 o'clock he was taken prisoner with other wounded men. He was taken to Winchester and held there in an old store building for three weeks before being given hospital attention. After being prisoner about two months he was re-captured by his own men on Sept. 19, during the last great battle fought in that vicinity."

     Neighbors and other friends will approve of what the Roush historian has written of John Roush, for he was respected by all who knew him.
     Undertaker A.E. Tope said the funeral arrangements (will not be decided) until the children come and confer.

Gallipolis Daily Tribune
February 2, 1934
Transcribed by Henny Evans                                                                           Top of Page


Roush, Joseph

Joseph Roush Dead
     Joseph Roush, aged 75, passed away Saturday, Oct. 24, at the home of his daughter, Mrs. John Freshcorn at Vinton, after only a few days' illness. The funeral services were held Tuesday afternoon at the Poplar Church by Rev. W.J. Fulton.
     Mr. Roush was one of a family of twelve children. Three of his sisters, Mrs. Mahala Ward and Eliza and Sarah preceded him in death. Those surviving him are Mrs. Mary Lutz of Vanceton and Mrs. Charlotte Darst of Bidwell, and six brothers, George, John and Paul of Eno, Gideon of Columbus and Moses of Fostoria.
Two sons, John of Elgin, Ill., and James of Eno, and two daughters, Mrs. Zelinda Freshcorn of
Vinton, and Mrs. Alwidla Rupe of Eno, also survive their father.
     Mr. Roush was a member of the Christian Church, and a very fine old gentleman. He served during the war in the 195th O.V.I.

Gallia Times
November 1, 1914
Transcribed by Henny Evans

Joseph Roush Dead
     Joseph Roush was born Nov. 1st, 1838 and died Oct 24. 1914, at the home of his daughter, Mrs. John Freshcorn, at Vinton, aged 75 years, 11 months and 23 days. He bore his suffering patiently and passed away after an illness of only three days of heart trouble. He was a soldier in the war of the rebellion and served in the 195th regiment, O.V.I.
     He was a member of the Christian church and was a kind and loving disposition and always ready to help in time of need. He was united in marriage to Mary J. Caldwell, Oct. 28, 1860, who preceded him 11 years ago.
     The funeral was held Tuesday afternoon at the Poplar church, services were conducted by Rev. W.J. Fulton of Rio Grande.

[Note: Buried in Poplar Ridge Cemetery in Cheshire Twp.]

Gallipolis Bulletin
Nov. 5, 1914
No. 45, Pg.1
Transcribed by Theresa E. Smith


Roush, Joseph W.

Civil War Veteran Dies at Cheshire

J.W. Roush, 85, Was Uncle of Gallipolis Dentist
     Joseph W. Roush, aged 85, a Civil War veteran passed away at his home in Cheshire, Sunday Jan. 16. Death was caused from heart trouble he having been in poor health the past year, although able to be about.      He leaves his wife, a son, H.H. Roush, of Cheshire, a daughter Mrs. Fred Drake, of Marion, O., and a number of grand children. Mrs. C.A. Smith of this city is a sister-in-law and Dr. L.E. Smith a nephew, of the deceased.
     Funeral will be Tuesday at 2:30 p.m. at Gravel Hill cemetery Cheshire.

[Note: He served in Co. D, 141st O.V.I.]

Gallipolis Daily Tribune
January 18, 1927
Transcribed by Henny Evans

Roush, Joseph William

IN MEMORY
     As it is recorded in the sacred records, "Man goeth to his long home and the mourners go about
the street--then shall the dust return to earth as it was: and the spirit until to the God who gave it."
This divine truth was again forcibly impressed upon us Sunday morning, Jan. 16, 1927, when the
message went out that Joseph William Roush had heard the one clear call and embarked upon the great unknown.

"I know not where His islands lift their fronded palms in air,
  I only know I can not drift beyond His love and care."

     Mr. Roush, the only son of william and Esther Rothgeb Roush, was born August 7, 1842, at Cheshire, O., on the farm where he spent the greater part of his long and useful life, being past 84 years of age at the time of his passing away. There never occurred a time but that those places where his youthful feet first trod were the dearest to him, and neither the allurement of places or the chance for fame or gain ever lead him away from his birthplace. There are no greater virtues than honesty, truthfulness, and unselfishness. There were his and his reward will come with those who have carried these banners. Kind-hearted, loyal and generous, his life was one that afforded an inspiring example of good citizenship.
     September 1, 1868, he was united in marriage with Miss Margaret Ann Reynolds and for almost 59 years
they shared life's joys and sorrows, living a mutually devoted life together. They became the parents of five children; two daughters, Mrs. Perry Thomas and Mrs. Curtis Reed preceding their father in death by many years,and one son dying in infancy. One son, Horton H., of Cheshire; and one daughter, Mrs. Fred Drake of Marion, O.; fourteen grand children and fifteen great-grandchildren, survive. Mr. Roush had four sisters, Mrs. Mary Jacobs, Mrs. Louisa Shaffer, Mrs. Susan Leslie and Mrs. Arbelia Swisher, who have all passed away, he being the last of the family.
     When the Civil War came on, he first went to Gauley Bridge, W.Va., where he worked for the Government
transporting provisions. Returning to Cheshire, he volunteered under Capt. Amos Mauck, Co. D, 141st Reg.,
serving in carrying messages through the mountains, having many narrow escapes from the enemy in ambush.
     He was one of the few remaining veterans. He was intensively patriotic and his was a great joy and pride
of the returning of the soldiers of the World War. He united with the Presbyterian Church at Cheshire many years ago and was one of the charter members of the K. of P. Lodge of the same place.

There is no death! The stars go down
To rise upon some fairer shore,
And bright in Heaven's jeweled crown
They shine forevermore.

There is no death! An angel form
Walks o'er the earth with silent tread
And bears our loved ones away
And then we call them dead.

And ever near us, though unseen,
The dear immortal spirits tread
For all the boundless universe
In life--there are no dead.

Card of Thanks
     We wish to express our sincere thanks to our relatives and friends and neighbors of Cheshire, who so
kindly assisted us during the illness and death of our husband and father.

[Note: He is buried at Gravel Hill Cemetery in Cheshire Township.]

Gallia Times
January 27, 1927
Transcribed by Henny Evans                                                                        Top of Page


Roush, Wilson Gideon

Wilson Roush Dies in Columbus
     Wilson G. Roush, 71, formerly of Cheshire, but for the past twenty eight years a resident of Columbus, succumbed to a heart attack Tuesday at his home in Columbus. Mr. Roush was employed as Supt. of bridge construction for the Columbus, Delaware and Marion traction line. A son and two daughters survive. Funeral services and burial at Columbus.Mr. Roush will be remembered by a number of our older citizens being familiarly known as "Gid" Roush.

[Note: He served in Co. D, 141st Ohio Volunteer Infantry and Co. G, 197th Ohio Volunteer Infantry. Dates from death certificate November 3, 1849-July 27, 1920. He is buried in Greenlawn Cemetery in Columbus, Ohio.]

Gallipolis Daily Tribune
July 29, 1920
Transcribed by Henny Evans


Rowley, Franklin

     In Witoka, Minn., Sept. 20, 1881, Franklin Rowley, aged 34 years. The deceased was born in this county, was First Lieut. in the 194th O.V.I., and removed to Minnesota in 1866.

Gallipolis Journal
November 17, 1881
Transcribed by Henny Evans


Ruble, George L.

George Ruble Dead
     The remains of George Ruble, who died Sunday in Cincinnati, were brought here Monday and held at the DeMaine morgue until Wednesday afternoon when the funeral and interment took place at the Gravel Hill cemetery at Cheshire. Mr. Ruble formerly lived here, also at Pomeroy and Cheshire, only moving from the latter place to Cincinnati about two months ago. He was only sick about twenty-four hours, his death being caused from ptomaine poisoning. He was a tinner by trade and a veteran of the Civil War. He leaves a widow, who is a sister of Mrs. T.R. Weed, of this place, and for a time she will remain here with her sister and family.
A brother of the deceased, Adam Ruble, died at Rutland only a month ago....Middleport Republican

[Note: He served in Co. K, 140th Ohio Volunteer Infantry. Born 1844, died November 16, 1913.]

Gallia Times
November 26, 1913
Transcribed by Henny Evans


Rucker, Capt.

     Capt. Rucker served his country during the late war as Capt. Co.D 8th W.Va. In. and Capt. Co L 7th W.Va. Cav., serving a period of nearly four years. At the close of the war he entered the U.S. Mail service, where he continued for 21 years. He was an earnest and uncompromising Republican, and he died in the faith of all that was good and glorious. Peace be with him.

[Note: Isaac M. Rucker buried in Crown City Cemetery in Guyan Twp.]

Gallipolis Journal
Wed. March 26, 1890
Vol. LV No. 23
Transcribed by Theresa E. Smith


Ruff, Joshua

Death Of Mr. Ruff
     Mr. Joshua Ruff, of Centerville, about 73 years old and an old soldier and father of Mr. Ed Ruff of this City, was found dead in bed at his home this morning. He leaves a wife and three sons - Bert of Middleport, book keeper in the department store, Frank of Wellston, a weigh boss for a coal company, and Ed, barber of this City.
    He served four years in the 69th and 61st Regiment O. V. I. He went in as a private and was gradually promoted to a 2nd Lieutenancy then a 1st Lieutency and at the close of the war to the Captaincy. He drew a $12 pension and was a fine old gentleman. The funeral arrangement has not been made at this writing.

Gallipolis Daily Tribune
Volume XVII
Number 47
February 25, 1904
Gallipolis, Ohio

Transcribed By: MLT


Ruff, Joshua

     Mr. Joshua Ruff, father of Mr. Ed. Ruff, the barber, was found dead in his bed at his home in Centreville Thursday morning, aged 78 years. He was a veteran of the civil war, serving four years in the 61st and 69th O.V.I., and rose from a private to the rank of Captain. He was a fine old gentleman, an ardent Democrat in politics and was respected by all who knew him. He clerked for Capt. James Grafton in his store at Thurman for many years and was well known.
     He leaves a wife and three sons, Ed. of this city, Bert, a bookkeeper in a store at Middleport, and Frank of Wellston, a weigh boss for a coal company. We were unable to get the funeral arrangements.

[Note: Buried as Joshua Roof - Centreville (Thurman) Cemetery in Raccoon Twp. - Died Feb. 25, 1904 - Unit Co. B 60th O.V.I.]

Gallipolis Bulletin
Feb. 26, 1904
Transcribed by Theresa E. Smith                                                                     Top of Page


Rupe, Lafayette

Civil War Veteran Dies
     Lafayette Rupe a civil war veteran, died Wednesday night at the advanced age of 88 years, in the home of Mr. and Mrs. Doc Roberts, where he had resided for the past three years. He had been confined to his bed since last August. A grand daughter, Miss Bertha Rupe, who lived with him, and two brothers, Darius, Kyger and James Rupe of East Gallipolis are his only surviving relatives. Funeral will be held Friday at 2 p.m. in the parlors of George J. Wetherholt.

[Note: He is buried in Mound Hill Cemetery in Gallipolis Township and he served in Co. B, 136th
O.V.I. ]

Gallipolis Daily Tribune
January 6, 1927
Transribed by Henny Evans


Rupe, Mathias Croy

     Mathias Croy Rupe was born in Gallia County May 15, 1821 to Martin and Hannah Halfhill Rupe. He served three years in the Union Army, a member of Co. I, 4th West Virginia Infantry. He participated in numerous battles including Vicksburg, Chattanooga, Lynchburg and Cedar Creek.
     He settled in Putnam County, West Virginia in 1874 and engaged in farming. On April 18, 1875 he married Ruth Ellen Pierce. They had the following children: Delbert C., Homer M., Lulie Estella and Lillie Cecil. The first wife of Mr. Rupe was Emily Searls whom he married August 11, 1844 and who died October 31, 1874. They had the following children: Mary Evaline, Elizabeth C., Hannah J., Hester A., Alonzo, James N., Jacob E., Augusta E., Rhoda A., Alecta C., Cora E. and Henry B.
     He died March 16, 1908 in Putnam County and is buried in Hurricane Cemetery there.

Obituary created from History of Putnam County, West Virginia.
Abstracted by Henny Evans


Russell, Alvin

     Alvin Russell, of Vanceton, is dead in his 78th year. The funeral services were held at Morgan Center, July 30, by Rev. H. A. Grover, burial by Glassburn.

[Note: Civil War Soldier--Enlisted as a Private on 04 September 1864 at the age of 37. Enlisted in Company I, 173rd Infantry Regiment Ohio on 16 September 1864. Mustered out Company I, 173rd Infantry Regiment Ohio on 26 June 1865 in Nashville, Tn.  He may have been in his 76th year and not his 78th year as stated in news note.  July, 1827 - July 24, 1903.]

Gallipolis Daily Tribune
Friday, August 7, 1903
Transcribed by Sandy L. Milliron


Russell, Harvey

Taps Sound For Old Vet Harvey Russell Of Vinton
His Death This Morning Leaves Only Capt James Gatewood Of Valiant Gallians Who Fought To Make The Union Indestructible
     Harvey Russell, who served in the Union army, died at 3:30 this morning at his home on Jackson street in Vinton. He was 96 years old last Dec. 28 - three weeks ago today - and as far back as 1936 was reputed to be the oldest resident in Huntington tp.
     Mr. Russell's death leaves but one old soldier in Gallia county - Captain James M. Gatewood of near Crown City. Five years ago there were 10 of the old veterans. Francis W. Brookman's death last April left but two survivors of that group.

Born At Porter
     For three or four years Mr. Russell had been in frail health. His last illness was of but a few weeks' duration. Death resulted primarily from infirmities incident to his advanced age. He had lived at Vinton since 1911.
     Harvey Russell was born at Porter, Dec 28, 1844, a son of Samuel and Frances Lawless Russell.
On Aug 26, 1864, he married Eliza Greer and a week later, he joined Co. I, 173rd Ohio Volunteer Infantry, under Captain Samuel Welker of Vinton and served till after the war, having been discharged in June 1865. Mrs. Russell died about 35 years ago.
     Five years later Mr. Russell and Mrs. Florence Craig of Lancaster were united in marriage and she survives him. Also surviving are three children of his first marriage: Edward Russell of Columbus, Joseph of Fostoria and Mrs. Flora Campfield who shared his home and took care of him in his last years. Before going to Vinton, the Russells had lived in Morgan.
     Funeral services will be held at 2 o'clock Monday at the Butler-McCoy funeral home in Vinton. Burial in Vinton Memorial Park.

Gallipolis Daily Tribune
Jan 18, 1941
Transcribed by Maxine Marshall                                                                       Top of Page


Russell, James Alonzo

Death of Old Soldier
    James Alonzo Russell, of near Bulasville, was found dead by his niece, Miss George, in a barn near his residence Friday morning at 11 o'clock. He had been in failing health for some time and that morning went to his barn to attend to some chores. He was seized with apoplexy and death is believed to have instantly resulted.
     Mr. Russell was a successful farmer and highly respected. He was 78 years, 5 months and 9 days old and served during the Civil War in the 141st O.V.I. He is survived by one sister, Mrs. Phoebe Hern of Bulaville, and numerous other relatives.
     The funeral services were held at his residence Sunday afternoon at two o'clock, conducted by Rev. Hugh I. Evans, Presbyterian minister of this city. Burial at the Rife cemetery by Wetherholt. The pall bearers were Wm. Bunce, Wm. Davis, Garrett Yeauger, T.C. Guyn, Levi Hayes and J. J. George.

[Note: From Stone - B. Dec. 15, 1833 & D. May 24, 1912]

Gallipolis Journal
May 29, 1912
Transcribed by Theresa E. Smith


Russell, Alonzo

Found Dead In Barn
     Alonzo Russell, aged 78, a resident of Campaign in Addison Township, was found dead in his barn last Friday morning, May 24, 1912, at about 10 o'clock. He had been in poor health with rheumatism for some time past. Dr. Geo. Barton of Addison was called and pronounced his death due to apoplexy. Mr. Russell had been a widower for 30 years and lived with a niece. A son died ten years ago, after reaching manhood. The funeral services were held Sunday at his late home, conducted by Rev. Geo. Sprouse of Cheshire. Mr. Russell was a good man and citizen, a veteran of the Civil War and has gone to his reward, ripe in years and high in the esteem of his neighbors and friends.

[Note: From Death certificate B. Dec. 15, 1834 & D. May 24, 1912]

Gallipolis Bulletin
May 30, 1912
Transcribed by Theresa E. Smith


Russell, James N.

Resolutions of Respect

WHEREAS, It has pleased the Great Captain to remove from our midst our worthy Comrade, James N. Russell, we therefore offer the following resolutions:
RESOLVED, that in the death of Comrade Russell, Harry Sisson Post G.A.R. has lost one of its most esteemed members, the bereaved widow and son a kind companion and father, and our community an honest, upright citizen.
RESOLVED, That we tender to the bereft family our earnest and heartfelt sympathy.
RESOLVED, That a copy of these resolutions be sent to the widow of the deceased, and to the papers of Gallia county for publication.
By order of Harry Sisson, Post
B.P. Murray
D.T. Lewis
J.S. Cherrington

[Note: Buried in Fairview (Long) Cemetery in Springfield Twp. - Co. D 56th O.V.I.]

Gallipolis Journal
Nov. 6, 1889
Transcribed by Theresa E. Smith                                                                     Top of Page


Russell, Sylvester

Sylvester Russell Dead
     Sylvester Russell, an old soldier of Porter, and a brother of our townsman Harvey Russell, died last Monday morning, and the funeral was held yesterday at the M.E. church, conducted by Rev. McBride. Burial at Clark's Chapel by funeral director H.K. Butler.
     Sylvester Russell was born near Porter, O., July 18, 1835. His whole life was spent in this vicinity except when in the army. He enlisted in Co. I, 173 regiment, O.V.I. and served until the close of the war. He was a stone mason by trade.
     He is survived by his wife and nine children. Four sons, Charley, Harvey, Warren and Bert, all of Bidwell and Porter, and five daughters, Mrs. Mary Farley, Mrs. Maggie Volk, Mrs. Eva Girard, of Columbus, Mrs. Fannie Wilson, of Chicago, Ill., and Miss Mattie at home. He also leaves two brothers, Harvey, of Vinton, and Charles, of Evergreen, and four sisters, Mrs. Needham, of Gallipolis, Mrs. Lucevia Gould, of Kansas, Mrs. Mary Lookadoo and Elizabeth of Porter.

Gallipolis Journal
Dec. 25, 1912
Vol. 94 No. 39
Transcribed by Theresa E. Smith


Rutherford, John

     RUTHERFORD - In Raccoon Township, March 16, 1876, John Rutherford, aged 35 years.  The deceased was a soldier in the late war, serving four years in the 8th Ohio Company of Sharp Shooters, under Captain Bartain.

[Note: Buried in VanZant Cemetery in Cheshire Twp.]

Gallipolis Journal
March 30, 1876
Transcribed by Theresa E. Smith                                                                  Top of Page


Rutter, Henley Chapman, Dr.

Dr. Rutter Dead Takes Own Life
Shocking Event Occurred in Cleveland Sunday Night.
Had Been a Great Sufferer from Incurable Disease for Years.
Was the First Superintendent of the Gallipolis Hospital for Epileptics
"I Can Suffer No Longer. I Intend to Commit Suicide," He Wrote.

     Sunday morning W.G. Sibley received a telegram from Cleveland announcing that Dr. Rutter would be buried at Bellefontaine at 12:30 P.M. Tuesday. No intimation of the cause of death was contained in the message, but the Sunday papers carried the news that he had taken his own life.

Monday's State Journal gives the following account:
     The suicide occurred at 3:15 P.M. Saturday. Several men standing at Ninth Street and Vincent Avenue N.E. in Cleveland, saw Dr. Rutter put a vial to his lips and drink from it. Crossing the street to the Gillsy Hotel, he went in and sat down on a couch. To the manager of the hotel he explained that he taken some drug by mistake. An ambulance was called as Dr. Rutter was being placed in it, J.G. Bender, who had been looking for him, came up and idenfied him.
     Dr. and Mrs. Rutter left Columbus for Cleveland two weeks ago for a visit with Mrs. C.W. Wright, his niece, who lived with him until the time of her marriage. Dr. Rutter returned to Columbus a few days later, but following his return received word that his wife was ill. He left Tuesday for Cleveland. His wife had sent him a letter stating that she would come home, but the letter did not reach him before he left Columbus. Accordingly, wheh Mrs. Rutter arrived home Tuesday night, she found that her husband had left. Thinking that he would return, she remained at their home, 47 North Champion Avenue, until Thursday, when she returned to Cleveland.
     Arriving at the home of Mrs. Wright she learned that Dr. Rutter had gone to Sandusky, presumably to visit a friend, and afterward had gone to Detroit. She did not hear from him until she received a note sent by a messenger Friday, in which he declared his intention to take his life."I can suffer no longer. I intend to commit suicide." This was the end of a long letter.

The Dispatch contains these additional details:
     Early Saturday evening he staggered into the Gillsy hotel, and to Robert Gill, the proprietor, he made the startling ejaculation "I have begun to commit suicide." Mr. Gill summoned aid and had the man taken to Kaeside Hospital, where he died within a few minutes. The poison was of such a subtle nature that Coroner Boeager was unable to identify it from the symptoms.
     The suicide was evidently well and carefully planned. On Saturday morning Dr. Rutter prepared a package which he asked the clerk at the Kennard House to weigh for mailing. He explained that it contained a letter of sixteen sheets. It was never mailed, however, for shortly before the dramatic incident at the Gillsy House, Mr. Wright, received it from the hands of a messenger boy. The package contained Dr. Rutter's watch, several pieces of jewelry and a note announcing his intention to commit suicide. According to Mrs. Rutter and Mrs. Wright, Dr. Rutter's financial troubles have been praying on his mind for months and the trip to Cleveland was taken to afford him a change of surroundings that would aid to relieve his mental distress.
     From "Who's Who in America" we get the following facts about the life of the dead man: He was born at Pearisburg, Va., Feb. 6, 1849, and was educated at Bellefontaine, Ohio. He enlisted in the 132d O.V.I. in the War of the Rebellion at the age of fourteen. Graduated in medicine at the Cincinnati Medical College of Ohio in 1869. His public services were as follows:

Interne [sic], Good Samaritan Hospital, 1869-1870.
Assistant Physician, Dayton Hospital for Insane, 1871-72, and superintendent of same, 1872-74.
Superintendent, Athens State Hospital for Insane, 1875-78, 1879-81.
Superintendent Columbus Hospital for Insane, 1882-84.
Manager, Hospital for Epileptics at Gallipolis, 1893-1901.
He was a member of the academy of Medicine at Columbus, the Ohio State Medical Association, and the American Medical Association.
     He was the author of an able work on Criminal Responsibility on the Insane, and many essays and papers on the care and treatment of epileptics. He was eminent as an alienist, and his book is known and quoted all over the United States. In 1892 he married Margaret M. Crethcer of Bellefontaine.

Gallipolis Daily Tribune
September 19, 1910
Transcribed by Henny Evans


Saddler, Lewis

Death of Mr. Saddler
     Mr. Lewis Saddler, a veteran of the civil war, a fine old gentleman, died of heart trouble sitting in his chair at his home at Cheshire last Saturday night. The burial was at Poplar Ridge, Tuesday. His wife preceded him but several adult children are left to mourn their loss.

[Note: from stone & Cogar research B. Dec. 25, 1838 & D. Jan. 6, 1908 - Unit Company I, 2nd W.Va. Vol. Cav.]

Gallipolis Bulletin
Jan. 10, 1908
Vol. XLI No. 10
Transcribed by Theresa E. Smith                                                                     Top of Page


Safford, Ella O.

In Memoriam
Headquarters Cadot Corps
Gallipolis, O., Dec. 1895
  
      Whereas, God in His all wise providence has called "to the other shore" our esteemed sister, Ella O. Safford, in whose death the Corps has sustained a loss:
      Resolved, That while we deplore the decease of our sister, Ella O. Safford, we bow in humble submission to the will of God; that, while there is another vacant chair in our circle, her loss is but another link in the golden chain that draws us nearer to the Gates of Pearl, nearer the Great White Throne, to the home not made with hands eternal in the Heavens.
      Resolved, That Cadot Corp, 185, extend to the husband and daughter our deepest sympathy and condolence.
      Resolved, That the charter be draped in mourning for thirty days, that a copy of these resolutions be sent to the family of our deceased sister, also be spread upon the records of our Corps.
Emma Morris
Ada Vanden
A.M. Entsminger
Committee

[Note: Buried in Mound Hill, Gallipolis Twp. - wife of J.R.- B. Sept 24, 1850 & D. Nov 26, 1895 - Unit Nurse]

Gallipolis Bulletin
Jan. 4, 1896
Vol. XXIX No.9
Transcribed by Theresa E. Smith


Safford, Phillip

     Died, in Green township, May 6, 1864, of Consumption, Phillip Safford, in the 21st year of his age. The deceased was one of our country's soldiers. He volunteered in the 4th Va. Infantry on its first organization for the three years' service, and remained with the regiment while in West Virginia, and during the principle [sic] part of its campaign in the South, up to the time of his prostration by disease. We view him as one of that throng of patriots, who, by their noble daring, have been as a covert from the threatening tempest of war to thousands in the North who enjoy peace in their dwellings. Oftimes when we heard of their achievements in beating back the tide of treason, how fondly have we hoped for, and joyfully anticipated the gentle flowings of peace. But he, with other thousands, has fallen ere the triumph of the right. His sufferings were protracted and severe, yet they were borne with patience and even cheerfulness.
     In the earlier part of his affliction he seemed to anticipate restoration to health; but when he found his end approaching, he was not left in despair. He had fled to the Rock of refuge, and realized in his affliction the sustaining and comforting grace of God. In bright anticipation of the better life, trusting the merits of Jesus, he sought and at length obtained, release from all his sufferings. His battles are fought and his victories won; and it is no weary war worn land that rewards his toil, but one delightful, all peaceful and serene. The sorrowing friends we can only point to Him who is as a hiding place from the wind, and a covert from the tempest; as rivers of water in a dry place, as the shadow of a great rock in a weary land. J.W.M.

The Gallipolis Journal
June 9, 1864
Transcribed by Eva Swain Hughes


Safford, J. Ross

Dr. J. R. Safford Died Monday
     Dr. J. Ross Safford, retired dentist, died early Monday morning at his residence on Third Avenue, after a long illness. He had been confined to his home and bed for months.
Dr. Safford was born in Green Township and was a son of Chellis Safford and a grandson of Robert Safford, a conspicuous and picturesque figure in the settlement of Gallipolis, and credited with chopping down the first tree here. Dr. Safford had two brothers and two sisters - Frank, John, Mrs. Martha Rose and Mary Safford - all of whom are dead.
     Dr. Safford would have been 75 years old on March 31. He was a soldier in the 60s, belonging to Co. B, 91st O.V.I. He was a successful dentist and practiced his profession here many years and for a brief time was located in McArthur.
     In 1869 he married Miss Ella Wood, who died years ago. To them was born one daughter, Lena, now a patient in the State Hospital at Athens. About three years ago he married Miss Elizabeth Muenz, who survives him, and who cared for him most tenderly during his illness.
     Dr. Safford was a genial, even-tempered, upright man and was highly esteemed by all who knew him. He was a Past Commander of the Rose Commandery, a Knight of Pythias and a member of the G.A.R.
     The funeral was conducted by Rev. Beery at the residence at 2 o'clock Wednesday afternoon. Burial at Mound Hill by Hayward.

[Note: Joseph Ross Safford - B. March 31, 1844 & D. March 10, 1919]

Gallipolis Bulletin
March 13, 1919
No 11, page 1
Transcribed by Theresa E. Smith                                                                     Top of Page


Sanford, Thomas Spencer

Captain Sanford Died Last Sunday
     Thomas Spencer Sanford was born February 1, 1845 and departed this life August 13, 1911, aged 66 years, 6 months and 12 days.
     He was united in marriage September 23, 1872, to Effie L. Anderson, who still survives him. He also leaves one sister, Mrs. Ella Cole of Marietta, and one brother, James of Honduras, Central America. He has been called upon to mourn the loss of his sister, Mrs. Hattie Racer and his brother, ??????, of Marietta since last Christmas.
     He spent about forty years of his life on the river either as master or pilot of a number of steamboats and was regarded as a most careful pilot by his employers. He has been retired from the river the past five years on account of failing health. Last November he was stricken with disease from which he could not recover, and since then he has been a great sufferer at times, though he never murmured or complained. He set us an example of patience in trouble and sufferings worthy to be followed.
His domestic life was of the happiest. He was a kind, devoted, true and affectionate husband. He was a good and true friend.
     In all the relations of life he was upright and honorable and his death is mourned by all who knew him. He believed in the Savior of men and had supreme faith in the goodness of God.
Capt. Sanford was also faithful to the call of his country during the Civil War. He served as fifer in Co.B, 148 O.V.I.
    The funeral services were held at his late home Tuesday afternoon, conducted by Rev. H.S. Meyer. His river friends acted as pall bearers. He was laid to rest in Gravel Hill Cemetery.

Gallipolis Bulletin
August 17, 1911
Transcribed by Theresa E. Smith


Saunders, David Levi

     David Levi Saunders, deceased, was born August 25, 1844, and departed this life June 3, 1913, aged 68 years, 7 months, 8 days. 
     He was united in marriage to Marietta Miller, February 4, 1869. To this union was born 8 children, 4 boys and 4 girls. Lily B. Kuhn, Germano, O., Alba S., Columbus, O., Clark W., Lisbon, O., William O., Columbus, O., Rosa F. Houck, Kanauga, O., Elva M. Wolf, Columbus, O., Jessie H. and Daisy E. both of Col., O., all of whom are living.  The mother died five years ago.
     He was enrolled Aug. 2, 1862, as fifer in Captain Blazer's Co. "A", 91st Reg. O.V.I.  to serve 3 years or during the war. He was discharged, June 24, 1865 at Cumberland, Maryland, as the war was then ended. He took part in 15 battles, among them being Cedar Creek, Fisher's Hill, Murfreesboro and Winchester. The most of his services were under the gallant Phil. Sheridan in the Shenandoah Valley. At his discharge he was presented with the silver fife that he had carried and used. One of his greatest pleasures in his declining years was to be present at all reunions, Fourths and Decorations. There he would play the old war-time patriotic tunes that never failed to send blood coursing faster through the veins of all his admiring hearers.      
     But now the old fifer is silent. No more will its mouthpiece be pressed by the lips, its notes pressed by the nimble finger tips of the old patriotic fifer. The lips are chilled and the fingers are clasped to his gallant breast that knoweth no more of war. He has gone to meet the loved one gone before.  During his life he was ever found as a champion of the right; no inquiries need ever be made as to where he stood. He suffered and died of the dread cancer, but he never complained of the will of the Master. He passed peacefully and painlessly away like unto him that sleepeth. His last words and message to his children was, "Live right and meet me in heaven," and he gave all the assurances possible that he was going there. He well could say, "I have fought a good fight, I have finished my course, I have kept the faith."

[Note: Buried in Dickey Chapel in Harrison Twp.]

Gallipolis Journal
June 22, 1913
Vol. 95, No. 26
Transcribed by Theresa E. Smith                                                                     Top of Page


Saunders, Hezekiah, H.

Death of Rev. Hezekiah H. Sanders
     Rev. Hezekiah H. Sanders, an old soldier of Crown City, died last Thursday morning, aged 71 years, 2 months and one day. He was a member of the 173rd regiment O.V.I., Co. B and was a faithful soldier. he became a member of the Baptist church when quite young and was engaged in the ministry for the past 35 years. He was a good, conscientious, christian.
     He is survived by his wife, three sons, M.H., Okey, and Harold, and by six daughters, Mrs. J.H. Grase, Mrs. A.M. Sanders, Mrs. Erie Cyrus, Mrs. J.L. Effingham, Mrs. W.G. Young and Miss Sadie.

[Note from death certificate - Buried in Saunders Cemetery in Lawrence County - B. July 6, 1840 & D. Sept. 7, 1911: Record found under Saunders]

Gallipolis Journal
Wednesday Sept. 13, 1911
Vol. 93, No.85
Transcribed by Theresa E. Smith

Saunders, Hezekiah H.

Rev. Saunders Dead
     Rev. Hezekiah H. Saunders, a Civil War veteran residing at Crown City, died last Thursday morning, September 7, 1911, aged 71 years. He leaves a wife and nine children as follows: Mrs. J.H. Grase of Ona, W.Va., S.M. Saunders of Green Bottom, W.Va., Mrs. E. Syrus of Crown City, Mrs. J.L. Effingham of Lesage, W.Va., N.H. Saunders of Charleston, Mrs. W.L. Young of Huntington, and Okey, Sadie and Harold at home; also one brother, Zachariah P. Saunders of Swanington, Ind. Mr. Saunders joined the Baptist Church when quite young and had been a minister of the gospel for 35 years. The family will have the sympathy of all in their affliction.

Gallipolis Bulletin
Sept. 14, 1911 No.36
Transcribed by Theresa E. Smith                                                                     Top of Page


Saunders, Jesse C.

     Jesse C. Saunders, Musician, aged 20, enlisted July 18th, 1861, from Guyan township, and served in Co. G, 4th WVVI. died of chronic diarrhea at St. Louis, Mo., June 29th, 1863—unmarried.

[Note: This is taken from a list of those who died in the war. One source says he died at St. Louis, Missouri but his regiment was in Virginia at that time, so his place and cause of death were most likely mixed up with another soldier's name. There were several names from this particular list that were involved in this mix-up. He served in Co. G, 4th West Virginia Volunteer Infantry.]

Gallipolis Journal
September 21, 1865
Transcribed by Eva Swain Hughes


Saunders, John H.

     One by one the nation's defenders are receiving the summons from on high, so let us be ready. Let us live up to our high privileges as God's freemen so that when our final summons shall come, it will not be taps, but reveille. Not taps for the darkness and the night of earth but the glorious reveille for the eternal morning; not taps to tell of cares over, sorrows passed, but reveille that gives a welcome to the camp of ever lasting peace where feet never grow weary, cares never come, sorrow never enters. The lights are not out. Earthly glories and triumphs pale before the light that shines about the great white throne. The armies of earth are mustering on the plains beyond the river. There in countless numbers are our comrades of the old days, who fought the fight and kept the faith, and now, the conflict over, wear the crown. We but bivouac here. Let us be so true in our comradeship, so earnest in our service, so loyal in our thoughts and actions to the great commander of all the armies of earth and heaven that amid the closing scenes of our earthly campaign and pilgrimage there shall be sounded for us not taps but reveille.
     John H. Saunders late a Second Lieutenant of Co. B, 173 Regiment Ohio Volunteer Infantry, departed this life on the 7th day of August 1910, being 85 years, six months and twenty six days old and was laid to rest in the family burying ground on the 8th day of August 1910. He leaves a wife and ten children, four sisters, two brothers and a host of other relatives and friends to mourn their loss. That he was widely known and beloved by all was fully attested by the multitude of people, with tear dimed eyes, in attendance at the funeral services.

[Note: John Harrison Saunders - from death certificate Buried in Sanders Cemetery in Lawrence Co, Ohio - B. Jan. 11, 1825 Fluvanna, Va.]

Gallipolis Journal
August 10, 1910
Transcribed by Theresa E. Smith                                                                     Top of Page


Saunders, Robert

Taps Sounds For County's Only Ex-Confederate
Robert Saunders Died At Raccoon Island Saturday - Funeral At Clay Chapel, At 10 o'clock This Forenoon.
     Robert Saunders, believed to be the only Confederate Soldier in the County, died Saturday at the home of his son, John Saunders, at Raccoon Island. He had been rather feeble for several weeks, but members of the family felt encouraged about his condition until last Tuesday then there was a turn for the worse.
     Funeral services were held at Clay Chapel at 10 o'clock today. Burial in Mound Hill Cemetery beside his wife, who died two years ago.
     On February 6 the Daughters of the Confederacy confered upon Mr. Saunders the Southern Cross of Honor - A unique ceremony witnessed by two Union Soldiers, M. C. Boice and Lafayette Gaston at Saunders home.  The presentation was made by Mrs. Eli Pigman and Mrs. John B. Alcorn, President and Vice President, respectfully of Dixie Chapter, (Columbus), D. of C.

Gallipolis Daily Tribune
Volume XXXVIII
Number 98
April 25, 1932
Gallipolis, Ohio

Transcribed By: MLT


[This companion piece was found from just two months before he died, and so it is presented here along with his obituary.]

Honor Conferred on Confederate Veteran
Union Vets Clasp Hands of Robert Saunders, Only "Johnny" in County
     The Southern Cross of Honor was conferred today on Robert Saunders, of Raccoon Island, by the Daughters of the Confederacy. Mrs. Margaret Crocker, Columbus, commander of the Ohio division of that organization; Mrs. Eli Pigman, president of Dixie Chapter, Columbus, and Mrs. John B. Alcorn, vice president, presented the badge at his home.
     Among those who witnessed the ceremony, unique in the annals of this county, were two old Union soldiers, Lafayette Gaston, Gallipolis, and M.C. Boice, Cheshire. Plans had been made to have the ceremony in the probate judge's office at 10:30. Mr. Saunders was communicated with last evening and said he would come. But illness prevented him making the trip; and when that was learned must of those who had come out for the ceremony decided to go to the Saunders home.
     Among those making the pilgramage, besides five already mentioned, were Mrs. W.L. Robinson, also a member of Daughters of Confederacy; Miss Emma Boice, Cheshire; Mrs. W.G. Sibley, Mrs. Harry Maddy, Mrs. Wayne Sanns and Mrs. Earl Mauck. Dr. A.B. Garrett, head of the local G.A.R. post, waited at the court room but could not accompany the others on the trip.
     Both Stars and Stripes and Stars and Bars were used in the ceremony, Mrs. Crocker saying that was required. Judge Clark supplied the former. Mr. Saunders fought under Lee but came to this county soon after
the War Between the States ended. It is believed he is the only Confederate veteran in the county. He is 85 and father of John and Sam Saunders.

[Note: There were other Confederate soldiers who lived in Gallia County, but perhaps all others had died by 1932. He died a few months later on April 23 and is buried at Mound Hill Cemetery.]

Gallipolis Daily Tribune
February 6, 1932
Transcribed by Henny Evans                                                                           Top of Page


Sawyer, Silas

     Mr. Silas Sawyer, a good soldier and citizen, belonging to the W. S. Hancock Post, G.A.R. died at the age of 66, at Centerville, last week, and was buried at the old Plus? Free Church, on Saturday.

Gallipolis Journal
April 17, 1899
Transcribed by Henny Evans


Schaefer, Christian H.

Death of Capt. C.H. Schaefer
     Capt. Christian H. Schaefer died at his home on Second Street, Sunday morning, November 28, 1897, aged 57 years.
     Deceased was the son of the late Jacob and Mary Schaefer, and was born in Pittsburgh, Pa., June 18, 1840, moving to Harrisburg, this county, with his parents in 1844. Ten years later, after the death of his father, they came to this city, where he entered the Gallia Academy, receiving his education at that institution.
     At the beginning of the late war he answered to the first call for troops, enlisting for three months service in Capt. C.C. Aleshire's company, at the expiration of which he re-enlisted for three years in Co. D, 56th O.V.I., serving as First Lieutenant until his honorable discharge, when he was veteranized and commissioned as Captain and put in charge of a military prison at New Orleans, serving there until July, 1866.
     After the war he engaged in various business enterprises in this city, being recognized among our leading business men. For the past fourteen years he has been employed in the capacity of traveling representative of the National Lead Co., and while in the discharge of duties he met with a runaway accident at Hamden, O., on October 12, 1894, receiving injuries which led to his death.
     On January 15, 1867, he was united in marriage to Miss Adeline E. Damrom, daughter of the late John G. Damron, Esq., and their union was blessed by three children, viz.: Mrs. Dr. H.C. Brown, Edward G. Schaefer, deceased, and Dr. H.E. Schaefer.
     Last February he was compelled, by failing health, to surrender his territory for awhile, hoping to be benefited by a vacation, but he grew worse, and two weeks ago he was taken bed fast, sinking rapidly until the end, which came at the above hour while he slept.
     He was a member of the Knights of Honor, military order of the Loyal Legion of the United States, and the United Commercial Travelers. He was also a member of the M.E. Church, a good Christian and a worthy citizen. His death is mourned by a legion of friends, who extend their sympathies to the bereaved family.
Capt. Schaefer's life was that of a noble man, generous to a fault, and his memory will ever be fresh in the minds of all who knew him.
     The funeral services were held at the M.E. Church Tuesday afternoon, at 1:30 o'clock, Rev. A.J. Hawk officiating. The remains were interred in the Pine Street Cemetery by Hayward & Son.

Gallipolis Bulletin
Dec. 4, 1897
Vol. XXXI, No. 3
Transcribed by Theresa E. Smith


Schaefer, Capt. Christian H.

Death of Capt. C.H. Schaefer
     In the death of Capt. C.H. Schaefer, which sad event occurred at his home on Second Street Sunday morning at 2 o'clock, this community suffers the loss of a man who has been one of its prominent and foremost citizens, the bereaved family a kind and considerate husband and father; his friends a true and loyal comrade. He was of a cordial disposition, of unassuming manner, and his worth was most appreciated where he was best known, and no duty was too onerous, no burden too heavy when it was borne for a friend.
     The funeral services will be held from the M.E. Church Tuesday afternoon at 1:30 o'clock, Rev, Hawk conducting the religious services and Hayward & Son the interment at Pine Street cemetery beside the parents of the deceased (Next line is unreadable).
     Deceased was born at Pittsburgh, Pa., June 18, 1840 and was a son of the late Jacob and Mary Schaefer. With his parents he came to Harrisburg, this county, in 1844, ten years later moving to this city with his mother. He received his education at the Academy and in '61 entered the war at the first call for three months' troups in Capt. C. C. Aleshire's company. At the expiration of that term he re-enlisted for three years in the 56th O.V.I., Co. D., and served as First Lieutenant. After his discharge he received the title of Captain in recognition of his military scholarship and was stationed at New Orleans in charge of a military prison, where he remained until the close of war.
     Returning to Gallipolis he embarked in the coal business with Capt. John Damron, and later became salesman and ??nior partner of the wholesale house of ???lliday & Miles. After the dissolution of this firm he accepted a position as ???esman for Allemong & Henking, remaining with them until '84, when he resigned his position for pecuniary reasons and became connected with the National Lead Co. It was while traveling that he encountered an accident in a runaway at Hamden, Oct 12, 1894, which caused injuries that were pro??tive of his death. He was married to Adeline E. Damron, daughter of the late Squire John Damron, January 15, 1867 and by their union three children were born, Mrs. H.C. Brown, Edgar G. Schaefer, and Dr. Earl Schaefer, the second named being dead. His health ?????him to give up traveling last February, and since his life has been ebbing ????y ever since. He was confined to bed two weeks, taking worse Saturday after supper and dying at the hour noted above. The end came while he slept and apparently without the sting ????. He was one of the first members of the official board of the M.E. Church. A life, well spent, has gone to ???? a well earned place in the Kingdom of God.

[Note: Buried in Pine Street Cemetery]

Gallipolis Journal
Tuesday Nov. 30, 1897
Vol LXIII No.6
Transcribed by Theresa E. Smith                                                                     Top of Page


Schenck, Joseph

Jos. Schenck Dead
     Jos. Schenck, who formerly lived here, died at Arlington, O., Saturday, at the residence of his daughter Mrs. Ella Payne, of bronchial pneumonia. He was in the seventies. He was a carpenter by trade, and followed the river. He was the father of Jos. C. Schenck of New York, who arrival [sic] at his bedside after the old gentleman's death.

[Note: He served as a Squirrel Hunter.]

Gallipolis Daily Tribune
March 7, 1901
Transcribed by Henny Evans


Scott, Alexander

IN MEMORY
     Alexander Scott was born June 3, 1844 and died April 1, 1926, aged 81 years, 9 months and 28 days.
He was the oldest son of Elisha and Elizabeth Fraser Scott, his entire life was spent on Old Kyger.
     December 30, 1866 he married Ellen Rife and to this union eight children were born, Jamie and Roy preceded their father in death. The surviving are Agnes, Charles, Emma, Ross, Laura and Harrison. Seventeen grand children and ten great grand children, also 1 brother and 3 sisters survive to cherish his memory.
     March 1866, during special services conducted by Rev. O.E. Baker, Mr. Scott gave his life to the service of God and united with the First Kyger as health permitted he was always found in his place at all church services. For a number of years he was a most faithful Superintendent of the Sunday School. His home was always open and all found a hearty welcome,
at his fireside.
     When our country became involved in the great Civil War, Mr. Scott responded to the call and on July 28, 1862 enlisted in Company B, 91st O.V.I. September 19, 1864 during the battle at Opequam, Virginia he was mustered out, having suffered many hardships.
     His devoted wife with whom he walked the pathway of life for almost sixty years is a fervent Christian and in this faith they sought to rear their family. There is surely no spot on earth more dear than a
Christian home where Christ is example to obedient followers and where the principles of integrity are preserved.
     Mr. Scott loved his children. He was justly proud of his grand children and deeply solicitous of their welfare. He leaves to all these the inheritance of an honest, upright life, more precious than rubies or gold for we believe him to have lived the life of a man of God. Emulate his virtues, cherish his memory and finally share him with eternal fellowship.

Card of Thanks
     We sincerely thank all who, so kindly assisted us in any way during, the sickness and death of our dear husband and father. Also Rev. Day for his consoling words and Undertaker Demain for his effecient service.
The World War and Spanish Soldiers fired Volley over grave at the Gravel Hill Cemetery. Wife and Children

Gallia Times
April 15, 1926
Transcribed by Henny Evans                                                                           Top of Page


Scott, John M.

     SCOTT - John M. Scott, of pneumonia, at his home in Coles County. Ill., February 8th, 1881, in the 47th year of his age.
     Mr. Scott was widely known as one of our best citizen, and his loss will be deeply felt in the community. He was born and raised and spent the greater portion of his life in Gallia county, Ohio. He began business life as a farmer with small means, and when the Rebellion broke out he was one of the first to respond to the call of his country. He enlisted in the service under Capt. John Evans for three years, and was in many a hard fought battle. Served his time out and had an honorable discharge. He returned home and renewed his occupation as a farmer, in Huntington township, in Gallia County, but never was able to do more than one to two days work in a week. Camp life almost used him up; he never was well after he came home.
     He was a man of much public spirit; he loved honesty and fair dealing. He was a member of the Freewill Baptist church for several years of his life and professed a hope in the Savior; lived a faithful member up to the time he left here in Oct., 1869, and since that time has been a member of the church where he died. The Community loses a good citizen and neighbor in his death and will feel deeply the stroke that has fallen upon it. More keenly will his departure be felt in the home circle. The household tie is broken. An affectionate husband and father has gone. Words of sympathy, however kindly tendered, cannot remove the pangs of grief like theirs. To Him alone, who can sustain his bereaved ones must they look for consolation in this, their time of sorrow.

Gallipolis Journal
Thursday March 10, 1881
Vol. XLVI, No. 18
Transcribed by Theresa E. Smith


Scott, Jordan

     Mr. Jordan Scott a nice old colored man and an old soldier and pensioner died at midnight Friday of old age. Hayward & Son have charge of the burial. He had been ill for two years. The funeral will be at his home beyond the Hess place near town, and burial at Pine Street. Rev. I.V. Bryant will conduct the funeral.

[Note: According to his tombstone in Pine Street Cemetery he was a member of the Co. F, 27th USCI.]

Gallipolis Daily Tribune
January 24, 1903
Transcribed by Henny Evans                                                                           Top of Page


Scott, Martin

Martin Scott
Answers the Final Summons After Long Suffering
     Death again has visited our town and another name added to the list of old soldiers who have answered the last roll call. The spirit of Uncle Martin Scott winged its flight to the heavenly home Wednesday, July 10, 1907, at 11 o'clock A.M. He had been making a gallant fight against the ravages of disease for several months and for the past week his life has hung in the balance. Slowly but surely the sands of life kept slipping from under his weary feet until death ended all.
     His death was due principally to chronic disease contracted during the war, coupled with infirmities of old age, being in his 82nd year at the time of his death.
     He is survived by his aged companion and several children, all of who were at his bedside at the time of his death, with the exception of his son Richard.
     The funeral was held last Friday at 9 a.m. at the Disciple Church, conducted by Elder W.H. Devore, assisted by Rev. W.N. Harkins. The internment took place at the Woods Cemetery.....Leader.

[Note: from Cogar Research...Served in Co. M, 7th OVC]

Gallipolis Bulletin
July 19, 1907 Vol. XXXX No. 37
Transcribed by F.K. BrownScott, Martin

Death of Martin Scott
     Mr. Martin Scott of Vinton, one of our old bridge builders, a fine old gentleman and 83 years old died Wednesday, leaving a wife and three sons John of Cheshire, Richard, of Columbus, and Elias at Ewington, and perhaps others.

Gallipolis Weekly Tribune
July 19, 1907
Transcribed by Henny Evans                                                                           Top of Page 


Sealy, Simeon

Died at Athens
     Simeon Sealy (Sealey), an old soldier, who was adjudged insane and sent to the Athens Hospital a week ago today, died there this morning. Judge Ingels was notified by telegram of the sad event.

Note: Stone: Mina Chapel in Green Township...Sealey....born July 10, 1840; died Jan. 7, 1899. Served in the Civil War in Co. F, 33rd Reg. OVI]

Gallipolis Journal
Wednesday, Jan. 18, 1899 (Vo XLIV No. 9)
Transcribed by F.K. Brown


Searls, Levi

Taps Sound For Levi Searls Of Kyger, Marion
     Levi Searls, a native of Kyger and a soldier for the Union, died at 9 o'clock this morning at the home of a daughter in Marion. The body will be brought back to Kyger for burial, according to word that came from Marion via Kyger to The Tribune.
     Mr. Searls was 87 or 88 years old and had always enjoyed good health except perhaps in recent weeks. From early manhood until about a decade ago he operated a blacksmith shop at Kyger. Since his retirement he had spent most of his time with his children in northern Ohio. He was a jolly, quaint, quiet, unassuming, religious man and all his life was a general favorite among young and old alike.
His death leaves M. C. Boice the sole survivor of the once numerically strong Charles A. Lyon post, G. A. R., at Kyger.
     Mr. Searls was the father of 12 or 13 children, some of whom preceded him in death. Among the surviving children are William A., Galion, O.; Arthur, of near Kyger; George W., Eno; Garfield, of near Cheshire.

Gallipolis Tribune
April 25, 1934
Transcribed by J. Farley                                                                                  Top of Page


Shaner, E. G.

Death of E. G. Shaner
     We learn with great regret of the death of Mr. E. G. Shaner, of Vinton.  The sad event occuring at his home at Vinton Wednesdayafternoon February 9, 1898.  He had been in failing health for a long
time occassioned by hardship and exposure as a soldier in the service of his Country, and for which he recieved a large pension, we believe $72 a month.  He kept hotel in Vinton for a long time and was known far and near as a genial hospitable landlord.
     He was of a joviel, happy disposition that was like sunshine in whatever company he was in.  For years he had been a Justice of the Peace, a member of the Soldier's Relief Commission, a consistent
Church member and every one who knew him esteemed him.  He leaves a widow and two daughters, one who is married, Mrs. Isaac Evans.  They will have the sympathy of many friends in the loss of an affectionate parent and companion.  His funeral services will take place Friday at one o'clock under the direction of the G. A. R.  Peace be with him forevermore.

Gallipolis Daily Tribune
Volume IX
Number 36
February 19, 1898
Gallipolis, Ohio

Transcribed by: MLT


Death of Mayor Shaner
He Was An Honored And Respected Man And His Death Is Deeply Mourned
     All Vinton was bowed in sorrow last Thursday over the taken from this life of "Squire" Eli G. Shaner, Mayor of that village and a man of noble impulses, generous and true. Vinton looses a good citizen and Gallia County a stalwart republican and a loved, honored and respected resident.
     The ruthless hand of death closed his life at 2:40 o'clock Wednesday afternoon, Feb. 9, 1898. His funeral occurred Friday afternoon at 1 o'clock at the M.E. Church, Rev. W.J. Fulton officiating and the final disposition of his remains being made at Mt. Tabor Cemetery.
     Deceased was a native of Ohio and was aged about 60 years. He served in the Federal Army during the war in a Missouri Regiment and at the close of the war located in this county. His trade was that of a blacksmith and until disease became so onerous that he was compelled to give up his work the merry ring of his anvil was a familiar sound to Vintonians. It was about 10 years ago that he was obliged to give up his trade and ever since he has suffered from heart trouble superinduced by rheumatism, the former, however causing his death. Six years ago he had the distinction of being elected Mayor of Vinton, the first ever named. He was a Justice of the Peace for 12 years and a Trustee of Huntington Township for four years.
     Another office of trust he holds is that of President of the Soldiers' Relief Commission, a board to look after indigent soldiers. This he has held for several years, the other members of the Commission being Hon. Amos Clark and Squire J.M. Alexander.
     He was a member of Vinton Lodge F & A.M. and the G.A.R. and both lodges have charge of the funeral, each being invited to participate in the exercises.
     Deceased married Miss Emeline Atkison, daughter of Squire John Atkinson, a prominent farmer of Huntington Township, thirty years ago. Their union was blessed by the birth of three children, all grown daughters, who are Mrs. Isaac Evans, Mrs. Maggie Steele and Miss Cora Shaner.
     During the last year "Squire" Shaner was landlord of a boarding house. His house always had the warmth of cordiality and good cheer for all. He has been called to his reward for a long and upright life and the Journal with his friends, regret proudly that he has been called away.

Gallipolis Journal
Feb. 15, 1898
Transcribed by F.K. Brown                                                                             Top of Page


Sharp, Henry J.

Enlisted in Gallia at Age of 15
     Dr. H.J. Sharp, one-time resident of Franklin county and for 45 years a leading citizen of London, Ohio, who died at his home in that town Wednesday at the age of 70 years, was buried at Kirkwood Saturday. Dr. Sharp, at the age of 15 years, enlisted in the Ohio National guard at the outbreak of the civil war and saw service in Ohio during the raids of Generals Wise and Morgan, and later in West Virginia.
     Following the war, his parents moved from Gallia county to Franklin county and the young veteran became a student at Ohio Wesleyan university at Delaware, where he was a classmate of Senator J.B. Foraker. Leaving Delaware in 1868, he took up the study of medicine with Dr. J.W. Hamilton, father of Drs. W.J. and Charles Hamilton, of Columbus, and graduated from Starling Medical college in 1871.
     He is survived by three sons, Thomas Leighton Sharp of Columbus, Dr. Wilfrid D. Sharp, of Cleveland, and Henry J. Sharp of Pittsburgh.

[Note: He was born March 2, 1845 and died January 19, 1916 according to his death certificate. He served in Co. F, 141st Ohio Volunteer Infantry.]

Gallia Times
January 26, 1916
Transcribed by Henny Evans


Shaver, Abram C., Judge

Death of A.C. Shaver
     Mrs. R.W. Henley received a telegram Saturday of the death of her cousin, A.C. Shaver of East Bank, W.Va. Friday. Funeral services were held Sunday, October 14, 1923. Mr. Shaver was reared at Porter, O., and had many relatives and friends in this county.

[Note: He served in Co. E, 141st Ohio Volunteer Infantry as a Corporal and also in Co. C, 194th Ohio Volunteer Infantry as a Private. He was born in July 1843 and is buried in the IOOF Cemetery in Kanawha County, West Virginia. According to P.T. Wall he was a Judge in East Bank, West Virginia.

Gallipolis Daily Tribune
October 15, 1923
Transcribed by Henny Evans


Shaver, John

In Memoriam
     Mr. John Shaver, who was born April 16, 1828; died Sept. 5, 1904, aged 76 years, 4 months and 19 days, after a lingering illness during that time his suffering was intense. We have the consolation to believe his sufferings here are ended and he is at rest with God. He enlisted in the Civil Service [War] May 1864 and was a gallant soldier.
     He was married to Isabelle McKoon Oct. 17, 1854. To this union was born 8 children, 4 boys and 4 girls. One girl has preceded him to that better world. He joined the Freewill Baptist Church at the age of 16 and he lived as a true and faithful member. He leaves a wife and 7 children to mourn their loss. He was a kind and obedient husband and a loving father.

[note: buried in Rife Cemetery in Addison Township. From Cogar research: Co. E, 141st OVI]

Gallipolis Tribune
Sept. 7, 1904 [Vol. XVII, No. 272]
Transcribed by F.K. Brown


Shaver, William E.

William E. Shaver of Porter Dies Saturday Night
Soldier and Good Citizen
     William Edward Shaver of Porter, died at his residence Saturday night after several weeks illness from a paralytic affection. He was in his 70th year and had for many years been active in the affairs of his community. He was an ardent Republican, a staunch foe of slavery and at the beginning of the Civil War enlisted in the 19th regiment U.S. I. and served three years with the Army of the Potomac and was twice wounded. His record in the army was exceptionally good and he saw much hard service.
     He is survived by his wife, who was Miss Caroline Ralston and by three brothers, Thomas of Morgan; James of Springfield Township and A.C. of Red Bank, WV and one sister, Mrs. John Furgeson of Campaign.
     The funeral services were held at the residence at 2 o'clock yesterday afternoon and were conducted by Rev. W.J. Fulton. Burial at the Long Cemetery by undertaker Butler of Vinton under the auspices of the Vinton Lodge of Masons and the G.A.R.

[note: Death Certificate: Born Feb. 10, 1842; died May 27, 1911]

Gallipolis Journal
Wed. May 31, 1911 [Vol. 93, No. 81]
Transcribed by F.K. Brown                                                                             Top of Page


Shaver, William Taylor

Death of Mr. Shaver
     Mr. William T.Shaver of Cheshire well-known here, died Saturday morning, January 12th, 1907, aged 65 or 66 years. He was buried at Gravel Hill cemetery Monday afternoon. His funeral services were conducted by Rev. W.F. Fulton and his burial by Stansbury of Middleport. He was an old soldier in the war for the Union and he left a widow and son H.E. Shaver and one daughter Mrs. Dr. C.W. Ely. He was a retired farmer and a nice old gentleman.

[Note: He served in Co. E, 141st OVI.]

Gallipolis Daily Tribune
January 16, 1907
Transcribed by Henny Evans


Sheets, Brice Hannan

Prominent Guyan Township Farmer
Brice H. Sheets, Died Last Thursday
     Thursday night, Brice H. Sheets of near Yoho died from an attack of heart failure in his 79th year. He had been affected with heart trouble for some years and his death was not unexpected. Until a week ago, he had been a resident of this city for two years. Mr. Sheets formerly owned a large farm, which he divided among his children upon moving to this city and he was quite well to do, having been a man of great energy. He was a soldier in the Civil War and a member of the Missionary Baptist Church.
     He is survived by his wife and four sons and four daughters, Rev. Ira J. of Guyan, Elza S., of this city, Alphonso of Guyan, Silas of Huntington, Mrs. Ellsworth Hineman, Mrs. Charles Bevan and Mrs. J. H. Hineman of Crown City and Miss Etta at home. Also by one brother, W. J. Sheets.
     The funeral services were held at the Mercerville Baptist Church at 10 a.m., Sunday, conducted by Rev. N. B. Burnett. Burial at the church cemetery, by Undertaker Stevers.

[Note: Civil War Soldier – Distinguished Service, Co. G, 195 th Infantry Regiment, Ohio. Born Feb. 28, 1834, Mercerville, d. Apr. 4, 1912; age 78 years, parents William F. Sheets and Elizabeth Henry; married Apr. 29, 1855, Gallia, wife Samantha Wilcoxon.]

Gallipolis Journal
Wednesday, Apr. 10, 1912, front page
Transcribed by Judy Free and F. K. Brown


Sheets, Brice Hannan

DEATH OF BRICE H. SHEETS
     Mr. Brice H. Sheets, of Guyan Township, briefly mentioned Friday as having died Thursday, was in his 79th year and is survived by his brother, Mr. W. J. Sheets, wife and sons, Rev. Ira J. Sheets, Elza S., Silas and Alphonso, and daughters, Mrs. J. H. Hineman, Mrs. Ellsworth Hineman, Mrs. Charles Bevan and Miss Etta at home. He belonged to the Missionary Baptist Church, and was a prosperous farmer and had a large farm before dividing it up with his children. He was a pleasant and a very agreeable man, an old Civil War Veteran and a man well liked everywhere.
     His funeral services will be conducted at the Mercerville Baptist Church, Sunday at 10 o'clock, and the burial at Mercerville Cemetery by Undertaker Stevers. Mr. Denver Sheets, his grandson, is here to attend the funeral services. He had lived in town for a couple of years until about three weeks ago, when he moved to his farm.

The Gallipolis Tribune
Apr. 12, 1912, front page
Transcribed by Judy Free                                                                                Top of Page


Sheets, James Harvey

Died
     At Crown City, Ohio, Friday, November 15, 1895 at 11:30 o'clock a.m. James Harvey Sheets, aged 58 years. Mr. Sheets had been in poor health for a long time, caused by exposure in the army, he having served in the 33rd O.V.I., one of the bravest and most active regiments of the war. He was a brave soldier, a good citizen, without an enemy in the world that we know of.
     His burial took place at Guyan Townshouse, Saturday forenoon at 10 o'clock.
     Peace to his ashes.

Gallipolis Journal
Wed., Nov. 20, 1895 [Vol. LXI, No. 4]
Transcribed by F.K. Brown


Sheets, Samuel M.

Sudden Death
     Samuel M. Sheets, living near Crown City, was called suddenly from earth Saturday morning. He was in attendance at a lawsuit at that village and while listening to the testimony fell unconscious. Vain efforts were made to revive him, and he died within a short time. His untimely death was due to apoplexy.
     Deceased was a member of the 66th and 57th OVI, and known quite extensively. Within a years time he has lost his two brothers. Mr. Sheets was about 60 yrs. of age. Burial was Sun. at the Crown City Cemetery.

[Note: Born Aug. 08, 1842, Gallia, parents George H. Sheets, Jr. and Anna Henry; married Mar. 18, 1863, Gallia, to Sarah Franklin Wilcoxon.]

Gallipolis Journal
Tuesday, June 09, 1896
Transcribed by Judy Free                                                                                Top of Page


Sheets, William F.

William F. Sheets Of Guyan Township Dies Sunday Night In His 65th Year
Burial Yesterday Morning
     William Frank Sheets of Guyan Township died about 10 o'clock Sunday night after an illness of about three months. He had suffered from a beating of the head during that time and death is thought to have been due this generally weakened condition.
     He was born March 20, 1846 and was 64 years, 11 months and 6 days old. He was the eldest son of John H. and Jane Fowler Sheets and is survived by his wife, whose maiden name was Elizabeth A. Saunders and by three sons, Lorenzo D, now teaching in WV; Asa A at home and Erie of Lecta and three daughters, Mrs. William Fraley of Maple Shade; Mrs. Minnie Miller, wife of Dr. E.N. Miller of Scott Town; Lawrence County and Miss Nora at home. He is also survived by seven brothers, Recorder L.M. Sheets, E.W. of Hilton; Brice M of Crown City; John J. of Northup; James S. of Crown City; Luther W of Platform and Caony F. of Atwood, IL and by two sisters, Mrs. Elizabeth F.Niday of Green Township and Mrs. Mary C. Barens of Atwood, IL.
     Mr. Sheets served in the 173rd Regiment Co. B O.V.I. for a period of one year during the Civil War. He was a prosperous farmer, a former teacher and merchant and had been Justice of the Peace for the past 15 or 20 years. He was a good citizen and highly respected by all of his friends and acquaintances.
     The funeral services were held at Siloam Church yesterday morning at 10 o'clock, services conducted by Rev. N.B. Barnett. Burial at the family cemetery by Undertaker Meyers of Sand Fork.

Gallipolis Journal
March 1, 1911
Vol 93; No. 74

Prominent Farmer Has Passed Away
     William Franklin Sheets died at his home in Guyan Township Saturday, Feb. 25, aged 64 years and 11 months. He was a soldier in the Civil War, serving in Company B, 173rd. O.V.I.
     Mr. Sheets was a son of John H and Jane Fowler Sheets. He is survived by his wife, Elizabeth Saunders Sheets, three sons, Lorenzo D., West Virginia; Asa at home and Erie of Lecta and three daughters, Mrs. William Fraley of Maple Shade; Mrs. Minnie Miller, wife of Dr. E. N. Miller of Scott Town, Lawrence County and Miss Nora at home. He is also survived by seven brothers, County Recorder L.M. Sheets, E.W. of Hilton, Brice M of Crown City; John J. of Northup; James S. of Northup; Luther W of Platform; C.F. of Atwood, IL. [note: sisters not mentioned in this article].
     The well known farmer and had been a merchant and teacher and also served serval terms as Justice of the Peace. He was an upright, honorable man, being held in high esteem by the public general.
     The services were held at the Siloam Church Tuesday morning by Rev. E.L. Sheets of [missing] church [note: minister differs from other article]
     Six comrades from the G.A.R. of which he was a member acted as pall bearers and the remains were interred in the family burying ground by Undertaker Meyers of Sand Fork.

Gallipolis Bulletin
March 3, 1911 no. 9

In Memory of Wm. Frank Sheets
     Who was born March 20, 1846 and departed this life Feb. 26, 1911 aged 64 years, 11 months and 6 days. He was the eldest son of John H. and Jane Fowler Sheets
     He was united in marriage to Elizabeth A. Saunders and to this union was born nine children; three of who have preceded their father to that better land. He is survived by his wife, three sons, Lorenzo D., Asa A and Erie and three daughters, Mrs. William Fraley, Mrs Minnie Miler and Miss Nora; also by seven brothers and two sisters.
     He was one of those who served in the Civil War in 173 Regiment Co. B, O.V.I. Many years ago he professed a hope in Christ Jesus and a life to come and has lived in the faith of the fulfillment of that hope and to those who have been left behind to mourn the loss of husband, father and friend come the consolation that they weep not as those who have no hope and to our ears comes that thought that the Master gave, "He is not dead but sleepeth," and how calm and blessed is that sleep when our loved one falls asleep in the arms of Jesus. All that those who mourn his loss can do is to live so as to be ready when the summons come to meet on that shore where the redeemed shall part no more.
     Funeral services were conducted at Siloam Church Feb. 28 at 10 A.M., Rev. E.L. Sheets having charge of the services. Burial at the family cemetery by Meyers.

Gallipolis Journal
Wed., March 15, 1911
Vol 93, No 78
Transcribed by F.K. Brown                                                                              Top of Page


Sheets, William J.

IN MEMORY
     The funeral services of the late William J. Sheets were held at the Missionary Baptist Church of Mercerville, Wednesday, Dec. 21 and conducted by Rev. N.B. Burnett.  Burial was at Mercerville Cemetery by J.W. Stevers.
     Mr. Sheets was born March 10, 1832 and died Dec. 21, 1913, aged 81 years, 9 months and 11 days.  He was united in marriage to Melvina Johnson and to this union were born 10 children, 7 sons and 3 daughters, all of whom survive.
     He was converted and united with the Missionary Baptist Church over 50 years ago and lived a consistent Christian life until death.  He was one of the constituted members of Siloam Church.
     He was also a soldier, having enlisted in Co. G., 195th O.V.I., Captain Porter's company, Feb. 13, 1865 and was honorably discharged on Dec. 18, 1865.  
     He was taken ill with pneumonia about two months ago and everything that kind hands could do for him was done, to no avail.  He gradually grew weaker and weaker until the end came.  He never murmured or complained, but bore his suffering with patience.  When asked how he was, would always say getting along all right.  
     He leaves an aged widow, 7 sons, 3 daughters and 35 grandchildren and a host of relatives and friends to mourn their loss. He has gone to join the many loved ones awaiting him where peace and joy never end and parting is no more.
     The pall bearers at his funeral were his six youngest sons, Charles E., William H., Elmer E., Ulysses G., Ernest L. and Alba L.

A precious one from us has gone,
A voice we love is stilled.
A place is vacant in our home
Which never can be filled.

A Son

Gallipolis Journal
Jan. 2, 1914
Transcribed by F.K. Brown


Sheline, Michael

War Veteran Dead
     Michael Sheline, 78, a Civil War veteran, died at his home in East Gallipolis Friday. He leaves his wife and five adult children, the latter all of Mason County,
W.Va. The funeral was Saturday.

[Note: He is buried in Pine Street Cemetery with dates March 28, 1848 to November 26, 1920. He served in Co. B, 4th W.V.V.I. and in Co. C, 13th W.V.V.I. Dates come from the obituary. No stone.]

Gallia Times
December 2, 1920
Transcribed by Henny Evans                                                                           Top of Page


Shenefield, John

FUNERAL FOR JOHN SHENEFIELD
     H.K. Butler conducted the funeral Saturday morning at Alice for Mr. John Shenefield, whose body arrived there from his home in Florida Friday evening.  His death occurred on Dec. 10 and the body was accompanied here by his son, John Shenefield, Jr.
     Rev. McCoy had charge of the funeral services and the burial at Franklin Cemetery beside his wife whose remains were also brought her from Florida about one year ago.
     Mr. Shenefield was 79 years of age, a Civil War veteran and one who will be remembered by many friends,having spent the greater part of his life in this neighborhood, having lived at Ewington.

[Note: Stone reading for birth was 1847, but subtracting 79 from 1921 equals 1842, which is a more reasonable age for a Civil War soldier.]

Gallia Times
Gallipolis, Ohio
Dec. 22, 1921
Transcribed by F.K. Brown


Shenefield, Joseph

DEATH OF AN OLD SOLDIER
     Joseph Shenefield of near Rowellsville, died last Friday after an illness of five or six years.  He was about 65 years of age and served, we believe, in the 91st O.V.I. during the Civil War.
     He is survived by his wife and two children.
     The funeral services were held at Pine Grove Church Sunday morning at ten o'clock.  Burial at the church cemetery by Butler of Vinton.

Gallipolis Journal
Jan. 24, 1912
Transcribed by F.K. Brown                                                                             Top of Page


Shepard, Henry J.

Sudden Death
of Mr. Henry J. Shepard, a Well Known Citizen
     Mr. Henry J. Shepard, living on a nice farm three miles up the river, off the river road, died suddenly last Saturday, May 20, 1905, with heart failure and aged 83 years last February. The funeral services will be conducted from his late residence Tuesday afternoon at 1 o'clock by Rev. Harry B. Lewis, of Grace M.E. Church, the interment by Hayward & Son at Mound Hill.
     Mr. Shepard is survived by his wife and three daughters Mrs. Belle Rust at home, Mrs. Annie Pierce of New York City, and Mrs. Lizzie Mossman of Huntington. He is also survived by one sister, Mrs. Dr. John Sanns of California, the last surviving child of his father's family of eleven.
     He was a son of Calvin Shepard who was the founder, one might say, of Methodism in this city. Long before they had a church the early Methodists held services at his house, and when the first church was built he was the promoter and the first man at the head of it. Mr. Shepard's wife was a niece of the late Dr. S.C. Bailey, of the Bailey & Maguet drug store, away back before and after the war, and made her home with her uncle and they were married there.
     Mr. Shepard's death came as a great surprise to his friends who met him in town Friday, the day before his death. Even Saturday he had knocked about on his farm and worked a little. He ate supper, but complained of not feeling well, and of being chilly. He laid down upon a lounge and was covered well and other efforts were made to warm him. His serious condition was not realized at all. He raised up and said he believed he would be more comfortable to turn over and he was assisted to do so. With this effort a change seemed to come over him and a physician was called who went with all haste, but he had expired when he arrived. Mr. Shepard was regarded highly and had many friends and his family will have the sympathy of all in their sorrow.

[Note: He served as a Squirrel Hunter.]

Gallipolis Daily Tribune
May 22, 1905
Transcribed by Henny Evans


Shepard, John Thomas

John Shepard Dead
     John Thomas Shepard, aged 70 years, passed away at his home in Gallipolis last Thursday in the same house in which he was born. Mr. Shepard was a son of John B. and Harriet Shepard, and was educated as a druggist, but did not follow the profession. For many years he was employed at the Gill produce house. He is survived by one sister, Margaret. The funeral was Saturday.

[Note: He was born May 16, 1846 and died January 27,1916. He served as a Squirrel Hunter.]

Gallia Times
February 2, 1916
Transcribed by Henny Evans


Sheppard, William Addison

     William A. Shepherd was born July 6, 1823 in Washington County, Virginia. He married Elizabeth Ewing in 1846 and they lived in Gallia County. They moved to Van Buren County, Iowa but returned to Ohio wherein August 1862 he enlisted in Co. K, 60th Ohio Volunteer Infantry. He was captured at Harper's Ferry and discharged in November 1862. In 1865 he enlisted again from March to September as a baker in Co. C, 188th Ohio Volunteer Infantry.
     He later moved to Illinois, then Kansas and finally to Colorado. He saw little of his family again and remarried without divorce to Margaret Custer Short. Later he reunited with one daughter after she discovered he was still alive. He died October 2, 1903 in Hotchkiss, Delta County, Colorado.

Created obit from Nancy Hank Ewing research and soldier records
October 2, 1903
Created by Henny Evans


Shields, Wm.

DEATH OF WM. SHIELDS
Vinton Leader
     Death's summons came to our townsman Wm. Shields yesterday morning about eight o'clock after a long and painful illness.  Mr. Shields has been in declining health for several months with a complication of ailments and about six weeks ago underwent an operation in a Columbus hospital with the hope of improving his condition.  The operation was a success and for a time hopes were entertained for his recovery; but it was soon seen that his afflictions were gradually preying on his once strong constitution.  He fought with heroic bravery against the grim monster, but finally had to yield.
     He was a soldier in the Civil War and at the time of his death was 66 years of age.  He was a good citizen and his death will be sadly mourned.
     Besides his companion, who is also in rather poor health, he is survived by the following children: Mrs. E.J. Long of Alma, Nebraska; Mrs. Floyd Turner of Toledo Ohio; Charles Shields of Nebraska, John of Litchfield, MI; Bert of Columbus; Frank of Vinton and Robert yet at home.
     The funeral was held Friday at the Brush Church.  The G.A.R. Post, of which the deceased was an honored member, had charge of the funeral.

[note: Bried in Brush Cemetery, Huntington Township. Born July 17, 1846; Died: Nov. 13, 1912]

Gallipolis Journal
Wed. Nov. 20, 1912  [Vol 94, No. 34]
Transcribed by F.K. Brown


Shoemaker, Jacob

JACOB SHOEMAKER DEAD
     Jacob Shoemaker, an old soldier of Co. H., 13th. O.V.I., died at his home on Poplar Ridge Tuesday, Sept. 16.  He was born in Cheshire Township, Feb. 28, 1844 and was therefore in his 76th. year.
     On Dec. 28, 1875, he married Matilda Siders.  To them were born 8 children, one of whom, Jessie, is dead.  The widow and the following children survive: Mrs. Edward Jones of Poplar Ridge; Mrs. Ella Scott, Cheshire; Clell of Marion; Alice, Mary, George and William at home.
     For 30 years he had been rather helpless and unable to walk, but bore his afflictions with patience and fortitude.  He was a faithful member of the Freewill Baptist Church.
     Rev. Y.H.E. Reed conducted the funeral Wednesday afternoon.  Burial was in Lemley Cemetery [Cheshire Township]

[note: Death Certificate: Parents George Shoemaker and Malinda Will]

Gallipolis Bulletin
Sept. 25, 1919

IN MEMORY
     Jacob Shoemaker was born Feb. 29, 1844, in Cheshire Township, Gallia County and departed this life at his home on Poplar Ridge, Sept. 16, 1919, aged 75 years, 6 months and 19 days.
     On Dec. 28, 1875, he was united in marriage to Matilda Siders.  To them were born eight children: Mrs. Edward Jones of Poplar Ridge; Mrs. Ella Scott of Cheshire; Clell of Marion; Alice, Mary, George and William at home.  A daughter, Jessie, preceded him to the Great Beyond.
     He was a kind father and a loving husband and a good neighbor always ready to help those in need.
     When quite young he joined the Free Will Baptist Church and was always faithful in attendance at church and Sunday school when health permitted. 
     He served his country in the Civil War in Company H, 13th. Ohio.  He had not walked for 30 years but bore his sickness with patience. All was done that true hearts and loving hands could do but God thought it best to take him home.

Now the ties of life are broken,
Amid our sorrows and our sighs,
Never more on earth we'll meet him,
But we shall beyond the skies.

He with Christ has gone before us,
Never more on earth to roam,
He'll be waiting, watching, longing,
For the dear ones left at home.

Father's gone but not forgotten,
To that land so bright and fair,
So be ready friends and loved ones,
And be sure you meet him there.

The Gallia Times
Gallipolis, Ohio
Wed., Sept. 24, 1919
Transcribed by F.K. Brown                                                                              Top of Page


Shoemaker, Moses

Money Disappears
Shortly Before Death of Moses Shoemaker Friday Morning
     The mysterious desappearance of a large sum of money marked the death of Moses Shoemaker of near Malaby in Cheshire Tp. Mr. Shoemaker died last Friday morning and the day before his death, so it is said, spoke about such money as he had in the house. He was 77 years of age and for years had drawn $30 per month pension, the greater portion of which he is believed to have hoarded. His savings were kept in a small tin box, in a bureau drawer and were wrapped in a read bandanna handkerchief. Sometime before the death of Mr. Shoemaker the drawer was rifled by an unknown person and for some reason the money was unwrapped and the handkerchief left behind. There is no knowledge as to the exact time of the theft, though it was sometime Thursday. The sum extracted is variously estimated as between $1,500 and $2,000.
     Mr. Shoemaker had been ill for some time with heart trouble and enlargement of the liver. He was a soldier in the Civil War and served in the 78th Regiment O.V.I., and was with Sherman on his March to the sea. He was a son of George Shoemaker and is survived by his wife and eight children. He was married five times and his widow was formerly the wife of his deceased brother John. The children surviving are, William of Mechanicsburg, John of Columbus, Isaiah S. of this county, who is blind, Mrs. Warren Coughenour of near this city, Mrs. Clemma Minor of this city, Mrs. Rosella DeWitt of W. Va. and Mrs Millie Roush.
     The funeral services were held Sunday morning at 10 o'clock and were conducted by Rev. Sheritt.

Gallipolis Journal
Wednesday, February 8, 1911
Vol. 93 No. 76

Moses Shoemaker Dead
     Moses Shoemaker of Cheshire township, residing on Poplar Ridge, died Tuesday morning, Feb. 3, 1911, of a complication of troubles. His funeral was held Sunday at his home at 10 a.m. His burial was at Poplar Ridge cemetery. He is survived by a wife and several adult children. He left a brother Jacob also. He was an old soldier of the Civil War and a member of the G.A.R. Post at Kyger and his burial was under their direction. He was a nice old gentleman generally well liked and was about 70 years old.

Gallipolis Bulletin
February 10, 1911
Transcribed by Jan Rader


Short, Henry

Henry Short
     Mr. Henry Short died at the residence of his daughter Mrs. Doss Schenck at Cincinnati Thursday. The remains will be brought here for burial Friday evening. Mr. Short was a resident of Gallipolis for many years and in his early days was employed in the Furniture factory. He was a veteran of the Civil War and drew a pension. He leaves four children, Mrs. Wm. Gatewood, Mrs. Doss Schenck, Sid and Frank Short. He was a fine old gentleman and had many friends who will regret his end. We learn of his death just as we go to press and have no particulars.

[Note: Cemetery not known; B. 1830, D. Sept. 1907; Unit Co. D, 6th Indiana Infantry]

Gallipolis Bulletin
September 20, 1907
Vol. XXXX No. 46
Transcribed by Jan Rader                                                                                  

Short, Henry H.

Funeral of Henry H. Short
     The funeral of Henry H. Short was conducted at 9 a.m. Sunday by the Rev. Thos. Maguire, at the Pine Street cemetery. Interment by Wetherholt.
     Mr. Short was born at Madison, Ind., Sept. 27, 1827. In 1853 he married Martha Reynolds, and their family consisted of Frank H. Short of Columbus, Mrs. Georgia L. Schenck of Cincinnati, Mrs. W.L. Gatewood of this city, and Sidney A. Short of Orange, Texas. All were present at the funeral except the last mentioned.
     Mr. Short was the Lieutentant of an Indiana company during the Civil War, and since the death of his wife in 1894, resided with his daughter in this city. He died at the home of his daughter in Cincinnati at 6 p.m., Spet. 18, 1907.

Gallipolis Daily Tribune
September 23, 1907
Transcribed by Henny Evans                                                                           Top of Page


Short, James

James Short Dead
     James Short, of Sandfork, formerly a resident of this city, died Wednesday night after a long illness. He was an old soldier, a member of Company B, 193rd O.V.I. He is survived by two grown daughters and one son. The funeral services were conducted last Friday, burial at Houck cemetery.

Gallipolis Bulletin
July 27, 1911
No. 29
Transcribed by Jan Rader


Shuler, Alexander

Obituary
     At the regular meeting of Arcanum Lodge, No. 493 K. of P., the following resolutions on the death of Brother Alexander Shuler were passed:
Whereas: It has pleased Divine Providence to remove from our midst, our beloved brother, A. Shuler, and recognizing that by his death our Lodge, and the order at large, has lost one of its most earnest and conscientious workers. Therefore be it
Resolved: That we extend to his family our heart felt sympathy in their bereavement, and further.
Resolved: That the Lodge furniture be draped in mourning for the period of thirty days, and be it further
Resolved: That we extend our thanks to the members of Naomi Lodge No. 55, K. of P. for the kind attention given during the Brothers sickness, and at the funeral, and be it also further
Resolved: That a copy of these resolutions be sent to his family, and a copy of the same sent to each of the county papers.
    Jacob Gee,
    Willis Roush,
    David Lasley.
    Committee.

     At the breaking out of the rebellion, Mr. Shuler at once entered the army as a private soldier, enlisting in Co. H. Fifty third, O.v.I.
     He was one of the 350,000 men that stood up with gun in hand and fought in battle, he took part in all the battles during the Sherman Campaign. He was a brave soldier, a law abiding and patriotic citizen.
The poor man's friend, he did many a chariatable act, although no demonstration was ever made by him.

Gallipolis Journal
January 25, 1893

Death of Alexander Shuler
     Mr. Alexander Shuler, Superintendent of the Gallia County Infirmary, died on Sunday morning last at 8:00 o'clock, after a protracted illness. He was in the 49th year of his age, and a member of the Free-Will Baptist Church. During the war he served with honor in the 53d Ohio Infantry. He was a most excellent citizen, and had many friends. His wife and six children are left to mourn thier irreparable loss. The funeral was held at Cheshire on Tuesday.

[Note: Buried in Gravel Hill Cemetery in Cheshire Township; B. 1844; unit Co. H 53rd OVI]

Gallipolis Bulletin
December 31, 1892
Transcribed by Jan Rader                                                                               Top of Page


Shuler, Bartlett

Death of Mr. Shuler
     Bartlett Shuler, of Addison died Monday, morning after a long illness of paralysis. He was an old soldier and well known farmer a member of the F. W. Baptist church and was also a Knight of Pythias highly esteemed by all who knew him.
     He is survived by his wife and the following children: Mrs. John Spires, Etta, Lettie, Anna, Harrison and Howard Shuler; also by one brother and one sister, Wm. Shuler and Miss Amanda Shuler, the latter living near Vinton. Mrs. Susan Shuler of this city was a sister-in-law.
     The funeral services were held Tuesday by Rev. Thomas under the auspices of the K. of P.

[Note: Buried in Gravel Hill Cemetery in Cheshire Township; B. 1845, D. October 17, 1907, Death Records Vol. 2; Co. M 7th OVC]

Gallipolis Bulletin
October 18, 1907
Vol. XXXX No. 20
Transcribed by Jan Rader


Shuler, Benjamin

Killed, on Sunday, August 16, 1864, in battle near Winchester, Mr. Benj. Schuler.

[Note: Benjamin was the son of Jeremiah and Rosanna McCarty Shuler. He enlisted as a Private in Co. G, 13th West Virginia Infantry and died in a battle near Winchester. He was only 16 years old and is buried at Shuler Cemetery in Cheshire Township. Winchester is in Virginia, but only about 15 or so miles from Charles Town, West Virginia where he was killed. ]

The Gallipolis Journal
September 15, 1864
Transcribed by Eva Swain Hughes


Shuler, William Maurice

Highly Respected Citizen of Cheshire Dead - Burial Sunday
     Wiliam Maurcie, son of Jeremiah and Rosanna McCarty Shuler, was born Jan. 9, 1843. He departed this life June 6, 1911, aged 68 years, 4 months and 27 days.
     He was united in marriage to Elizabeth C. Hawley to which union were born ten children, four sons and six daughters. Two sons and one daughter have crossed the river. The wife and seven children, Mrs. Nannie Rowley, Mrs. Mollie Hardway, William J. and Jerry of Guy, New Mexico, Mrs. Julia Berry and Miss Rose of Cheshire and Miss Florence at home survive him.
     In his home life he was a tender, devoted husband and father. He leaves a family of well educated christian children. The mother, seven children, four grand-children, four sisters, Mrs. G. M. Vance and Mrs. Frank Swisher of Cheshire, Mrs. J. H. Askren of Davenport, Iowa, and Mrs. Samuel Fulton of Brunswick, Ohio, and numerous other relatives and friends are left to mourn a sad loss, but they mourn not as they that have no hope for the greatest consolation is theirs. He lived for Christ. He was faithful to the end, there is laid up for him a crown of life.
     At the age of twenty-one he joined the Ohio National Guard, was a private in Capt. Amos Mauck's Co. A. 16th regiment and served until honorably discharged. Afterward he joined the 141st O.V.I. Later in life at the age of forty he joined that other army; the great army of the Lord with Jesus as captain and was an ardent valiant soldier of the cross. He loved the cause of Christ and was faithful in attendance at the services in the house of God. He united with the Kyger Second Freewill Baptist church and was faithful to his church until called home. His last Sabbath on earth was spent at the house of God. It seems that he knew "the time of departure was near at hand" for he spoke impressively to the young people urging them to live for God and told them that would be his last Sabbath with them.

Thy will be done! I will not fear
   The fate provided by thy love;
Though clouds and darkness shroud me here,
   I know that all is bright above.

Father, forgive the heart that clings,
   Thus trembling to the things of time,
And bid my soul, on angels wings,
   Ascend into a purer clime.

There shall no doubts disturb its trust,
   No sorrows dim celestial love;
But these afflictions of the dust,
   Like shadows of the night, remove.

     The funeral services were held at his late home last Sunday afternoon conducted by Rev. George Sprouse. Burial at the home cemetery by Undertaker DeMane under the auspices of the K. of P. lodge of which he was an honored member. One son, Jerry, came from Guy, N. Mexico and was present at the burial.

Cards of Thanks
     We wish to thank the kind friends, the K. of  P. lodge members, the minister, the choir, who spoke words of comfort and rendered valued assistance to us at the time of the death of our beloved husband and father.


[Note: Buried Gravel hill Cemetery, Cheshire - MS note: Jan 9, 1843 - June 6, 1911; Stone reads Unit Co A 16th OVI TD COD 141st OVI]

Gallipolis Journal
Wed June 14, 1911
Transcribed by Maxine Marshall 

An almost identical obituary ran in the June 7, 1911 Gallipolis Journal
and was submitted and transcribed by Sandy Bledsoe                                       Top of Page


Sibley, Adam E.

     Adam E. Sibley, son of Wm. and Lydia Sibley, was born in Gallia Co. Ohio, Aug 29 1843, and died in Silverdale, Wash., May 1 1912.
     In 1862 he enlisted in the 7th Ohio Volunteer Cavalry, was in Belle Isle, Andersonville, and Charleston prisons 13 months and 7 days.
     He was married to Mary Eva Chambers Mar. 30, 1871. Of this union seven children were born, all of whom are living—Wm. C. of Eureka, Ohio, Mrs. Gussie Patterson at Angola, Ohio, Robert D. at Fresno, Calif., Carl, Bert, Lawrence and Lynn at Silverdale Wash. He is also survived by one brother, J.R Sibley of Gallipolis, Ohio. The deceased was never connected with any church, but always lived a clean, upright life and was liked and respected by all who knew him. He was a member of the Knights of Golden Eagle of Glenwood, W. Va. and the G.A.R. of Oakland Calif.
     He was sick only a short time, death resulted from heart failure. He was buried from Lewis’s Undertaking Parlors, Bremerton, Wash. May 5 1912. Rev. G. Anderson of Silverdale M. E. Church conducted the services. Miss Grace H. Anderson sang “Face to face with Christ my Savior” and “Flee as a Bird to the Mountain.” The remains were taken to Seattle and buried in Lake View Cemetery.

From an undated scrapbook clipping.
Mary James


Sibley, Hiram Flavius

Death of H.F. Sibley
     Hiram Flavius Sibley, a former Meigs County man, died at Vincennes, Indiana, March 24. He was born at Kyger, Oct. 17, 1846. In 1870 he was married to Miss Corrella Woods at Racine and they were the parents of five children. Mrs. Sibley died in August, 1918. She was a sister of the late Mark Woods, and of the two wifes of the late Judge J.P. Bradbury. Mr. Sibley was a Civil War veteran. His remains were taken to his old home at Fairfield, Illinois, for burial.

[Note: He served in Co. C, 136th Illinois Regiment and Co. A, 52nd Illinois Regiment.]

Gallia Times
April 13, 1922
Transcribed by Henny Evans


Siders, Henry

Obituary
     Siders. - Henry Siders was born in Virginia and moved to Ohio, where he remained the rest of his life. He served as a soldier in the late war. He died May 21st, aged fifty-four years. He joined the F. W. B. Church some three years ago, and lived faithful until death. His funeral services were conducted by his pastor Rev. E. N. Longe, and his remains were laid to rest in the Salem Cemetery, in Perry Tp., Gallia Co., Ohio, burial by Undertaker Wetherholt. He leaves a wife and four children to mourn their loss.

Blessed are the dead which die in the Lord, from henceforth yea,
saith the Spirit, that they may rest from their labors and their works do follow them.
I am forty-four and am alone - another year is gone-
I've fought the fight, I've kept the faith, the victory is almost won.
Henceforth there is laid up for me a crown in heaven above;
Not only me, but everyone that does the Saviour love.
Should I be spared another year, my daily prayer shall be
That I may keep what common sense the Lord has given me.
Minnie, Mattie, Bert and Lillie, my children, they are very kind indeed; they ought to be;
When they were young I card for them - now they must care for me.
And now dear children, when you see these lines which were composed by me,
Think of mother when she is gone - sleeping in the silent tomb.
I need to read God's Holy Word with pleasure and delight,
But now I sit and study from morning until night.
I once was young, but now I am old, my body is weak and frail,
I'm waiting patiently each day to enter in the vale.
Twenty years ago, it was then that I was wed;
The man that clasped my hand in his is silent with the dead.
I'm sitting here alone to-day, thinking o'er the past;
Twenty years we lived together, but parting came at last.
And now my days and nights seem long, since I am left alone;
I soon shall meet him in that land where parting is unknown.
                                                                                                               Casander Siders.

[Note: From Cogar research, served in Co. G 1st OVHA]

Gallipolis Bulletin
September 3, 1892
Transcribed by Jan Rader                                                                               Top of Page


Siders, Noah

Noah Siders Dies After Long Seige
     Noah Siders, aged 78, an old settler of Benton, died at his home 4-1/2 miles northeast of that city at 2 o'clock Sunday afternoon following an illness of several months. Old age and chronic Bright's disease were the causes of his demise. Funeral services will be held from the Siders home Tuesday afternoon at 2
o'clock, conducted by Reverend S.E. Hendrickson, pastor of the Christian church. Interment will follow in the Benton cemetery.
     Noah Siders was one of the very oldest and most respected citizens of the Benton community. He was one of the progressive farmers up until a few years ago when his health and the afflictions incident to his years made it imperative to give up active work, when he turned over the keeping of his farms to his sons. He was a member of the Christian church and was an old soldier.
     Seven children and his second wife survive him; George Siders, Marion Siders, Sarah Siders, are at home with the family. Ephriam Siders, of Burr Oak, Kan.; Welsey Siders, Union Furnace, Ohio; Mrs. Mary Hardie, Marcellus, N.Y. Three children are dead. Many El Doradoans, friends of the Siders family, are planning to attend the services.

[Note: He lived in Gallia County as a young man and served in Co. M,, 7th Ohio Volunteer Cavalry. February 25, 1837-August 15, 1915.]

El Dorado Daily Republic (Kansas)
August 16, 1915
Transcribed by Henny Evans


Simmerman, Henry C.

Death of Henry C. Simmerman
     We failed to give fuller notice of the death of Mr. Henry C. Simmerman because of lack of information.
Mr. Simmerman was born January 26th, 1840, at Patriot, O. He was a wagon maker, merchant and farmer, moving to town about 15 years ago.
     He served in Sherman's army for four years and was with him on his march to the sea. He was a splendid citizen, scrupulously honest and honorable in all his business affairs, his cheerful and happy demeanor making many friends of casual acquaintances.
     Mr. Simmerman left Miss Anna, a teacher in our public schools, Ernest who farms near Columbus, O., Fred, who resides in California and the widow.
     Brief services were held Monday morning at the residence on Second Avenue, with extended services at Patriot, where the remains were interred. Rev. C.B. Smith conducted the services, Wetherholt & Entsminger acting as funeral directors.

Gallipolis Daily Tribune
January 21, 1924
Transcribed by Henny Evans


Simmons, Phillip

Phillip Simmons Dead
Resided in East Gallipolis and Was Civil War Veteran
     Mr. Phillip Simmons, well known resident and Civil War veteran of Gallia county, passed away at his home in East Gallipolis Saturday afternoon at 4 o'clock, after an illness for the past two years of senility, bearing his pains with patience and courage.
     He was born in New York state and came to Wood county when young where he became a prosperous merchant, also interested in the oil business. He located in this city about six years ago and has been unable to be in any active business on account of his failing health.
     Four children survive him, his wife having preceded him several years ago. The children are Mrs. Lottie Abbot(t) with whom he resided, Miss Cora, compositor at this office, William living in Pennsylvania, and Miller of Columbus.
     He was a man of most excellent character with a large circle of friends, a veteran of the Civil war and a loving father and husband.
     The funeral services will be conducted from his late residence at 7 o'clock Tuesday evening by Rev. A.J. Wilder. The remains are to be conveyed to Willow Island, W.Va., under direction of Hayward to be interred by the side of his wife.

[Note: Served in Co. H, 1st OVHA]

Gallipolis Daily Tribune
July 17, 1916
Transcribed by Henny Evans


Simmons, Sanford. D.

S.D. Simmons Civil War Veteran Dies
     Sanford Dwight Simmons, a veteran of the Civil war, died Thursday, May 7, at Dayton at the age of 86. Mr. Simmons was well known here having made his home with nieces, Mrs. Lottie Abbott and Miss Cora Simmons for about two years. Funeral arrangement had not been completed.

[Note: He served in 150th Regiment, Ohio Infantry (National Guard).]

Gallipolis Daily Tribune
May 8, 1931
Transcribed by Henny Evans                                                                           Top of Page


Sims, David R.

Death of David R. Sims
     David R. Sims, aged 69 years, died at his home in Crown City Wednesday morning April 22, 1908 at 2 o'clock. Bright's Disease was the cause of his death. He was a highly respected citizen, honest and upright in all his dealings and his death will be deeply deplored.
     He was a soldier of the civil war, serving in the 97th Ohio, and rendered valiant service throughout the war.
     His funeral was preached at Crown city Wednesday evening by Rev. J. E. Dibert. Rev. J. W. Greer then followed with an appropriate talk touching on the deceased's qualities as a man and citizen, and paying a high tribute to him as a soldier.
     The flag which he loved so well followed him to his last resting place on the hill near his old home. May he rest in peace.

[Note: Unit Co. C 97th OVI]

Gallipolis Bulletin
April 24, 1908
Vol. XLI No. 21
Transcribed by Jan Rader


Sims, John

     John Sims, son of Thomas and Barbara Davies Sims, was born near Centerpoint, Ohio, May 1, 1842, and died at the home of his daughter, Mrs. Laura Cherrington, near Camba,O. June 22, 1925, aged 83 years, 1 month and 21 days. Early in his life he united with the Fairview U.B. Church at this place, remaining a
faithful member until his death. He was always ready to contribute to the support and welfare of the church and served as Sunday School Superintendent at different times. He was also the teacher of the young men's class for about 35 years, or until his health failed so he cound not attned.
     During the Civil War when his country called for volunteers, he enlisted in Co. H, 1st Ohio Heavy Artillery, serving until the close of the war. He then returned to his home.
     In April 1871, he was united in marriage with Elizabeth Shelton, who preceded him to the better land about 52 years ago. To this union was born one daughter, Mrs. Laura Cherrington, who survives him and has been much help [and] comfort during his declining years. In 1876 he was married to Mattie Hedges, to this union was born two children, Harry of Youngstown, and Mayme, who preceded her father to the great beyond about 25 years ago.
     After the death of his wife in 1922 he made his home with his daughter at Camba, and brother Evan at Centerpoint, requesting that he be buried from his brother's home and from Fairview Church, where his old neighbors and friends attend. Beside his children he leaves two brothers and two sisters: Thomas of St Cloud, Fla., Evan of this place, Mrs. Anna McNeal of Dallas, Wis., and Sarah Oliver of Salem, Ore. These with ten grandchldren and four great-grandchildren.
     He will long be remembered as a student, intensive reader and for his great interest in
education. He had a splendid civic spirit. In affairs pertaining to relief of worthy distressed it can
truthfully be said that he was foremost. These qualities make for long and pleasant remembrance.

[Note: He is buried in Fairview Cemetery, Oak Hill, Jackson County, Ohio.]

Oak Hill Press
July 23, 1925
Transcribed by Henny Evans


Sisson, Benjamin W.

     Benjamin Sisson was born July 20, 1847 in Springfield Township. He enlisted in Co.I, 173rd Ohio Volunteer Infantry. He had severe knee problems which developed during his service and used crutches from then on.
     He married Mary Rowley in 1870 and they had seven children. He was a postmaster in 1880 and then obtained a position as a government clerk in the Pension Office in Washington DC. He died there March 8, 1928 and is buried in Glenwood Cemetery, Sission Family Plot, in Washington DC.

Created obit from Nancy Hank Ewing research and soldier records
March 8, 1928
Created by Henny Evans


Sisson, Dr. Nelson B.

Death of Dr. Sisson
     Dr. Nelson B. Sisson, one of the best known citizens of the county, died at his home at Porter Wednesday morning, January 28, 1903. He was a native of Gallia County having been born in this city July 17, 1820, and had lived here all his life.
     He studied medicine and in March, 1846, graduated at the University of Louisville, Ky., at that time the leading institution of its kind west of the Allegheny mountains. He settled in this county and practiced his profession until 1870, when ill-health compelled him to retire.
     Dr. Sisson served throughout the civil war as assistant surgeon of the 92d Vol. Infantry. In 1880 he was an elector on the Republican ticket, casting his vote for James A. Garfield for President.
     Dr. Sisson was successful in the practice of his profession, a public-spirited man and enjoyed the respect and esteem of his neighbors in a marked degree.
     He was married three times and leaves several children, among whom are Mrs. Dr. C. G. Parker of this city and Grace, Elias and Stephen of Porter. His wife, formerly Miss Carrie Wetherholt, also survives him. The funeral services will be held this morning at the Methodist Church at Porter, of which he was a member, by Rev. John W. McCormick and Rev. E. E. Stone, interment following at Long cemetery by Wetherholt.

Gallipolis Bulletin January 30, 1903
Transcribed by Jan Rader                                                                               Top of Page


Sisson, Warren

     Letter from Capt. of Co. E, 11th Regiment, Illinois Volunteers after the battle of Fort Donelson, Tennessee, only 116 were left uninjured of the entire regiment. Among the killed was a Gallia county boy, Warren Sisson of Kygerville, son of the late Sheriff Sisson.

Found in a scrapbook article, Reminiscences of 1862.
Gallipolis Dispatch
March, 1862
Transcribed by Henny Evans


Sisson, William H.H.

W.H.H. Sisson
     In 1870 William H. Sisson, at the age of 30, was living in a boarding house in Gallipolis. His occupation was Treasurer of Gallia County. His tombstone gives his date of death as December 24, 1876. The newspapers at this time are missing but in the January 3, 1877 Gallipolis Bulletin it stated, "The County Commissioners met in special session last Saturday for the purpose of appointing a Clerk of the Courts to fill the vacancy occassioned by the death of W.H.H. Sisson."

[Note: He is buried in Pine Street Cemetery and he served in Co. B, 4th Ohio Volunteer Infantry.]

Gallipolis Bulletin
January 3, 1877
Reported by Henny Evans 


Skinner, Henry Clay

Henry Skinner Dead
     Henry Clay Skinner, 79, a well known resident of this county, died at Oak Hill on April 27, 1921. The funeral was held Saturday at Old Pine Church by Rev. W.J. Fulton of Rio Grande and Revs. Thompson and Davis of Oak Hill, the burial being under Masonic direction.
     On Christmas day, 1865, Mr. Skinner was united in marriage with Emily G. Davis. To them were born five children, Charles of Towanda, Ill., Aaron W. of Oak Hill, Mrs. Charles Wigner of Gallipolis, Mrs. Edward White of Everett, Wash., and Mrs. Ella Jones, who died in 1909. Left a widower in 1883, Mr. Skinner was married in 1886 to Mary Hanna, who died in 1888.
     Mr. Skinner was a splendid citizen, a devout churchman, and in every way commanded the respect of his fellow citizens.

[Note: He served as a Squirrel Hunter and he is buried in Old Pine Cemetery, 1841-1921.]

Gallia Times
April 28, 1921
Transcribed by Henny Evans                                                                           Top of Page


Slagle, John

     John Slagle was born in Virginia Feb. 3, 1829, and died June 15, 1914, aged 85 years, 4 months and 12 days. He came to Ohio when three years old and lived here all the remainder of his life.
In 1850 he was united in marriage to Nancy Wood. To them were born seven children, five of whom survive him, George of Nonchalanta, Kans., Charles, John and Noah of Gallia, and Mrs. Charles Carter of Patriot.
A son, William, preceded him to the Great Beyond last Thanksgiving, and Mrs. W.S. Boggs about twenty years ago. The aged wife and mother yet survives.
     Mr. Slagle was honest and upright in all his dealings, and by his jovial disposition made many
friends. When the civil war broke out he enlisted in the 91st Ohio and served throughout the war. His record as a soldier was not to be despised. Many were the brave deeds he did, and when privations and hardships came he bore them uncomplainingly. But he has fought his last fight, he has finished his course, he has kept the faith. Henceforth there is laid up for him a crown of righteousness. He expressed himself as being ready for the call of the Master.
     He was laid to rest in Salem cemetery. The funeral services were conducted, by Rev. R.R. Denney, assisted by Rev. Brewer.

Gallia Times
July 1, 1914
Transcribed by Henny Evans


Small, William Penn

An Old Veteran
Has Answered the Last Great Roll Call
     William Penn Small died at his home on Second Avenue early Friday morning, following a sudden attack of asthma and heart trouble. He had been on the streets of the city all the evening previous and of course the death came as a great shock to everyone with whom he was acquainted.
     Capt. W. P. Small was born at Pittsburg, Oct. 26, 1846, being the son of Mr. and Mrs. Richard Small. At the age of fifteen he entered the army enlisting as a private in the 36th Ohio Infantry Regiment and there served until the close of the war, when he located at Bladensburg in this county. He then took up the work of pilot on the steamer Fleetwood, but owing to a severe wound sustained while in the army he was forced to quit that vocation, when he left for California to work in the quartz mills. However, he returned to Gallia later and was married to Miss Mary Brown and to them were born three sons, Chauncey, Charlie and Corie, and one daughter, Myrtie. He served as Sheriff of Gallia County and conducted a large furniture store, which was burned in 1893.
     His poor health did not permit him to engage in business further so he retired, drawing a large pension.
Mr. Small was a member of the G.A.R. and a very prominent Mason. His funeral services were conducted last Sunday afternoon by Rev. Mr. Miller at Grace M. E. Church at 3 p.m. The Masons used their beautiful burial ritual at both the church and cemetery, after which a squad of company C fired a salute over the grave of the dead veteran who had fought so bravely for his country. He is survived by a wife, two sons, brothers Scott, John E. of Chicago, and C. R. of this city, and sisters Mrs. Parmley, Mrs. Mary Sims and Mrs. Elizabeth Johnson of Canton.

[Buried Pine Street Cemetery - Tombstone reads 10-26-1846 - 6-28-1904 D.R. Co I, 36th OVI, Co G, 16th URC]

Gallipolis Bulletin
July 1, 1904
Transcribed by Maxine Marshall


Smeltzer, Darius M.

Death Comes To Darius M. Smeltzer, an Old Soldier
Burial Today.
     Darius M. Smeltzer, a well-known old soldier, died at the home of his son-in-law and daughter, Mr. and Mrs. Lewis E. Grube, at 9:30 Monday night of hardening of the arteries. While his health had not been good for a long time, his condition became critical only a few days before his death. On Friday a paralytic stroke made his conditon virtually hopeless, rendering him speechless but not unconscious.
     Mr. Smeltzer was born and reared in Green Tp. He was a son of Jacob Smeltzer and was 72 years old on June 21, 1915. He married Mary Brainerd, who died Aug. 11, 1902. To them were born six children, of whom five survive him - Mrs. Edgar Henshaw and Mrs. Will Harrison of Green township, Mrs. Lewis Grube and Frank H. of Gallipolis, and Mrs. Jerome Wood of Everett, Wash. One daughter, Mrs. Fred James died 10 or 11 years ago. One brother, Lewis, and a sister, Mrs. John Swigert, reside in Gallipolis; and a brother, H. C., lives in Dighton, Kans.
     He belonged to Co. F, 141st O. V. I., the same company of which E. L. Henshaw was a member.
Mr. Smeltzer was a jolly, pleasant man and had a host of friends here and in the country. He has long been a familiar figure on our streets and had always had a smile and a pleasant word for every acquaintance. He will be missed.
     The funeral services will be conducted by Rev. J. W. McCormick at the Grube home at 1:30 o'clock this Thursday afternoon. Burial at Mound Hill by Wetherholt under the auspices of the G. A. R. Post. A telegram was received from Mrs. Jerome Wood stating that she was ill and could not be here for the funeral.

[Note: Has a stone, stone note B. June 21, 1843, D. November 15, 1915; unit Co. F 141st OVI]

Gallipolis Journal
November 18, 1915
Vol. 97 No. 46

D. M. Smeltzer Dead
     Darius M. Smeltzer, a former resident of Green Township, passed away at his home here Monday night after a long illness from hardening of the arteries, aged 73 years.
     The funeral will be held this (Thursday) afternoon from the Lewis Grube residence, interment following in Mound Hill Cemetery by undertaker Wetherholt.
     Mr. Smeltzer was a good citizen and was a veteran of the Civil War. He is survived by the following children: Mrs. Edgar Henshaw, and Mrs. Will Harrison of Green Township, Mrs. Lewis Grube and Frank Smeltzer of Gallipolis, and Mrs. Jerome Wood of Everett, Washington. A sister, Mrs. John Swigert lives in Gallipolis and a brother H. C., in Kansas.

Gallipolis Bulletin
November 18, 1915
No. 46 p. 11
Transcribed by Jan Rader 

Smeltzer, Darius M.

D. M. Smeltzer Dead
     Darius M. Smeltzer, 73, who has lived in town several years, and before that was a well known farmer of Green township, died Monday night at 9:15 after a week's illness. He had been suffering with hardening of the arteries.
     Mr. Smeltzer lost his wife fourteen years ago, and five children survive him--Mrs. Edgar Henshaw and Mrs. Will Harrison of Green township, Mrs. Lewis Grube and Frank H. of Gallipolis, and Mrs. Jerome Wood of Everett, Wash. One brother, Lewis, and a sister, Mrs. John Swigert, reside in Gallipolis; and a brother, H.C., lives in Dighton, Kans.
     The funeral will probably be Thursday afternoon, from Lewis Grube's residence, with interment at Mound Hill by Wetherholt. Mr. Smeltzer served in the Union Army during the War.

The Gallipolis Tribune
Friday, November 19, 1915, p. 1
Contributed by Maj. J. M. Smeltzer      
                                                           Top of Page


Smeltzer, John

Death of Mr. Smeltzer
     Mr. John Smeltzer, Justice of the Peace, living in Green township, about nine miles from town in the Hulbert settlement, died this morning soon after midnight September 23, 1907. Mr. Smeltzer had been in failing health from heart trouble for a year or more. For the last six weeks he has not been able to lie down and his entire body was in a dropsical condition.
     He left a wife, two sons Edward and Wilson and one daughter, Mrs. Frank Carter of Columbus. He is survived by one sister, Mrs. John Swigert and four brothers Lewis, D.M., Peter and Henry, the last living in Iowa. He was 77 years old and a very fine man highly respected.
     The funeral services will be conducted by Rev. John W. McCormick at Centenary, Wednesday at 10 a.m., Hayward & Son, Undertakers.

[Note: He served in Co. H, 41st Ohio Volunteer Infantry.]

Gallipolis Daily Tribune
September 23, 1907
Transcribed by Henny Evans


Smeltzer, Joseph

SMELTZER
     Mr. Joseph Smeltzer, whose serious illness has been noted, died at 12 o'clock Wednesday, August 26, 1896, at his home in Green township, of inflammation of the bowels, and aged about 62 years. There will be short religious services at his home between 9 and 10 o'clock Friday morning, when the funeral cortege will go over to Centenary, where Rev. J. W. Dillon and Undertaker Wetherholt will officiate.
     He was born and reared in Green township and was a brother of John, Lewis, Peter and D. M. Smeltzer of this county, and Henry of Kansas; also of the late Mrs. Will Scott, of Lafayette, Ind., Mrs. Dan M. Wigner, Mrs. J. W. Womeldorff and Mrs. John Swigert.
     He was a miller on Raccoon Creek, a widely known and a good straightforward citizen highly esteemed by all who knew him. He was a soldier in the hundred days service and received a pension for disabilities received as such. He leaves an estimable family consisting of widow and son Charley of New London, O., and sons Jacob, Bert and Ross, of this county; also (their) sisters, Mrs. Lizzie Rader and Mrs. Annie Shelton, of Cadmus.

The Gallipolis Tribune
Friday August 28 1896, p. 1
Contributed by Maj. J. M. Smeltzer            

Death of Joseph Smeltzer
     At 11 o'clock Wednesday forenoon, August 26, 1896, after a distressing illness from stomach trouble, Mr. Joseph Smeltzer, one of Gallia county's most prominent and esteemed citizens, passed away at his home in Green township. Mr. Smeltzer was a soldier in the war of the rebellion and received a gunshot wound in his side that has caused him much trouble at intervals ever since, and it is generally supposed that the malady that terminated his life was from that cause. The funeral services were conducted Friday forenoon at 11 o'clock at Centennary church by Rev. J. W. Dillon, pastor of the M. E. church of this city, burial following at the cemetery at that place by Wetherholt.
     Deceased was the third son of a family of ten, all of whom survive him except one sister, Mrs. Wm. Scott, who died some years ago at her home in Indiana. Those living are John, Louis, Peter and D. M., Mrs. D. M. Wigner, Mrs. James Womeldorff and Mrs. John Swigert, of this county, and Henry, of Dighton, Kansas.    
     Deceased was 62 years of age, and no one enjoyed more fully the universal esteem and confidence of a wide circle of acquaintances than he. Of him it can touchfully be said that a good man has gone from among us. Besides the brothers and sisters named, he leaves a widow, five sons and two daughters, viz., Jacob, J. A., Bert, Mrs. Lizzie Rader and Mrs. Anna Shelton who have the assurance that their brother, husband and father has gone to a better life.

[Note: Has a stone; B. June 8, 1834; unit Co. F, 141st OVI]

Gallipolis Journal
September 1, 1896
Transcribed by Jan Rader                                                                               Top of Page


Smeltzer, Lewis

Death of Lewis Smeltzer
     Lewis Smeltzer, one of our pioneer citizens, passed away Wednesday morning at the home of his daughter, Mrs. William H. Belcher. He was 82 years old and his death was caused by heart trouble.
The funeral services will be conducted Friday afternoon by Rev. J. Otto Newton, burial being in the Mound Hill Cemetery by undertaker Hayward.
     He is survived by one brother, Henry Smeltzer of Dighton, Kansas, a sister, Mrs. Jean Swigert of Gallipolis and the following children: James H. Smeltzer, Peter Smeltzer and Mrs. Rosa Belcher of Gallipolis and Amos F. Smeltzer of Pittsburg. A daughter, Mrs. Pauley, died about two years ago.
     Mr. Smeltzer was born in Green Township and was a stone-mason by trade and followed that occupation until failing health forced him to retire a few years ago. He was a life-long Republican and was one of the original "Squirrel Hunters" organized for home defense during the Civil War.
     He was a kindly, hard-working man and leaves a host of friends to mourn his departure.

Gallipolis Bulletin
March 23, 1916


Lewis Smeltzer
Passed Away Wednesday, Aged 82 -- Funeral Tomorrow.
     Lewis Smeltzer, popularly called Uncle Lew, on Wednesday morning of heart trouble at the home of his daughter, Mrs. W. H. Belcher. He was 82 years old.
     He is survived by one brother, Henry Smeltzer of Dighton, Kansas, a sister, Mrs. John swigert of Gallipolis and the following children: James H. Smeltzer, Peter Smeltzer and Mrs. Rosa Belcher of Gallipolis and Amos F. Smeltzer of Pittsburg. A daughter, Mrs. Arthur Pauley, died about two years ago. The late D. H. Smeltzer was a brother.
     Mr. Smeltzer was born in Green township and was a stone-mason by trade and followed that occupation until failing health forced him to retire a few years ago. He was a life-long Republican and was one of the original "Squirrel Hunters" organized for home defense during the Civil War.
He was a modest, kind-hearted old man, who had a smile and a pleasant word for every acquaintance, and his pleasant ways made him a host of friends.
     The funeral services will be conducted by Rev. J. O. Newton at 2 o'clock tomorrow. Burial at Mound Hill by Hayward.

[Note: dates from death record, b. April 24, 1833, d. March 22, 1916]

Gallipolis Journal
Thursday, March 23, 1916
Transcribed by Jan Rader
Smeltzer, Lewis

Lewis Smeltzer Dead
An Aged and Well Known Stone Mason Passes
     Lewis Smeltzer, one of our aged residents passed away at 7:30 o'clock Wednesday morning, March 22, 1916, after a short illness with pneumonia at the home of his daughter, Mrs. William H. Belcher, on lower First avenue. He had been in failing health for several weeks but was not alarmingly ill, before Saturday morning and gradually grew weaker until the end.
     He was born April 24, 1833 in Green township where he resided until his wife died about 28 years ago. He was the son of Mr. and Mrs. Jacob Smeltzer and was a man of the best qualities a friend to all, kind and generous to his family, industrious and was well known throughout Gallia county, doing considerable work as a stonemason, his occupation before he became too old to follow it.
     In 1852 [sic] he was united in marriage to Miss Maria Ripley to which union six children were born: Mrs. W. H. Belcher, Miss Mary Smeltzer and Mrs. A. J. Pauley, deceased, James H., at the O.H.E., Amos, of Pittsburgh and Peter of this city.
     He has made his home with Chief of Police and Mrs. Belcher since Mrs. Pauley's death two years ago. One sister Mrs. John Swigert here and one brother Henry of Deighton, Kansas, survive him.
The funeral services will be conducted at 2 p.m. Friday at his late home by Rev. J. O. Newton, interment to follow at Mound Hill under direction of Hayward.

The Gallipolis Tribune,
24 March 1916, p. 1
Contributed by Maj. J. M. Smeltzer                                                                   Top of Page


Smeltzer, Peter

SUDDEN DEATH Of Peter Smeltzer
Well Known Gallia Farmer
     Mr. Peter Smeltzer, 71 years old, a prominent farmer of Green township, fell dead from his horse about 5:30 Monday afternoon, May 11, 1908, in the pasture lot near his home, six miles out the Portsmouth road. Mr. Smeltzer was well known in Gallipolis and the news was pretty well known all over Gallipolis in an hour after it happened and was quite a shock, for he had been in town that morning, bringing his son Harry in to his school, a young man 19 years old, and having his buggy repaired. He returned home about the middle of the forenoon and was in his usual health and wanted his wife to return to town with him and attend the circus, but she didn't care to come so he remained at home, but was not engaged in any particular work until he went after the cows, after he had eaten his supper. He had some trouble with the cows, and his wife was just going to his assistance when she and a young man named Slagle saw him fall from his horse. They ran to his side, but he never spoke, only gasped once or twice and was dead. Mr. Will Helrich came along with an express and assisted in getting the body into it, when it was taken to his home. Dr. Claude Parker, the Coroner was called out and viewed the remains and found his neck to have been broken by the fall. The fall was probably due to an attack of heart trouble, as he had had sinking spells before.
     His funeral services will be at Centenary at 2 o'clock, by suntime, Wednesday afternoon, conducted by Rev. Charles Pfaltzgraff and Rev. J. W. McCormick, the interment being also in Centenary graveyard conducted by Undertaker Wetherholt.
     Mr. Smeltzer was married twice. His first wife was Miss Sidney Waddell. By her he left four children surviving, Mrs. John Long, George E. Smeltzer, County Commissioner W. N. Smeltzer, and T. E. Smeltzer. By his second wife Miss Echelmyer, he left one son Harry. He is also survived by brothers Lewis and D. M. Smeltzer of this city, and Harry of Dighton, Kansas, and one sister, Mrs. John Swigert living near town.
     Mr. Smeltzer was a very popular well liked man, and while he had reached the alloted span of life, accorded to the human race, and somewhat beyond, his death will be lamented by a host of friends and relatives.

The Gallipolis Tribune
Friday, 15 May 1908, p. 1
Contributed by Maj. J. M. Smeltzer


Smeltzer, Peter

Suddenly
Death Comes To Well Known Farmer
     Mr. Peter Smeltzer, a well known farmer of Green township fell from his horse in the pasture lot near his home Monday afternoon and broke his neck. He had been to town that morning, bringing his son Harry to his school, and having his buggy repaired. He returned home in the afternoon and that evening went after the cows, when his wife saw him fall from his horse. She ran to him but he never spoke, only gasping once or twice and then was gone. Mr. Will Helrick took the body home in his express and Coroner Claude Parker was summoned and found his neck broken by the fall.
     Mr. Smeltzer was twice married. His first wife was Miss Sidney Waddell. By her he left four children surviving, Mrs. John Long, George E. Smeltzer, County Commissioner W. N. Smeltzer, and T. E. Smeltzer. By his seocnd wife Miss Echelmyer, he left one son Harry. He is also survived by brothers Lewis and D. M. Smeltzer of this city, and Harry of Dighton, Kansas, and one sister, Mrs. John Swigert living near town.
     He was a whole-souled gentleman, widely known and popular with everyone and his death will be regretted by a legion of friends.
     The funeral services were held Wednesday afternoon at Centenary by Rev.J. W. McCormick and Rev. Pfaltzgraff, interment following same place by Wetherholt.

[Note: Tombstone reads 1837-1908. Served in Co. F, 141st O.V.I.]

Gallipolis Bulletin
May 15, 1908
Transcribed by Maxine Marshall                                                                        Top of Page


Smeltzer, Reuben

Former Resident Dead

     Gallia County relatives have received announcement of the death of Reuben Smeltzer, which occurred at his home at Sidney, Ohio, recently. Mr. Smeltzer was born in Gallia County in August, 1844, on what was formerly the Elijah Stone farm now owned by Charles Graham,in Green township. His parents were Adam and Margaret Smeltzer, long since dead.
     Mr. Smeltzer ran away from home at the age of 18 and enlisted in the Union army, Company K, 20th O.V.I., and served three years. He was twice wounded, captured and escaped and was with Gen. Sherman on his famous march to the sea.
     Mr. Smeltzer is survived by his wife and a married daughter, and hosts of relatives, many of whom reside in Gallia County. He was a cousin of Messrs. D.M. and Lewis Smeltzer of this city.

[Note: His death certificate states he was born August 29, 1844 and died January 24, 1914. He is buried in Graceland Cemetery. He married the daughter of W.J. Lucas in 1871 in Sidney, Ohio]

Gallia Times
April 8, 1914
Transcribed by Henny Evans


Smith, David

Aged Citizen Gone
     David Smith, of Vinton, died Monday, July 19, 1909, after a long illness, aged about 75 years. His wife is very sick and it is feared she cannot survive. Mr. Smith's brother, of Pennsylvania, was with him in his last hours and Mrs. Smith's brother, of Kansas, is now with her. The funeral was held Wednesday, and burial at Mt. Tabor.

[Note: from Cogar research, served in Co. C, 194th OVI]

Gallipolis Bulletin
July 23, 1909
Transcribed by Jan Rader                                                                               Top of Page


Smith, Edward M.

Death Takes Away Another Veteran
Edward M. Smith Dies While Visiting His Daughter at Osage, Minn. Falls Victim to Pneumonia
     Veteran of Civil War and Commander of G.A.R. Post was buried Monday. Edward M. Smith, one of the pioneers of Redwood county died at nine o'clock Thursday evening. About three weeks ago Mr. Smith went to visit his daughter living at Osage, Minn. There a severe cold ended in pneumonia which caused his death.
     The body was brought back to Redwood Falls for burial arriving Saturday. The funeral was held from the Christian church Monday afternoon, under the auspices of the G.A.R. Post. Rev. Ainsworth of the Christian church officiated, and the funeral was in charge of O. W. Grapp. Mr. Smith was the commander of the local G.A.R. Post and the Post attended the funeral in a body. Veterans Fedderly, Coslon, Bell, Beer, Keeney, Ferris and Baker served as pall bearers. The ladies of the Relief Corps also attended. Interment was made in the Redwood cemetery.
     Edward Smith was born in Gallia county, Ohio, in 1844 and lived there until 1861. Then he enlisted in the 36th Ohio regiment with which he served until the close of the war. In 1866 he came to Minnesota, living in Steele county until '76 at which time he moved to Redwood county where he resided until his death. The last few years were spent on the farm of his son, A.M. Smith, in Paxton township.
     Mr. Smith was married to Miss Laura Morrison of Owatonna in 1871. Mrs. Smith died in August, 1890. Four children were born to Mr. and Mrs. Smith all of whom are living. They are: E. R. Smith of Park Rapids, Mrs. Sylvia Sartain of Osage, Mrs. Francis E. Manuel of Columbus, Wis., and Arthur M. Smith of Redwood Falls.
     During the past year Mr. Smith has been commander of the G.A.R. Post. He will be greatly
missed by the veterans of the Post and the Relief Corps as well as by his numerous friends and
relatives.
     The Relief Corps and ladies of the Cemetery association expressed their appreciation of
Mr. Smith's loyalty in the past, by beautiful floral tributes.

Redwood Falls, MN paper
January 24, 1913
Transcribed by Henny Evans


Smith, Isaac

     Isaac Smith was born in Salisbury township, Meigs county, Ohio, Sept. 10, 1830, and died at his home in Cheshire township, Gallia county, June 10, 1914, aged 83 years and 9 months.
     Mr. Smith was united in marriage to Miss Lucinda Hysell on April 15, 1854. To them eight children were born, three of whom preceded their father in death, Eva, Rosa and James. He is survived by his aged wife and five sons and daughters, Mrs. Margaret Lloyd of Raymond City, W.Va., Isaac of Poplar Ridge, Alonzo of Wellston and Agnes and Thomas at home. Also twelve grandchildren and fourteen great-grandchildren, all of whom will sadly miss his genial presence--especially the members of his household, who have tenderly cared for and ministered to his comfort throughout more than a year's illness.
     In 1868, Mr. Smith first professed faith in Jesus and united with the Baptist church in Lawrence county, later transferring his membership to the Cheshire Baptist Church when he moved there. This faith, in which he remained steadfast, was an anchor to his soul. His life was that of a consistent Christian and bore abundant testimony of his fellowship with the Master whom he loved to serve. He was a lover of the Bible, and ever ready to stand by it and during the last 26 years of his life it was as a lamp to his pathway. Mr. Smith took an active part in the work and interests of his church when able to attend service, and at all times in the cause of Christ and the upholding of His kingdom. Often, indeed, has his voice been lifted up in prayer which deeply moved the hearts of his hearers by its simple fervor and faith, and seemed to ascend straight to the Throne of Grace. His childlike trust he carried with him into the Valley of the Shadow, often expressing himself with, "I am ready and willing to go; I have no fear of death." When at last the Messenger came to bear him away, he was bidding his family farewell and told them the Saviour was with him to carry him through the dark valley. Verily, the Lord was his shepherd whose rod and staff comforted him. His long period of suffering was borne with the patience and cheerfulness of one who humbly bows to the will of the Divine Father.
     Mr. Smith was a veteran of the Civil War, and served his country bravely throughout that long and memorable struggle. He enlisted with the 33rd Ohio, and rendered noble service in numerous battles. He was taken prisoner at the battle of Stone River and was confined for three months in Libby prison. He was a Christian gentleman, a loyal patriot, loving husband, kind father, good neighbor and worthy citizen, respected by the entire community.
     The funeral services were conducted Saturday morning, June 13, at the Cheshire F.W.B. Church by Rev. W.J. Fulton of Rio Grande. A large concourse of friends and a body of G.A.R. veterans assembled to pay their last tribute of respect. The interment took place in the Middleport cemetery. The family desire to express their thanks to the kind neighbors and friends for their sympathy and for the beautiful floral offerings.
     A Friend

Gallia Times
June 24, 1914
Transcribed by Henny Evans


Smith, Rev. Jacob

Rev. Mr. Smith Dead
     Rev. Jacob Smith,  United Brethren minister of Vinton, an old soldier and highly esteemed, died at Vinton at noon Thursday, leaving a wife and fourteen living children.  His funeral will be Saturday morning at 10 o'clock.  Burial at Pine Street [sic] cemetery.

[Note: Co. I, 53rd OVI; actually buried in Pine Grove Cemetery in Morgan Township.]

Gallipolis Daily Tribune
July 19, 1907
Transcribed by Nancy McMillan


Smith, James Munroe

J.M. Smith, Civil War Veteran Passes
     James Munroe Smith, 85, a veteran of the Civil War, passed away at his home here Monday evening at six o'clock after a long illness from complications. The aged veteran was a member of Capt. Aleshire's company of the 18th Battery of Ohio.
     He is survived by his widow and one daughter, Mary, age 12. Funeral services will be held Wednesday at 2 p.m. from the Epworth M.E. church on upper Second avenue with burial in Pine Street cemetery by Wetherholt and Entsminger.

Gallipolis Daily Tribune
July 7, 1925
Transcribed by Henny Evans


Smith, James T.

James T. Smith was born in May 1836 in Ohio. He married Rachel Hawk Ewing, a widow, in 1890. He was a farmer. He served in Co.B, 91st Ohio Volunteer Infantry and died August 11, 1915. He is buried in Piper
Cemetery in Meigs County, Ohio.

Created obit from Nancy Hank Ewing research and war records
August 1915
Created by Henny Evans


Smith, Julius D.

Death of a Soldier
     Julius D. Smith, brother of Clifford Smith, of this city, died at the Soldiers' Home at Dayton, Wednesday, and was buried there. Mr. Smith had not seen him for 36 years.

Gallipolis Bulletin
January 29, 1909
Vol. XLI No. 5
Transcribed by Jan Rader                                                                               Top of Page


Smith, Sara A.

Sara A. (Safford) Winslow/Smith

Daughter Of First Settler Of This City Dies In Proctorville
Burial In Mound Hill For Civil War Nurse Whose Father Cut First Tree For Gallipolis Settlement In 1790.
     An interesting and beloved figure in Proctorville was removed yesterday by the death of a heart attack of Mrs. Sara A. Smith at the age of 87, and after a residence in that community for 65 years.
     She was the granddaughter of Robert Safford, Founder of the Town of Gallipolis, and was the last member of the old pioneer family.  As a young woman she served as a nurse in the Civil War, and it was at the close of this conflict that she married E. E. Winslow of New York, on August 26, 1863.  She became a widow after a few years and on July 18, 1869, in Gallipolis she became the wife of William Smith, a brother of D. L. Smith, prominent resident of Huntington.
     Thirty years ago she became a cripple as a result of jumping from a vehicle driven by a pair of frightened horses. Until the time of her death yesterday, she had been confined to her home during the entire period since her accident with the exception of one time when upon her request she was taken out in the last presidental election to cast her vote.
     Funeral services will be held at 1 o'clock today at the Proctorville Methodist Episcopal Church, with Rev. Harden, Pastor, officating. Burial will be in Mound Hill Cemetery at Gallipolis.
     Surviving Mrs. Smith are three great nieces, Mrs. John Davis, Mrs. Clark Miller, and Mrs. Will Blazer, great nephew Pearle Hereford, and a brother-in-law D. I. Smith.  There are no living children.
Ironton Tribune.

Gallipolis Daily Tribune
Volume XXXV
Number 253
October 25, 1929
Gallipolis, Ohio

Civil War Nurse: 30 Years An Invalid, Dies At Proctorville; Father Founder Of Gallipolis.

Ironton Evening Tribune
Volume 4
Number 291
October 21, 1929
Ironton, Ohio

Transcribed By: MLT                                                                                      Top of Page


Smith, Sara A.

     Col. Robert Safford of Marietta cut down the first tree on the site of Gallipolis in 1790. He came here in the summer of that year with a number of young men from Marietta under direction of Gen. Putnam, who had the contract to build cabins and a stockade where the city park now is, for the housing and protection from Indians of the French settlers who arrived in October.
     Co. Safford's daughter died last week in Ironton and was buried in Mound Hill cemetery. The following is taken from the Ironton Tribune:

     An interesting and beloved figure in Proctorville was removed yesterday by the death from a heart attack of Mrs. Sara A. Smith at the age of 87, and after a residence in that community for 65 years.
     She was the daughter of Robert Safford, founder of the town of Gallipolis, and was the last member of this old pioneer family. As a young woman she served as a nurse in the Civil War, and it was at the close of this conflict that she married E. F. Winslow of New York, on August 26, 1863. She became a widow after a few years and on July 18, 1869, in Gallipolis she became the wife of William Smith, a brother of D. I. Smith, prominent resident of Huntington.
     Thirty years ago she became a cripple as a result of jumping from a vehicle driven by a pair of frightened horses. Until the time of her death yesterday, she had been confined to her home during the entire period since her accident with the exception of one time when upon her request she was taken out in the last presidential election to cast her vote.
     Funeral services will be held at one o'clock today at the Proctorville Methodist Episcopal church, with Rev. Harden, pastor, officiating. Burial will be in the Mound Hill cemetery at Gallipolis.

[Note: Born - March 9, 1842; Died - October 19, 1929]

Gallia Times
October 31, 1929
Transcribed by Irene Hively Blamer


Smith, William

     Mr. William Smith, father of Charles A. and Elmer Smith, former merchants of this city, died at his home near Wales, Friday of last week, aged 82 years, 5 months, and 22 days. He was the oldest resident of Greenfield township and had lived where he died for 52 years. He was a veteran of the civil war and a member of the Methodist church. Mr. Smith was highly respected by all who knew him and leaves a wide circle of friends to mourn his demise.

Gallipolis Bulletin
March 2, 1906
Transcribed by Jan Rader                                                                               Top of Page


Smootz, Henry

Death of Henry Smootz
     Mr. Henry Smootz, a former resident of this city, died at his home at Vigo, Ross County, Ohio, last Tuesday [Jan 16,1906]. He was a brother of Mrs John Howell and an uncle of Mrs Charles Baker, of this city. He was a soldier during the Civil War and a prominent Odd Fellow.

[Note: date of death from birthday calculator]

Gallipolis Bulletin
Friday, Jan 19, 1906                                      
Transcribed by Ernie Wright


Soles, Thaddeus Franklin

     Mr. Thaddeus Soles an aged soldier of Ewington, whose serious illness has been mentioned and whose life has just been hanging in the balance for many days, passed peacefully away Monday evening about 5:30. The funeral was held Wednesday at 2:30. Burial in charge of Undertaker Butler.

The Gallia Times
Gallipolis, Ohio
January 27, 1921
Vol. XXIII No. 4 p. 1

Obituary
     Thaddeus Franklin Soles was born Jan. 17, 1847, and died Jan. 24, 1921, aged 74 years and 7 days. He united with the church while a young man and tried to live a Christian life by words and actions as his life in this community for the past 48 years will testify.
     In 1870 he was united in marriage to Elizabeth Zimmerman, who departed this life in 1902. To this union were born children, three of whom survive - Elmer of Wilkesville, Lydia of Pittsburgh and Frank of Des Moines, Iowa. Jennie died when an infant.
     In 1906 he was married to America Allen, who left to mourn his departure. In his home he was a kind husband and father and will be sadly missed by those left behind. He was a good neighbor, and always willing to help in any way he could. Throughout his long and severe illness he was cheerful and patient and bore his sufferings without complaint, saying he was ready to go whenever the Lord called him. It seems fitting to close this brief eulogy with the following lines from "The Village Blacksmith:"

"Toiling, rejoicing, sorrowing,
Onward through life he goes;
Each morning sees some task begun,
Each evening sees its close;
Something attempted, something done
Has earned a night's repose."

     The funeral was conducted at the Ewington M. E. Church by Rev. Cremeans, burial in the Ewington cemetery by Undertaker Butler.

[Note: Buried in Ewington Cemetery in Huntington Township; per Cogar research, served in Co. F, 195th OVI]

The Gallia Times
Gallipolis, Ohio
Thursday, February 3, 1921
Vol. XXIII No. 5
Transcribed by Jan Rader                                                                               Top of Page


Sowards, John

Sowards, John

Death of John Sowards
     Mr. John Sowards, of Crown City, died suddenly Saturday evening August 8, 1903. He had been in his usual health and was making arrangements to go a fishing bout [sic] in a week. He told his wife he did not feel well and he believed he would lie down and did go and lie down on the bed. Shortly after his wife heard him breathing heavily and saw something was wrong but before she could summon any one he passed away, presumably with heart trouble. He left besides his wife a son Mr. Homer Sowards of the firm of Sowards & Stevers of this city, and a married daughter. He was a good soldier and anhonest, honorable man, whose word was good, and who had a big generous heart in him. We have known John for many years and liked him and regret with many others to hear of his death.

Gallipolis Daily Tribune
August 10, 1903
Transcribed by Henny Evans

Death of John Sowards
     Mr. John Sowards died at his home in Crown City on Saturday, August 8, 1903, at 10 o'clock p.m. He was born July 22, 1833, and leaves a wife, one son, one daughter and four sisters.
     Mr. Sowards served throughout the war, being a member Co. D, 5th W. Va. Vol. Inf., and was in more than 100 engagements. He was then ex-Commander of George Crook Post, G. A. R., at Crown City.
     The funeral services were conducted Sunday at the M. E. Church by Rev. John W. Carrol, the burial took place at the Rucker cemetery.

Gallipolis Bulletin
August 14, 1903
Transcribed by Jan Rader


Spain, Samuel

Samuel Spain's Widow Granted Pension
     J.L. Canterbury, pension attorney, of Gallipolis, has been notified that Congressman Foster has introduced a bill in Congress granting a pension of $30 per month to Martha Spain, widow of Samuel Spain, Co. E, U.S. Colored Infantry, in the Civil War.

[Note: There is a Mattie Spain who died here April 25, 1922, born 1849. She is possibly Martha. No further information on Samuel.]

Gallipois Daily Tribune
August 25, 1921
Transcribed by Henny Evans


Spangler, John F.

     The subject of this sketch was born at Guyandotte, Virginia, April 11th, 1822, and died at his home in Clay township July 18th, 1901. During his boyhood and early manhood he was a resident of central Illinois, and throughout his life always longed for the broad and fertile fields of the mighty valley. He was married to Mary Loucks of Harrison township about 1845, and very soon thereafter they took up their residence at the exact spot where he died. For more than fifty years they lived and toiled together, rearing a large family, five of whom survive him, four having preceded to the life beyond. The living children are Wm. T. and John Spangler, both of Iowa, Mrs. Annie Carter and Mrs. Ella Lusher, of this county, and Mrs. Hattie Tope of Jackson county. The wife remains to mourn to the end a strong, earnest and devoted husband, and a wise, firm, but wonderfully kind and helpful father.
     During all the years of thier married life they lived on the homestead where he died except for a year or two, when he rented his farm, sold his stock and purchased a half interest in a flouring mill in this city, becoming a partner with the late Junius L. Newsom. He remained here for a year or two and then returned to the farm. He was an expert miller, but doubtless was more at home on the farm.
     John Spangler was a man of much more than ordinary intellectual powers, and in every way was a strong, forceful and independent character. His mind was ever on the alert for anything that would benefit humanity and community. He was not a politician and he was not always popluar, but he was a strong diplomat and usually accomplished whatever he undertook. He was too independent, too self reliant, too proud in a sense to be a popular idol, but no man had a warmer heart or greater public spirit. He was the idol of his family and who knew him best, and ever ready and willing to assist those desiring help. In all his work he was cool, calculating and methodic, and wonderfully skillful. He was always thrifty, his bond as good as his gold, and his word as good as his bond. He was a successful farmer, always able to accumulate with ease and never the victim of hard times or disaster and was never heard to complain. He was active, courageous, seemingly an absolute stranger to physical fear. In the accomplishment of his purpose he was persistent, insistent and tireless. His greatest public benefit, and the one that ought to hand his name down to unborn generations, was his advocacy of improved roads. While others were convinced of the wisdom of the movement and every ready to assist, he alone kept up the agitation with tongue and pen, never faltering, never hesitating until the work was accomplished.
     It is to be regretted that he could not remain to enjoy the fruits of his labor. But, it was not for him to escape the common doom of man, and after long suffering he laid down his life with the same courage, the same cheerfulness that had marked his long and useful life. He will be missed.

[Note: He is buried in Cottrell Cemetery in Clay Township and he served as a Squirrel Hunter as a Private from Clay Township.]

Gallipolis Daily Tribune
July 19, 1901
Transcribed by Henny Evans


Spear, William

Aged Veteran Passes
William Spear Victim of Pneumonia after Only Three Days Illness
     William Spear, a veteran of the Civil War, died at 10 o'clock this Monday morning, July 2, 1923, at his home near Patriot following only three days of illness with pneumonia. He was in his eightieth year and had lived in Gallia county six years of age, Jackson county being the place of his birth.
     The widow, six boys and three girls survive. They are: Mrs. James Tipton of this county, Ernest of the Chillicothe road, Ezra and Will of this city, Everett, Frank, Emory, Ola and Flora at home.
     The funeral will be held at the home Tuesday at 2 p.m. with burial following at Mound Hill cemetery by Geo. J. Wetherholt and Son.

[Note: He served in Co. G, 1st Ohio Volunteer Heavy Artilery.]

Gallipolis Daily Tribune
July 2, 1923
Transcribed by Henny Evans

Spear, William

IN MEMORY
     William Spear, son of Matthew and Sarah Winner Spear, was born in Jackson county, Ohio, Dec. 19, 1843, and departed this life July 2, 1923, aged 79 years, 6 months and 12 days.
     He enlisted in the Civil War in Co. G, First Ohio Heavy Artillery, and served three years and was honorably discharged on June 16, 1865.
     On Feb. 15, 1866, he was united in marriage to Miss Mary L. Graham, daughter of the late Mr. John Graham, and Mrs. Elizabeth Gills Graham. To this union were born eight sons and five daughters, four of these having preceded him to the Great Beyond. He leaves to mourn their loss his widow, three daughters and six sons. They are Everett, Frank, Emory, Flora and Ola at home, Mrs. James Tipton of Northup, William, Ezra and Ernest of Gallipolis and six grandchildren. He also leaves one brother, Mr. Ben Spear of Centreville, Wash.
     He was converted and united with the Harrison Freewill Baptist church in 1891, and since that time has ever remained a consistent Christian until he was called by his Blessed Master to join the church triumphant. Those who knew him well can best testify to his goodness. He devoted his entire life to his family and his friends. Any sacrifice, however great, he always cheerfully made and bent all his efforts and energies to the upbuilding and betterment of humanity. Since he is gone his gentle words can be heard no more. His place is vacant in the home where he will be greatly missed. The home that was once cheerful and happy is now sad and lonely without him. But we can be consoled in the thought that he has gone to live with his Redeemer, and our loss is his eternal gain. During his last illness, which lasted only three days, he was never heard to murmur or complain though his sufferings were great his face wore that cheerful and peaceful look which comes from a pure and unsullied life.

Precious father he has left us,
Left us yes forevermore;
But we hope to meet our loved one
On that bright and happy shore.

Card of Thanks
     We desire to extend our sincere thanks to our neighbors and friends who were so kind and considerate during the sad hours or our bereavement of our dear husband and father; also to Rev. Denney for his consoling words and to the undertaker, Mr. Wetherholt, and to the choir for their beautiful selections.
Mrs. William Spear and Children

Found in scrapbook
1923
Transcribed by Henny Evans                                                                           Top of Page


Spires, Jacob

Jacob Spires, 97,Struck by Train, Killed
Old Soldier, Known for his Vigor, Meets Death at Crossing in Marion
     MARION, O. - Sept. 26: Jacob C. Spires, 97 year old Civil War veteran whose health was so good that his doctor had predicted that he would live to be 105, was killed today by a freight train at a city crossing. A native of Gallia county, he declined to wear spectacles and often had gone on long trips, recently having returned from a visit with his son in Memphis, Tenn.
     When Mr.Spires gave up his home near Alice about five years ago many friends thought he was perhaps the most vigorous Union veteran living anywhere, those who know "Uncle Perry" Brumfield of Waterloo might have had a different opinion. He left Gallia county, where he had spent most of his years, to live with his son-in-law and daughter, Mr. and Mrs. William Vance, 456 Park street, Marion, and his son, Homer, at Johnstown, Ohio. The son living in Memphis and referred to in the dispatch from Marion is Howard Spires.

Was Ill But Once
     Nearly two years ago the Marion Star had a big "write-up" of this old soldier, who had walked a mile,
carrying a suitcase, in sub-freezing temperature, to a bus station on the first lap of a Christmas trip to
Johnstown. At that time he told a reporter he had never been ill enough to need a physician but once and that was when he was suffering from arthritis a year before he left this county. Plenty of work and plain food were credited for his good health.
     When he was but eight years old his parents died, and he made his home with an uncle until his marriage
in 1866. But for four years previous to that he served as a soldier, a member of Co. B, 36th Ohio Infantry. He and Mrs. Spires rounded out 58 years of married life before her death in 1924. They lived for a while in Meigs county and at different periods he has served as constable, township trustee, school board member and was once commander of the G.A.R. post at Ewington. He was born and reared in Morgan tp.
     Although in dozens of battles, Mr. Spires came through the war unscathed. "Once while we were lying on
the ground during an engagement a bullet hit me on the shoulder, but its force was nearly spent and it did not penetrate the leather of my ammunition belt," he has related. He served under Gen. Philip Sheridan and among the noted battles in which he took part were South Mountain, Antietam, Chickamauga, Mission Ridge and Lookout Mountain.
     Mr. Spires was credited with being the oldest Odd Fellow in Ohio and was a member of Vinton lodge 799.
Wednesday morning Vernon McCoy of Butler McCoy of Vinton will go to Marion and bring back the body.
Funeral services will be held at 1 o'clock Thursday afternoon at the Danville Church of Christ with Rev. H.F.
Bolton of Rutland in charge. Burial at Coy Hill (Meigs County, Ohio).

Gallipolis Daily Tribune
September 29, 1938
Transcribed by Henny Evans


Sprague, Henry C.

     Henry C. Sprague was born in Gallipolis, Ohio, October 26, 1844, and died in Winona, Kansas, September 12, 1909. Being 64 years, 10 months and 16 days old. He enlisted in the war at the age of 18, in company G, 7th Mo. Calvary, and served his country for 4 years and 4 months till the close of the war. He was a member of the Chalk Mound Post No. 348 of the Grand Army of the Republic and was Quarter Master for 10 years.
     On October 6, 1867 he was united in marriage to Miss H.R. McLain and located at Hiawatha, Brown County, Kansas. In 1885 he moved to Wabaunsee County where he resided until 1904, when he moved
to Logan County, settling in Winona, where he died. He leaves a wife, six sons and four daughters to mourn his departure, besides a host of friends. 3 sons and 3 daughters were present at the funeral.
     Brother Sprague was converted about 8 years ago and joined the United Brethren Church. He has been a constant sufferer for many years with the Asthma, but bore his affliction patiently, waiting for the time to come when he should be called to a land where affliction never comes. He was a kind husband, a loving father and a true and patriotic citizen. The funeral was conducted at the house Monday afternoon by Rev. Davis and his body placed in the cemetery to wait the general resurrection. C.A. Davis

[Note: He is buried in Winona Cemetery in Winona, Logan County, Kansas.]

From scrapbook
September 1909
Transcribed by Henny Evans


Sprague, John E.

John Sprague Dead
     John E. Sprague, a veteran of the Civil War, died at his home near Evergreen, August 26, 1914. He was born in 1838 and was 75 years and 8 months old. In early life he accepted Christ as his Saviour and united with Westerman M. E. Church, where he lived a faithful Christian until his death. Because of feeble health he was not permitted the last years of his life to attend church services. His every day life gave evidence of his faith in God and of his hope of heaven.
     He was twice married, his first wife being Margaret Sexton. To this union were born five children, three boys and two girls, all of whom survive him. His second wife, Huldah Boggs, preceeded him several years to the better land. He was a true patriot and soldier, a peaceful citizen, a good neighbor, a kind and indulgent father, and the surviving kindred are comforted in the truth that "he hath entered into the rest that remains for the children of God." His funeral service was held at the Westerman Church Friday afternoon by Rev. W. F. Fulton. Burial near Prospect by Glassburn.
W. J. F.

Gallipolis Bulletin
September 3, 1914
No. 36 p. 7

Death of Jno. E. Sprague
     John E. Sprague, a civil war veteran, residing near Bidwell, and aged 75 years, died Wednesday night of disease of the kidneys. He was a good neighbor and kind father and quite prominent and well to do. The remains were interred Friday.
     He left sons, Elza and Emory S. of Bidwell and Edward M. of Cleveland. Daughters Mrs. Maggie Stone of Addison and Mrs. Fannie Mossman of Bidwell.

[Note: From Cogar research, served in Co. D, 179th OVI]

Gallipolis Journal
September 4, 1914
Vol. 96
Transcribed by Jan Rader                                                                           Top of Page


Squires, Rufus

Rufus Squires, G.A.R.
     Rufus Squires, colored, who moved to Columbus about ten years ago, died there at the home of his daughter, Mrs. Frances Bell, Sunday. He resided in Gallipolis until that time, having lived here since the close of the Civil War, in which he participated. His remains will be brought to Gallipolis on Wednesday, at the home of his step son, John Allen, and his funeral and burial will take place Thursday at the Paint Creek Baptist Church.

[Note: He is buried in Pine Street Colored Cemetery in Gallipolis Township and he served in Co. E, 27th USCT.]

Gallipolis Daily Tribune
May 12, 1924
Transcribed by Henny Evans


St. Clair, Alfred

Old Soldier Dead
     Mr. Alfred St. Clair, 78, an old soldier, died at his home in this city Friday. The funeral was held Sunday, burial in Mound Hill cemetery.

[Note: Co. B, 13th West Virginia Infantry]

The Gallia Times
March 10, 1921
Transcribed by Jan Rader                                                                               Top of Page


Stevens, A. W.

Death of A. W. Stevens
     Death invaded the home of A. W. Stevens, living near Adamsville, this county, Wednesday, and removed from this life that venerable gentleman. He had been in failing health for over two years and was sixty-three years of age. He was a soldier in the 91st Ohio Infantry and served his country almost three years. In the fall of 1864 he was captured in the Shenandoah valley and was an inmate of Libby prison for five months. He was a member of the I. Z. Haning (?) Post G.A.R. at Rio Grande, and is the third member that has died since the organization of the post two years ago.
     Mr. Stevens was an active business man and has left a very fine farm and home to his family. He leaves a wife and six children. His son William resides in Texas; Amos near his father's home and Eugene and Lucy still reside at the parental home. Mrs. Dora Denney, of Springfield township, and Mrs. Maggie Wood, of Columbus, are the other children. All except William were with their father in his last sickness. Mr. Stevens was buried at Calvary cemetery in Rio Grande Friday forenoon. The sermon was preached by Prof. J. M. Davis and interment was by the Grand Army Post.

Gallipolis Journal
July 6, 1897
Transcribed by Jan Rader


Stevers, John Lafayette

J.L. Stevers Dies Early Hour Today
Former Co. Commissioner Served with Credit and Honor in Public Offices for Half or More of His 90 years---Funeral at Bethel 2 Wednesday
     Death ended the long career of John Lafayette Stevers, one of the county's best-known men, at 2:45 this morning at the home of his daughter, Mrs. Oma Williams, in Crown City. He had been failing perceptibly for several months and had been bedfast most of the time for three or four weeks.
     Mr. Stevers served two terms as county commissioner, probably spent a half century in the public service, holding various positions of public trust, and was one of the trustees of Gallipolis tp. at the time of his death. He was 90 years old. Born February 29, 1844, he had become a bit confused about his age in the last few years and many had believed him to be but 86.
     Despite his advanced age, Mr. Stevers retained his interest in public affairs and in those about him up till his last illness. His vision and hearing and memory were such that he could call hundreds of persons by their names and he had acquaintances and friends on about every section of land in his native county.
     Details of his life and family connections will be withheld, as an obituary is now being prepared. [Checking of the next few newspapers did not lead to more information.]
     Funeral services will be conducted by Rev. Mr. Maddox of Crown City at Bethel church back of Bladen at 2 o'clock Wednesday. Burial will be there under the auspices of Masons of Crown City. The body will be brought to the home of Mrs. T.A. Haskins, a daughter, on Garfield avenue, Tuesday morning. Friends may view it there.

[Note: He served in Co. F., USCI.]

Gallipolis Daily Tribune
May 14, 1934
Transcribed by Henny Evans                                                                           Top of Page


Stewart, David

Death Of An Old Soldier
     David Stewart, aged 82 years and a well known old soldier passed away Sunday, March 7, after a short illness with catarrh of the stomach.
     He was a son of Jesse Stewart and was born in Gallia County, where he has always lived. He was twice married and is survived by a widow and one daughter, Mrs. Martin of Mason County, W. Va.
The funeral was held Tuesday morning at the Lincoln Ridge church and the burial was in charge of Undertaker Wetherholt.

[Note: from death certificate, buried in Dickey Cemetery in Harrison Township; b. April 2, 1833; from Cogar research, served in Co. H, 32nd OVI]

Gallipolis Journal
March 12, 1915
Transcribed by Jan Rader


Stewart, Frederick G.

Fred Stewart Dead
     Frederick G. Stewart, one of Rio Grande's best citizens, passed away Friday morning, Nov. 27, 1914. He was 68 years of age and had been in failing health for a long time. The funeral was held under the auspices of the Centreville lodge of Masons on Sunday morning. Rev. W. J. Fulton delivered the funeral sermon and Prof. C. O. Clark read an obituary.
     Mr. Stewart was a Civil War veteran, having enlisted in Company G, Ohio Heavy Artillery. He had been a consistent member of the Methodist Church. Mr. Stewart is survived by his wife, Fannie S. Lawrence Stewart, and three daughters, Mrs. Ethel Neal of Mt. Sterling, Mrs. E. Y. Neal of Lockbourne and Mrs. Frank M. McKeever of Marion. Two sons died a number of years ago. The bereaved family has the sympathy of many friends in their loss.

[Note: Buried in Calvary Baptist Cemetery in Raccoon Township]

Gallipolis Bulletin
December 3, 1914
No. 47 p. 1
Transcribed by Jan Rader                                                                               Top of Page


Stewart, R.L.

     Mr. R. L. Stewart:—Sir:—The following is the record of soldiers in Co. G, 4th Va. Vol. Inf't., who enlisted from Gallia county, O. and died in the service.

[Note: This is probably the 4th West Virginia. No further information could be found.]

Gallipolis Journal
September 21, 1865
Transcribed by Eva Swain Hughes


Stone, John A.

Taps Sound for Aged John Stone
'Tis Believed He Was County's Oldest Citizen---His Death Leaves but Three Old Soldiers in Gallipolis
Funeral at 2 Wednesday

     Death came to the venerable John A. Stone at his home on upper Second avenue at 1:30 this morning.
If the family record or tradition as to his age is correct, he would have been 99 on Dec. 16 and
doubtless was the oldest person in the county. The roster of Ohio's Civil War soldiers indicates his age was 95 years, as he enlisted at the age of 22 on Sept. 21, 1861, at Portsmouth. During his last illness he witnessed amazing vitality, just as in his young manhood he was noted locally for his strength and endurance.

Head of Big Family
     "Uncle John," as he was affectionately called, had spent nearly all his years in this community and
enjoyed the respect and esteem of old and young alike. He was a native of Boone county, W.Va.
He was twice married. His first wife was Rebecca Baldwin (who died in 1915) and they became the parents
of 13 children. Six daughters and four sons preceded him in death and the following survive: Mrs. Fanny Sheline, Logan, O.; Mrs. Blanch Robbins, Pt. Pleasant, and Mrs. Lottie Mayes, also of Mason county. Mrs. George A. Tabit of this city was a granddaughter and was a frequent visit[or] to his bedside during his long illness. Mr. Stone's second wife was Samantha Boster, who survives him.
     As a soldier Mr. Stone was a member of that memorable band of Gallia county boys who went forth with
J.H.M. Montgomery as captain of co. F, 33 O.V.I. Mr. Stone was discharged in October, 1863, at Cincinnati on a surgeon's certificate of disability. His captain was promoted to a lieutentant colonel in 1863 and for many
years after the war was a leading figure in county affairs. After his return here, Mr. Stone became a drayman and was so engaged for many years. For another extended period ending perhaps a score of years ago he carried the mail between Gallipolis and Maple Shade.
     Funeral services will be conducted by Rev. H.H. Wilbur at Grace M.E. church at 2 o'clock Wednesday.
Burial will be in Pine Street cemetery by Undertaker Oscar E. Elliott.

12 on the Honor Roll
     Since Mr. Stone's death there remain but 12 Union soldiers in the county, according to the Tribune's
compilation. They are:

Dr. A.B. Garrett, John H. Cherrington and J.W. King, City route.
M.C. Boice of Cheshire rural.
Thomas White, Harvey Russell, Vinton.
Jacob Spires, Alice.
F.M. Brookman, Kerr.
David Edwards, Greenfield tp.
T.J. Clark and John Gillespie, Thurman.
Fred Klages, Northup (walnut tp.).
     Does any reader of this paper know of another old soldier in the county? Seven months ago there were 16, counting Levi Searls of Marion and Kyger, who died on April 25. During the summer Hugh P. Halley of Bladen and James Turner Smith of Porter died.

[Note: James Madison Gatewood is left out of this account; he died in 1943. Hugh P. Halley did not die until
1937.]

Gallipolis Daily Tribune
December 3, 1934
Transcribed by Henny Evans                                                                    Top of Page

Stone, Madison H

Death of Madison H. Stone
     Mr. Madison H. Stone, a well known carpenter, died at his home on Second Street, Sunday evening, October 28, 1895. Deceased was born in Boditot, Madison County, VA, March 28, 1822, from which place he removed to Point Pleasant, thence here about seven years since.
     Mr. Stone was of a retiring disposition, but always polite and kind of man; an affectionate husband and father and a good citizen, all that could be desired of anyone.
     He was a member of the 13th. Virginia Regiment and was at one time a member of the Odd Fellows. Deceased had been a sufferer for years with heart disease and rheumatism which caused his demise.
     Funeral will occur at the family residence, Tuesday afternoon at 2 o'clock, Rev. Dillon officiating and Hayward & Son depositing the remains in Pine Street Cemetery. The afflicted family will be sympathized with in their sorrow.

Gallipolis Journal
October 30, 1895 Vol LX, No. 1
Transcribed by F.K. Brown


Stone, Richard D.

Rev. R.D. Stone Dropped Dead
     Rev. Richard D. Stone, aged 78, a well known minister of the Christian Church residing at Addison, dropped dead across the railroad track a short distance below his home Thursday afternoon late. His wife was with him at the time, and managed to roll his body from the rails just before a freight train came by.
Dr.C.C. Barton was called, but he was beyond all medical aid. The body was carried to his home by neighbors.
     The funeral was held Sunday at the Baptist Church in Addison by the Rev. Reed, the interment following in the Leonard cemetery.
     Rev. Stone is survived by his wife, Mrs. Susan Stone, and a brother, Mr. John Stone residing in East Gallipolis. He was a soldier of the Civil War in the 9th Virginia, and had long been a Minister of the Gospel.

[Note: He actually served in Co. B, 9th West Virginia Volunteer Infantry and Co. I, 1st W.V.V.I. He is buried in what is now known as Addison Reynolds Cemetery with dates 1840-1920.]

Gallia Times
March 1, 1920
Transcribed by Henny Evans


Stormont, S.B.

Death of S. B. Stormont

     Mr. J.W. Stormont telegrahped his brother, Mr. A.J. Stormont from Dighton, Kas., yesterday stating that he got there just in time to see his father, Mr. S.B. Stormont, buried, he having died Tuesday. The deceased went to Kansas with his family in the spring of '85.
     He was born in Westmoreland, County, Pa., and came to Lawrence County, with his parents when he was 14 years of age. He after marriage went to housekeeping in Guyan township, and lived there 13 years, moving to Harrison township, where he lived until he went to Kansas. He was a highly moral, good citizen, commanding the highest respect of all who knew him. He was a soldier and member of John Leeper Post of this county. He was born in 1830.

[Note: the 1880 census shows this to be Sam B. Stormont and his sons are John W. and Augustus among others. His Civil War unit was the 173rd OVI.]

Gallipolis Daily Tribune
September 11, 1897
Transcribed by Henny Evans                                                                           Top of Page


Straight, Lewis

Straight, Lewis

Death of Aged Man
     Lewis Straight, one of the oldest men in the county, passed away in his home near Waterloo the first of the week and was buried there Thursday. He was close to 90 years of age and was a fine old citizen. His widow and the following children survive; Mrs. Joseph Baker of Waterloo, Mrs. Pearle McCarley of Bladen and John Straight of Bethesda.

November 3, 1919
Gallipolis Daily Tribune
Transcribed by Cheryl A. Enyart

OBITUARY - Straight
     Lewis Straight, son of Silas C. and Sarah Atwood Straight, was born March 5, 1839, in Muskingum County, Ohio, died Nov. 3, 1919, aged 80 years, 7 months and 29 days.
     Mr. Straight was one of a family of nine children, all of whom preceded him to the Great Beyond save one sister, Mrs. Permelia Knox, who made her home with the deceased for several years last past.
     Mr. Straight removed with his parents to Lawrence County, Ohio, where he grew to manhood and at the breaking out of the late Civil War he heard his Country's call and volunteered in Co. H, 9th W. Va. Inf., said regiment being later consolidated with the 5th W. Va., forming the 1st W. Va. Veterans to which he re-inlisted as a veteran of the great war.
     He was wounded at the battle of Cloyd Mountain, May 9, 1864, and while wounded was taken prisoner and held a prisoner of war for about six months, having been detained in those two famous Confederate prisons of Andersonville and Libby.
     Mr. Straight never recovered from the effects of said wound and the effects of same caused his demise.
Mr. Straight was united in marriage to Mary E. Waddell Dec. 9, 1869, and to this union were born four children, John A. Straight, Sarah E. Baker, Jane Grube, deceased, and Arilla McCarley, three of whom with the wife and mother also survive. He is also survived by seventeen grandchildren.
     Mr. Straight united with the Christian Church at Mt. Vernon about forty-five years ago and was baptized thirty-five years ago, and he always lived in accordance with the teachings of his church.
Uncle Lewis, as he was familiarly called, will be greatly missed and his place can never be filled, but we must bow in submission to Him, who doeth all things well.

A precious father from us has gone,
A voice we loved is stilled,
A place is vacant in our home
Which never can be filled.
God in his wisdom hath recalled,
Our Father, we loved so dear,
And though the body moulders here,
His soul is safe with thee.

The funeral services were conducted by Rev. Orval Hall on Wednesday, November 5 at Flag Springs. Burial by undertaker Albert E. Tope.

[Note: Has stone; buried in Flag Springs in WA]

Gallipolis Bulletin
November 13, 1919; p. 5
Transcribed by Jan Rader                                                                               Top of Page


Stuart, Charles

Death of Capt. Chas. Stuart
     Our citizens will one and all be pained to hear of the death of Capt. Charles Stuart, of Lincoln, Harrison Township, Sunday night, September 25th 1898.
     Our particulars of his death are somewhat meagre, not having seen any of his relatives, but it currently reported that he was seized with apoplexy, passing away soon after.  It is known that he had been ill for a week or more with something like a stroke , but rallied and seemed much better Saturday and it is said was about the house Saturday and Sunday.  Undertaker Wetherholt went out this morning to look after the body, and on his return we may have further particulars.  His death casts a gloom over his many acquaintances here where he was universally known and highly esteemed.
     He was the son of Robert and Letitia Stuart, and was born in Guernsey County, this State, coming to this County and locating in Harrison Township in 1846.  October 12, 1848 he was united in marriage with Missouri J. Mc Call, a native of the County, who only a few years ago preceeded him to the better land,  He was the father of James R. Stuart, now a resident of Charleston, W. Va., Latitia, deceased, John T. Stuart of Harrison; Wm. S., deceased, Mary Ann, deceased, Mrs. Rachel A., wife of J. P.Cageny, of Catawha Island, O., Mrs. America E, wife of U. S. Townsend of Mount Vernon, O., Mrs. Anna J. Clendenin, wife of J. Will Clendenin, Charles Oscar Stuart, of this City, and Miss Orrie Gertrude Stuart, at home.
     Capt. Stuart was elected sheriff of this County in 1875 and again re-elected in 1872, serving two terms to the entire satisfaction of his republican constituency and the people.  He also served as member of the Board of Education of this City and member of the Soldiers' Relief Commission of this County, and perhaps in various other places of trust and responsibility and was always a welcome personage in any gathering, where his proverbial good nature and ever ready wit added
cheerfulness and pleasure.
     He served in the Civil War as First Lieutenant in Company E, 141st O. N. G. a full term and was mustered out September 1864, re-enlisting in February 1865, recruiting a company attached to the 193D. O. V. I. and served till the close of the war.  He was tall amd commanding in appearance and whoever seen his striking resemblance to President Lincoln was commented upon a fact in which Capt. Stuart took much pride, and there is no doubt but that in mind disposition he was much like him.  Harrison Township has not lost a better citizen in her history than Charles Stuart, and residing in this City for twenty years as he did, and owning nice property here until recently, we feel as well as Harrison that we have lost a good citizen as well as she.
     The funeral services of the late Capt. Charles Stuart will be conducted at his late home at Lincoln Wednesday morning most likely by Rev. E. H. Gelvin.  The funeral cortege will then start to Gallipolis, escorted by the members of the G. A. R. Post of Lincoln. On arriving at this city, they will be met by Col. Cadot Post of this City, of which he was a member, and the remains taken to Pine Street Cemetery and intered by Undertaker Wetherholt under the auspices of Cadot Post.  The Pall Beareres will be selected from Cadot Post.
     Capt. Stuart was 72 years old.  He had been improving from his illness up to Sunday evening.  His son John and family were with him Sunday evening and they had sit around and talked pleasantly until about half past 9 o'clock, when they bid him good night and the folks went to bed, leaving him preparing to retire.  John had not much more than got up stairs when he heard him fall and ran down stairs and found him on the floor.  He gasped twice and was gone.  It is supposed that agreeable with his custom he had knelt for prayer before retiring, and was stricken with death while engaged in devotional exercises.

Gallipolis Daily Tribune
Volume X, Number 75
September 26, 1898
Gallipolis, Ohio
Transcribed by: MLT


Summers, James H., Capt.

     Capt. James H. Summers, the well known steamboats pilot and master, died January 25. He was (born) at Red House, W.Va., December 22, 1829, son of Wm. and Mary Summers. Began as a steamboat clerk at 14. Came here with parents in 1849. Married Elizabeth, daughter of the late Emory Bailey, September 3, 1851.
Ran the blockade of Island No. 10, during the Civil War. Was on the steamer Blue Ridge when she exploded January 8, 1848.
     The widow and following children survive: Wm. E., Edward, Fred, Atty. C.H.D. Summers, Mrs. Mary Willbarger, of Harris, this County. A brother, Frank, survives.

[Note: He is buried in Pine Street Cemetery.]

P.T. Wall, Year by Year
January 25, 1899
Transcribed by Henny Evans


Summers, William

Death of William Summers
     William Summers died at his residence in Gallipolis, Ohio, January 6, 1891, in the 56th year of his age.  Having been sick a long time from a general breaking down of the system, brought on by exposure during the late War.  Mr. Summers was a member of the 18th Ohio Battery, under Captain Charles Aleshire, and was a brave and good soldier.  He was captured by the rebels and lay in a prison a long time, where he contracted the disease from which he died.  He leaves a wife and a son, Frank, to mourn his loss.
     Three brothers still survive him, among them Captain James Summers, of this city.  He was a son of the old veteran California Steamboat Captain W. S. Summers, who still survives him at the advanced age of 87 years, and who is hale and hearty.  Mr. Summers was an engineer by trade. He was an industrious citizen, and a good and kind husband, having a genial and kind disposition.  May his soul rest in peace with his Maker, Who gave it, for the Lord's will must be done.
     A. R. W.

Gallipolis Bulletin
Volume XXIV
Number 9
January 13, 1891
Gallipolis, Ohio

Transcribed By: MLT                                                                                      Top of Page


Swanson, John W.

Died in the Service
     John W. Swanson, aged 21 years, enlisted from Raccoon township, in Co. M, 7th O.V.C., and died of Typhoid Pneumonia, near Somerset, Kentucky, 29th May, 1862, unmarried.

Gallipolis Journal
September 14, 1865
Transcribed by Henny Evans

[The following letter from a soldier in his company is included below.]

Centreville, Ohio June 17, '63

Mr. Harper—Sir:
     By request of friends, during a brief absence on furlough from my Regiment, it becomes my solemn duty to announce through the medium of your Journal the death of John W. Swanson, a Sergeant in Co. M, 7th O. V. C., who departed this life near Somerset, Kentucky, May 29th, 1863, aged 21 years.
     As Mr. Swanson was an old schoolmate, and a warm personal friend of mine, I feel inadequate to the task of eulogizing upon the character of the deceased. He had an intellect which distinguished him among his associates, and with it an amiable disposition, which excited the admiration of all who knew him, and even won the attention of men of distinction, holding positions of honor and trust in society. Nine months ago he bade farewell to home and friends, left behind him his gray haired father and pious mother, to mourn the departure of their favorite and idolized son.
     During his stay in the service, amid the trials and difficulties soldiers are heir to, he was never known to wear an angry look or allow a harsh word to part his innocent lips. Though he had the head of a soldier and the heart of a true patriot, he was not physically constituted to endure the hardships of a soldier's life. The exposure of last winter's campaign fostered a disease which preyed upon the vitals of his physical constitution to such an extent that it soon caused his premature death.
     While we deeply regret the loss of our brother soldier, we feel to sympathize with his agonizing parents who so bitterly mourn over their affectionate son. But let us be consoled with the assurance that John, though no more in this world of sorrow and troubles, enjoys the felicity of Heaven, where wars are no more forever. His soul, immortal as the God who gave it, shall live and bloom in glory throughout the ceaseless ages of eternity.
     John F. White,
     Co. M. 7th O. V. C.

The Gallipolis Journal
June 18, 1863
Transcribed by Eva Swain Hughes                                                                 Top of Page


Swick, John

     John Swick aged 22 years, enlisted in Co. I, 173d O.V.I. Aug. 11th 1864; died at Nashville, Tenn., 30th of Jan. 1865 from measles. Unmarried.

[Note: The above is taken from a list of those who died in the war. He is buried at Clark Chapel Cemetery in Morgan Township. His father received his pension.]

The Gallipolis Journal
August 24, 1865
Transcribed by Eva Swain Hughes


Swick, Martin

     Martin Swick, aged 37 years, enlisted from Morgan township in Co. I, 173d O.V.I. in Aug. 1864, died 3d February, 1865, from Typhoid fever at Nashville, Tenn. Leaves a widow and three children.

[Note: The above is taken from a list of those who died in the war. He is buried at Clark Chapel Cemetery in Morgan Township. His father received his pension.]

Constructed by Henny Evans from military records


Swigert, Marcus Valentine

Death of Marcus V. Swigert
     Marcus Valentine Swigert, aged 73, died last Friday morning at his late residence near Gallipolis after a lingering illness. The funeral services were held on Sunday, with Rev. J. W. McCormick officiating, and the interment was at Mound Hill cemetery.
     Besides his widow, two sons, Marcus and Frank, and two daughters, Stella and Cora, and one brohter, John A. Swigert, of Gallipolis, he leaves to mourn his loss another brother, F. R. Swigert, of Fayetteville, Ark., and one sister, Mrs. Rober Nesbitt, of Downe, Kan.
     The deceased was born near Gallipolis and has resided in Gallia County all his life. He was a veteran of the civil war, having been a member of Troop L., of the 7th Ohio Cavalry, and participated in the raid on Andersonville prison to liberate the Union prisoners when word of Lee's surrender prevented them from carrying out the daring plot. There are now only fifteen members of this troop living.

[Note: from death certificate, b. September 22, 1841, d. October 23, 1914]

Gallipolis Journal
October 30, 1914
Vol. 96 No. 41
Transcribed by Jan Rader


Swisher, David

Death of David Swisher
     Mr. David Swisher, of Cheshire, who died April 6th, after a well spent life, left a wife and four sons to mourn his loss--Thomas, Perry, Ellsworth and James; to all of whom he had been ever kind and indulgent. He was an excellent neighbor and citizen and left quite an account of property. Rev. W.J. Fulton conducted his services at the Baptist Church in Cheshire.

[Note: Died 4/7/1903, 78 years 1 month and 25 days of age. Wife Sarah. Burial Gravel Hill Cemetery. Co. D, 141 Reg O.V.I.]

Gallipolis Daily Tribune
April, 1903
Transcribed by F.K. Brown                                                                             Top of Page


Swisher, Ellis

Death of Ellis Swisher
     Mr. Ellis Swisher, of Cheshire, died last Saturday after an extended illness. The funeral services were conducted by Rev. J. M. Davis, of Rio Grande Monday, interment at Gravel Hill. He was a good citizen and his death will be regretted by a wide circle of friends. He leaves a wife and family.

The Gallipolis Bulletin
August 8, 1902

     Mr. Ellis Swisher of Cheshire, died last Saturday after an illness extending over several months. He left a wife and family. Funeral took place this Monday afternoon conducted by Dr. J. M. Davis, of Rio Grande. Burial at Gravel Hill. He was a fine man and his death is greatly regretted.

[Note: 1835 - August 2, 1902. Civil War Soldier - Co. D. 141st Regiment, Ohio Infantry National Guard (Sergeant)]

Gallipolis Daily Tribune
August 4, 1902
Transcribed by Sandy L. Milliron


Swisher, George Nathan

WELL KNOWN FARMER
Has Gone to His Last Reward
     George N. Swisher, son of Solomon and Nancy (McCarty) Swisher, was born October 31, 1840, died April 4, 1925.
     He was united in marriage to Lucina King, Dec. 26, 1870, who departed this life March 27, 1924. To this union were born Ettie George and Nora Davis of Gallipolis, R.D.; Harlow of Middleport and Maurice of Cheshire.
     Thirteen granchildren, five greatgrandchildren, one half brother, one half sister and a host of loving nieces and nephews are left to mourn the loss of a good man.
     He had builded an unspotted character, alway quiet, modest and sympathetic, and deserves the good name his friends gave him. A ma**y man, a man among men, he respected the opinions of others, was kind and patient with those who differed with him and was always ready to make concessions rather than -break the thread of friendship.
     He never united with any church but gave liberally to its support. He said he would not want to live where there were no churches and he was a firm believer in a true and living God.
     He hated evil in all its forms and loved the good with all his heart. He bore his afflictions with patience and altho blind for three years greeted his friends with a smile until the last.
     All that loving hands could do was done for him but HE who doeth all things well called and he is not, for God took him . He fully realized his time was short and told his son he was getting ready to go.
     The funeral was held at the home, services being conducted by Rev. Mossman. The large number present showed the high esteem in which he was held. The floral offerings were most beautiful. Burial was at Gravel Hill cemetry by Undertaker DeMaine
                      (His grand-daughter Zella L. George)

[Note: Not mentioned was the fact that George N. Swisher served in the Union Army. Pvt Swisher was a member of the Ohio National Guard 16th battalion. He also served in the 141st Regiment of the Ohio Volunteer Infantry. Company D]

Gallipolis Tribune
April 1925.
Contributed by Cheryl Enyart                                                                         Top of Page


Swisher, Jacob C.

Cheshire Resident Passed Away
     Jacob Swisher of Cheshire, who has been ill for some time, passed away Friday afternoon about 3:30 o'clock, death being due to a complication of diseases. The funeral services will be held Sunday morning at the Baptist church at Addison and interment will be made in the cemetery at that place. --Pomeroy News

[Note: He served in Co. D, 141st O.V.I. Dates on stone, 1834-1917.]

Gallia Times
January 24, 1917
Transcribed by Henny Evans

Mr. Swisher Dead
     J.C. Swisher, father of W.S. Swisher, of this city, died at his home in Cheshire, Ohio, Friday afternoon.
Mr. Swisher at the time of his death [was] 82 years and 5 months of age. He was married in 1856 to Electa King, to this union were born the following chidren: Mrs. Minnie Foster, of Delaware, Ohio, Mrs. Cora Shoenfelt, of Addison, S.V. Swisher, of Radcliff, O., and S.W. Swisher [or W.S.] of this city.
     Funeral services were held Sunday at the Baptist church in Addison, Ohio. Interment in Gravel Hill Cemetery. -- Pt. Pleasant Register

Gallia Times
January 31, 1917
Transcribed by Henny Evans


Swisher, John

     John Swisher, aged 28, enlisted from Cheshire township, in Co. B, 91st O.V.I. 9th Aug. 1862, for three years, was wounded at the battle of Winchester the 19th and died 21st September 1864. Unmarried.

[Note: The above is taken from a list of those who died in the war. He has a stone in Poplar Ridge Cemetery in Cheshire Township. Another source shows him as buried in Winchester National Cemetery, Winchester, VA.]

The Gallipolis Journal
August 24, 1865
Transcribed by Eva Swain Hughes


Swisher, Joseph N.

A Good Citizen Dead
     Joseph W. [sic] Swisher, one of Gallia's good citizens who died at Cheshire in his 76th year, May 1, left a wife Mrs. Philanda Roush (her maiden name) and two sons and three daughters and 21 grand children. His funeral was preached by Rev. W.J. Fulton and Rev. G.C. Sprouse.

[Note: He served in Co. A, 16th Ohio Volunteer Infantry and is buried in Gravel Hill Cemetery.]

Gallipolis Daily Tribune
May 8, 1912
Transcribed by Henny Evans


Swisher, William Henry

Dropped Dead
W.H. Swisher Called in an Instant to the Other World
     W.H. Swisher, a well known resident of Gallipolis, living at Island Side, dropped dead at 2:30 this afternoon. He was about 74 years of age, strong and hearty in appearance and in a conversation we had with him early in April spoke of his future on this earth as quite uncertain, although the years had treated him kindly.
     Mr. Swisher had not been well for some time owing to heart trouble, and the end came as he was sitting on a bench in front of his residence. He was the contractor who built the new ice piers at Gallipolis, and did considerable of a timber and lumber business. He prospered in business and died quite well to do.
He leaves a widow and seven children living...two sons, John and Ira, and five daughters, two living at distant points. No arrangements for the funeral have been made.

Gallipolis Daily Tribue
June 2, 1914
Transcribed by Henny Evans

Funeral Services of W.H. Swisher
     The funeral of Mr. W.H. Swisher will be conducted at his late home at 2 P.M. Thursday by Rev. J.O. Newton. Interment under the direction of Wetherholt. The following children survive Mr. W.H. Swisher, Mrs. Wm. Blaine, of Mason county, W.Va., Mr. John Swisher, Mrs. Philena Madison and Mrs. Rebecca Alexander, of this city, Mrs. M.B. Coffman and Mrs. L.C. Pritchett, of Columbus, and Ira J. Swisher, of Mason county, W.Va.

Gallipolis Daily Tribune
June 3, 1914
Transcribed by Henny Evans

W. H. Swisher Dead
     W. H. Swisher dropped dead from heart failure at his home on Island Side in Gallipolis on Tuesday afternoon, June 2, 1914, aged 74 years. He had been at work in his garden under the river bank and fell dead at the top of the bank while returning. The deceased was a well-known and highly respected citizen and is survived by his widow and seven children. No funeral arrangements have been made as yet.

[Note: from Cogar research, served in Co. D, 141st OVI]

Gallipolis Bulletin
June 4, 1914
Transcribed by Jan Rader                                                                               Top of Page


Switzer, Daniel W.

     Died, near Evergreen, in Gallia county, on the 18th day of June,1869, Daniel W. Switzer, aged about 32 years.

[Note: Co. G, 4th WVVI]

The Gallipolis Journal
June 24, 1869
Transcribed by Eva Swain Hughes


Switzer, George R.

Death of Mr. Switzer
     Mr. George R. Switzer of Little Chickamauga, whose illness had been mentioned by us died Wednesday afternoon at 4 o'clock June 30, 1909, of heart trouble complicated with other troubles.
     His funeral services will be conducted Friday at 10 a.m. at Bethel Church near his late home by Rev. John W. McCormick assisted by Rev. Mr. Morrison, minister of the M.E. Church on Gallipolis circuit, the interment following at the same place by Hayward & Son. The pall bearers selected are Messrs. James Thompson, James Walker, J.R. Safford, Garrett Yeager, L. Gaston and Jacob Miller.
     Mr. Switzer was a son of the late John and Sallie Switzer and was born in a house opposite the Gilman farm and lived on Chickamauga all his life.
     He was united in marriage with Mary E. Morton, an estimable lady and by her became the father of Mrs. Newton Jones of Green Township,; Mrs. Bert Hodge of Washington; Mrs. Ira Copeland, Mrs. Ed Culp of Springfield Township; Frank in Alabama; Penn and Harry in Tacoma, WA and Homer at home. Of his parents' there is but one survivor, Mrs. Wellington Hawkins.
     He was a gallant soldier of the 91st. O.V.I. and continued through the war and drew $30 a month-pension for his disabilities. Dr. Safford recalls that at the Battle of Lynchburg he dropped senseless and was supposed to be dead for sometime, from a cannonball passing very close to him, but never touching him.
     He lived the quiet uneventful life of the average farmer, belonged to the M.E. Church for many years, was well liked and respected. Mrs. Louise Hankins of Springfield, Ohio is visiting the family...[rest of article missing].

[Note: Death Certificate: Born July 6, 1839, died June 30, 1909...parents not listed....1850 Census George Switzer 10 living with Solomon Switzer 40, Ellen & Ellis 15, Jonus (?) 12 and Amanda 6)

Gallipolis Daily Tribune
June 30, 1909
Transcribed by F.K. Brown


Switzer, Valentine H.

Ex-Sheriff Switzer Dead
     Ex-Sheriff Switzer, died suddenly at his home about four and a half miles out the Chickamauga road Sunday morning, Nov. 1, 1908, at the age of 64 years.
     He had been in town as late as 4 o'clock Saturday, and complained of not feeling at all well, bought some medicine, which he went off without taking away, and remarked to some one that he thought he ought to have some one with him, and after he arrived at home got Mr. and Mrs. Robt. Smith, colored people living on his farm to come and stay with him. About fifteen minutes before he died Sunday morning, he began to complain of his trouble which grew worse until he died.
     Mr. Switzer resided in town while sheriff, and was well and favorably known to every one, but it was not known, generally, that he was in poor health from heart trouble, and had been for two years, hence his death came as a great surprise. His wife was in Columbus, having been up on a visit to her daughter Mabel, who has been sojourning there.
     He enlisted in the 91st O.V.I. when a mere boy of 17 and served three years, and drew a pension of $17 a month. His regiment participated in some of the greatest battles of the war under Col. Turley, those of Cedar Creek, Lynchburg and others. After the close of the war he returned to the farm of his father, the late Commissioner Valentine H. Switzer. He was an ardent Republican and was elected Sheriff in 1887, serving two terms of two years each, when he again returned to the farm. He some years ago held various minor offices in his township, was a member of the Methodist Church and Cadot Post G. A. R. under whose auspices his funeral was held.
     He is survived by his wife and two other children, Arthur P. Switzer of New York, and Charles H. of this city. He is also survived by one own brother C. J. Switzer of Washington, D. C., and two half brothers Attorney Robert M. Switzer of this city, and Benjamin M. Switzer, conductor on the K. & M. R. R.
     His funeral services were conducted at Mt. Zion church Wednesday at one o'clock by Rev. J. W. McCormick Assisted by Rev. Morrison, and the burial followed at the same place by Undertaker Hayward & Son.
     He was charitable, friendly, good natured and well liked by every one, and a wide circle of friends regret his death.

[Note: Buried in Mound Hill Cemetery; has stone]

Gallipolis Bulletin
November 6, 1908
Vol. XLI No. 30
Transcribed by Jan Rader