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Dages, John Sr.

Called Away
Death of Mr. John Dages, Sr., Friday After a Long and Distressing Sickness
Sketch of his Life
     Mr. John Dages, Sr., is dead and Gallipolis mourns the loss of one of her foremost citizens. His epitath is written in the hearts of all who knew him. He was a man of strong character and a pronounced personality and the same plain, consciencious man during the six days of the week that he was on the Sabbath. His charitable acts were never vaunted over. He gave with a cheerful heart and no one save the needy ones heard from his lips what he did. He christian life was exemplified in all his transactions and was unfailing in asserting itself for that which was good and uplifting. Our townspeople knew this steady, unswerving gentleman and their opinion of him is the best tribute that could be paid his memory. He was a jovial, companionable and true. He was a staunch friend, devoted to his family and a good man.
     John Dages, Sr., born in New Prussia, Germany, Jan. 10th 1825, died Friay morning at 8 o'clock, aged 73 years. He was the son of Jacob and Barbara (Schur) Dages and with his parents and ten other children emigrated to America in 1834, settling in Stark county, O., on a farm, where the mother died in '68 aged seventy five, and the father in '76 at the age of eighty three. The principal reason of their coming to America was to save the large family of boys from enforced service in the German army. Mr. Dages was the sixth son and was but nine years of age when he landed in America.
     He attended school after reaching Ohio, and obtained a limited education. Until he was seventeen years of age he worked on a farm and later went to Canton where he learned the shoe maker trade. Subsequent he went to Portsmouth and worked at the trade and as a tanner. In '47 he settled here and has since made Gallipolis his home. At first he worked for his brother as a tanner. And they opened up a shoe stop.
     He began on a small scale but with time he expanded the scope of his business and it developed into one of the largest wholesale boot and shoe stores in Southern Ohio and was styled John Dages & Co., being located in the building on Court street Doepping now occupies. In '89 they removed their business to Columbus, and there it is known as one of the largest stores of its kind in the State. The present name of the store is Dages, Andrews & Co. Mr. Dages was married to Dorothy Humel in '53, who shortly after died. In '56 he was wed to Caroline M. Andrews, who preceded Mr. Dages in '88.
     Mr. Dages was the father of five children, viz. Miss Emma, at home; John W. Dages, of Columbus; C. T. Dages, and Mrs. Millie C. Thrall, of Muncie, Indiana; and Mrs. Nellie F. Johnston, of this city. All survive him. Success has always smiled on Mr. Dages and the store of Dages, Andrews & Co., is a monument built by his energy and industry. He was a staunch Republican and a defender of the principles of that party. In recognition of his services he was elected to fill a number of municipal offices of trust.
He served his party and people in the capacity of Cemetery Trustee for six years and was in the council a short term. His administrations were creditable and it could be said as of old, "Well done, good and faithful servant."
     He was taken sick at Magnetic Springs, where he had gone for his health about the middle of July. He was removed from there to the home of his son at Columbus, where he was tenderly cared for until August 2nd, when he was brought home much improved,
     On September 13 he was taken worse, and alternatively he has been better and worse ever since until Saturday last, when his condition became grave. His life has been ebbing away ever since, and at the hour mentioned above he closed his eyes in eternal sleep. Death was due to peritonitis.

[Note: served with the Squirrel Hunters during the Civil War]

Gallipolis Journal
Wednesday, November 30, 1898
Vol LXIV No. --
Transcribed by Sharon Hobart                                                                       Top of Page


Dailey, Vincent

Death at Patriot
     Vincent Dailey of Patriot died Tuesday night and was taken to his son Filmore Dailey's where he was buried today. He was a well known resident, being in his eightieth year. He has been ill for a long time.

[Note: He served in Co. D, 91st Ohio Volunteer Infantry. He is buried in Good Hope Cemetery in Guyan Township, December 11, 1832-February 26, 1918.]

Gallipolis Daily Tribune
February 28, 1918
Transcribed by Henny Evans


Dale, Clay

Death of Capt. Clay Dale
     In the Enquirer of Monday there appeared in the river news the following:"It is rumored that Mate Clay Dale, now at the Marine Hospital suffering from a contusion of the face, was assaulted with a club while asleep in a chair at the foot of Main street. His face is badly swollen and he is suffering intense agony.
     It was the first intimation that we had that our old Gallipolis friend was not in his usual condition, and this Tuesday morning a telegram came to Capt. Samuel A. Dunbar, from the Marine Hospital there, announcing his death, so that he must have died last night or this morning. He was a Mason and is supposed to have means sufficient to insure all proper care of the body. Mr. Hyde Dale, of this city, his nephew, will leave this evening by the O.R.R., to look after him. At this time it is not known what disposition of the remains will be made. He was 54 years old last March, and the youngest son of the late James and Sarah
Dale, and brother of the late Capt. Jas. W. Dale, Mrs. W.W. Fisher, Mrs. Alex Gibbons and Hiram Dale, of Emporia, Kas.
     He was unmarried and went on the river during the war, and has mated on the river on many different steamboats, and many of the best of them. He was a whole-souled, good hearted man with hosts of friends. He has never been well since two or three years ago, when he suffered from a bad case of blood poisoning, from an injury to his foot, laying in the Hospital at that time eight or nine months, and has spent considerable time in the Hospital since that time.

[Note: A few days later it was reported that there had been no foul play.]

Gallipolis Daily Tribune
August 13, 1895
Transcribed by Henny Evans


Dale, James W.

     The following memorial of Capt. Dale was adopted by Blessing Post G. A. R. at their meeting on last Monday night, and a copy was ordered to be given to his family and to be furnished to our city papers;
Comrade James W. Dale of the 4th Regt. W. Va. Vol. Infantry, has gone to join the Grand Army of the Union on the eternal camping ground. In the strength and vigor of his early manhood, he consecrated his strong body and robust health to the service of his country. He followed the fortunes of his gallant regiment until the first terrible assault upon Vicksburg, where he fell badly wounded and, left upon the field, was taken a prisoner. He rejoined his regiment before his health was fully restored and served with it faithfully until it was mustered out of service.
     He never recovered from his wound, but his cheerful face gave no sign of the hidden pain in his breast. His long and terrible suffering, patiently borne, gradually sapped the strong man's strength and brought his nearer and nearer to the border land.
     His noble life is ended here, but the story of his youthful devotion to his country is just begun-that story will be told in song and, gathered up with thousands like it, will form the priceless heritage of a free people, telling them the cost of liberty.
     Comrade Dale lived long enough to write his name high on the Roll of his Country's Defenders. As his comrades and brother soldiers, we bow with submissive heads to the divine Command that has summoned him up higher.
     We mourn our loss and sympathize with the bereft widow and children in their affliction, but we rejoice that he proved himself a true soldier in the hour of his country's danger; we rejoice that he was a friend to every worthy comrade whose tale of distress found a listening ear and an open hand in our brother, and that his love for man was broad as the race.
     We will his his genial presence, his quick sympathy, his warm, sunny nature that beamed in his kindly eye and lighted up his generous face.
     We shall miss thee, comrade, until the long roll shall beat, when time has ended and the grand Army of the Union shall again be gathered from their resting places and form the line of battle under the great...column cut off.

Gallipolis Journal
Thursday, November 20, 1884
Transcribed by Margaret Calvin                                                                      Top of Page


Dalrimple, Lorenzo D.

Died, in Addison township, on Tuesday morning, March 24th, of consumption, Mr. Lorenzo D. Dalrimple, aged 24 years and 8 months.

[Note: The spelling is Dalrymple on his tombstone. Sergeant in Company E, 56th OVI.]

The Gallipolis Journal
April 2nd, 1868
Transcribed by Eva Swain Hughes


Damron, John G.

Captain Damron Dead
Passed Away Suddenly from Heart Failure Thursday Night
     Captain John G. Damron, aged 70, died suddenly Thursday night, December 15, 1921, from heart failure at the home of his sister Mrs. John C. Oliver on Third Avenue. Captain Damron was born in Virginia. He was a son of the late Squire Damron. Captain Damron had been ill with pneumonia since returning from Columbus a week ago where he had visited his son Mr. Carson Damron and family.
     Captain Damron was a veteran steamboat engineer of 25 years back and was appointed a Federal Marine Boiler Inspector for the Gallipolis district by the late President Harrison. The late Captain Ira B. Huntington was appointed Hull Inspector at the same time. Captain Damron and Huntington both Republicans, served until a change of administration occurred when the late Captains Maddy and Morgan were appointed their successors. He also served several years as a member of the City Council of Gallipolis.
     Captain Damron was born in Point Pleasant, West Virginia, and was a son of the late Squire Damron.
Mr. Damron was a member of the official board of the Methodist Church, of the Odd Fellows, Junior Order of American Mechanics and the Grand Army of the Republic.
     While definite funeral arrangements have not been announced, it is believed the funeral will be at the M. E. Church conducted by Rev. Morrell. Burial will take place at Mound Hill under the direction of Hayward.

[Note: Previously typed transcription (author unknown) found in the Simmerman files, Damron file, Bossard Library. His date of birth on the death certificate is 1851 only, date of death is December 16th, father’s name John G. Damron and mother’s name Louise Ward. The dates on his stone at Mound Hill are June 23, 1849-December 19, 1921.]

Gallipolis Daily Tribune
Volume XXVII
Number 254
December 16, 1921
Sent by Lynn Anders


Daniel, Christopher Columbus

Death of Mr. Daniel
     Mr. C. C. Daniel, residing at Mattie, Guyan Township, died last Sunday morning, from paralysis. He was 77 years, 9 months, and 4 days old. Burial was in the Dickey burial grounds Tuesday afternoon. He leaves a wife and nine children. The deceased was in the civil war, being a member of the 173d O.V.I. No funeral services were conducted but will be the first Sunday in November by Rev. Ira Sheets and Rev. N. B. Burnett at Siloam Church.

[Note: He is listed as C.C. Daniels on the cemetery database and in the Civil War Soldiers and Sailors System. All other records show that he was 67, not 77, years old.

Gallipolis Bulletin
October 3, 1902
Vol XXXV
Transcribed by Sharon Hobart


Daniels, Madison

Death of Mr. Daniels
     Madison Daniels, of Porter, an old soldier, died Wednesday morning. He was a man well thought of and had many friends.

[Note: He was in Co. I, 173rd Ohio volunteer Infantry and is buried in Fairview/Long Cemetery in Springfield Township, 1838-1913.]

Gallipolis Daily Tribune
July 17, 1913
Transcribed by Henny Evans                                                                           Top of Page


Daniels, Silas

Suicide
     Mr. Silas Daniels, a well known citizen of this county, and who lived near Porter, committed suicide last Sunday night. During the morning of that day he attended church with his wife and selected a lot in the Clark graveyard, saying at the time that he did not expect to live long and wanted to be buried in the lot. He had been mentally unsound for some time, and about a year ago was an inmate of the Atheus Hospital. He retired to bed early Sunday evening, and his wife, who slept in another room, heard him up during the night. In the morning he could not be found about the house and in searching for him his dead body was found in a small outhouse, which he used for the purpose of fixing his bee hives. He had shot himself through the head, back of the ear, the bullet passing clear through. A widow and four children -- James S. Daniels, of near Porter, Mrs. Minx, of Bidwell, Mrs. Blake, of Columbus, and Mrs. Shaffer (widow of the late David R. Shaffer), of Addition, survive him and have the sympathy of the community in their loss.

[Notes: Cemetery: Clark Chapel, Morgan Towp. B. Nov 20, 1829, D. Sept. 24, 1894
Unit Co. D 179th OVI]

Gallia Times
Sep 1894
Transcribed by Sharon Hobart

Daniels, Silas

     SUICIDE - Mr. Silas Daniels, a well known citizen of this county, and who lived near Porter, committed suicide last Sunday night. During the morning of that day he attended church with his wife and selected a lot in the Clark graveyard, saying at the time that he did not expect to live long and wanted to be buried in the lot. He had been mentally unsound for some time, and about a year ago, was an inmate of the Athens Hospital.
     He retired to bed early Sunday evening, and his wife, who slept in another room, heard him up during the night. In the morning he could not be found about the house and in searching for him his dead body was found in a small outhouse which he used for the purpose of fixing his bee hives. He had shot himself through the head, back of the ear, the bullet passing clear through.
     A widow and four children, James S. Daniels, of near Porter, Mrs. Mink, of Bidwell, Mrs. Blake, of Columbus, and Mrs. Shaffer (widow of the late David R. Shaffer), of Addison, survive him, and have the sympathy of the community in their loss.

The Gallipolis Bulletin
Saturday, September 29, 1894
Transcribed by Sandy Lee Milliron


Daniels, Silas

By His Own Hand
Silas Daniels of Springfield Township Ends His Life - A Murderous Revolver The Weapon Used
     Mr. Silas Daniels, a respected citizen of this county, living within a mile or so of Porter, committed suicide sometime Sunday night the exact hour our informant did not know.
     He retired to bed early with the rest of the family Sunday evening and his wife and the young woman living with them both heard him up as they supposed about 10 o’clock. As it was his custom to be up and about in the night, they gave it no attention, but this morning he was missed from his room, and search being instituted, he was found down in his shop where he attended to the fixing of his bee-hives stone dead and in a large pool of blood from a wound made through the head back of his ears the ball, which was from a Colt’s navy revolver, passing clear through.
     Mr. Daniels had been mentally unsound for sometime and a year ago was adjudged insane and sent to the Asylum at Athens, but Mrs. Daniels brought him away again in a short time, but he had not recovered and while not violent or very troublesome, he showed that he was not altogether right.
     They were about to sell out where they were and move down to Porter, and this seems to have agitated him unduly, but not the slightest thought that he would destroy himself had occurred to anybody.
     He was about fifty-five years of age and besides a widow, leaves three daughters, Mrs. Mink, of Bidwell, Mrs. Blake, of Columbus, and a widowed daughter, Mrs. Shaffer, of Addison, and one son John S. Daniels, living near Porter - all highly respected people as was the deceased whose sad death will be greatly regretted by all.

The Gallipolis Journal
September 25, 1894
Transcribed by Sandy L. Milliron                                                                     Top of Page


Danley, Hiel M.

H. M. Danley of Racine Dead
     H. M. Danley is dead.  He had lived for many years at Racine, where during the most of the time he conducted a drug store.  He was born in Palmer Township, this County, was at the time of his death 69 years and six months old.  He enlisted in the Civil War in the 125th Ohio and served during the war, not even returning home in that time. He was wounded in one of the engagements and has been a constant sufferer ever since. Mr. Danley was in the engagement of Lookout Mountain and Franklin and was with the "Opdyke Tigers."  The funeral will be Saturday at the Bing burial ground, near Cheshire, Ohio, in Meigs County.

[Note: Tombstone is found in Gravel Hill Cemetery.]

Gallipolis Daily Tribune
Volume XVI
Number 141
June 10, 1910
Gallipolis, Ohio
Transcribed by: Michael L. Trowbridge


Danner, Bartholomew

B.A. Danner Dead
     Bartholomew A. Danner, a civil war veteran, died Saturday evening at his home in Walnut township, almost 79 years of age. The funeral was Monday at Lincoln Chapel. He is survived by his wife, and the following children, Joseph, Mrs. Noah Houck, John E. and Jacob F. of Gallipolis, James A. and Mrs. Frank Martt. He was a member of the Baptist Church and a fine old gentleman.

[Note: He is buried in Houck Cemetery in Harrison Township with the dates May 26, 1841 to May 8, 1920. He served in Co. D, 179th O.V.I.]

Gallia Times
May 13, 1920
Transcribed by Henny Evans                                                                          Top of Page


Darst, Elijah

     Elijah Darst died at his residence in Cheshire township, January 21st, in the 58th year of his age leaving a wife and twelve children to mourn his loss; though their loss is his eternal gain. He embraced a hope in Christ in the year 1841, and united with 1st Kyger Freewill Baptist Church, of which he remained a faithful member until death. Now he has exchanged his labor for reward. Funeral sermon by Rev. W.J. Fulton, from John, sixth, chapter 63 verse.

[Note: He is buried in Poplar Ridge Cemetery in Cheshire Township, November 27, 1817- January 21, 1876. He has a Grave Registration Card.]

Gallipolis Journal
February 10, 1876
Transcribed by Henny Evans


Darst, Samuel

     KYGER - The funeral and burial of Mr. Sam Darst was held at Poplar church and cemetery at 2 p.m. last Wednesday. Several from this vicinty attended. Only two old soldiers, members of his Post, attended the funeral. They were M.C. Boice and Alex Scott. Six young soldiers acted as pall bearers.

[Note: He served in Co.B, 91st O.V.I.]

Gallia Times
April 14, 1921
Transcribed by Henny Evans


Davidson, John

Mr. John Davidson.
     The body of Mr. John Davidson killed in an accident near Columbus, arrived here on the Hocking Valley at noon accompanied by his wife and two children, his wife's father and his wife's sister, and his son Tom. The remains were taken to Mr. Will Davidson's on Pine Street, Will having arrived at home this morning. The body was pretty badly bruised up and one leg cut off.
     The funeral services will be conducted by Rev. Mr. Maguire at the Presbyterian church Wednesday at 2 o'clock in the afternoon, the burial following at Mound Hill by Wetherholt under the direction of the Odd Fellows. He was 63 years old.
     The accident which caused his death was as follows. Mr. Davidson had visited his brother-in-law at Truro a little station 12 miles southeast of Columbus, over Sunday. Monday morning he had started for the station and was walking along the track. The W. Va. express on the Ohio Central was wrecked right where he was walking by an open switch. The supposition is that the rear end of the engine struck him killing him instantly. He was found under a part of the wreckage. The engineer was also killed, two others fatally hurt and a dozen others slightly hurt. Among those painfully bruised, but not seriously was Mr. Cam Deardorff, baggage master, and brother of Mr. E. N. Deardorff of this city and well known here.
     A telephone message from Mrs. Deardorff to Mr. Ed Deardorff his morning says Cam is skinned and bruised about the body, but not seriously.

[Note: stone shows date of death May 13, 1907 age 65y 2m 2d, (born 11 Mar 1842)]

Gallipolis Daily Tribune
May 14, 1907
Transcribed by Joanne Galvin
                                                                         Top of Page

Davidson, John

Struck by Train and Instantly Killed
     Mr. John Davidson was struck and instantly killed by a K & M passenger train at Truro station, about nine miles from Columbus, Monday morning. He was walking along the track and the train ran into an open switch knowing him down and cutting off one leg. The remains were brought here Tuesday and taken to the home of his son Mr. Will Davidson. The funeral was held at the Presbyterian church, Wednesday afternoon, by Rev. Maguire under the auspices of the Odd Fellows, interment at Mound Hill by Wetherholt.
     Mr. Davidson was born in Ireland in 1842 and came to America when about 16 years of age. He was a veteran of the civil war and a prominent Odd Fellow. He was a moulder by trade and for many years was employed in the local foundries. He was an honorable industrious citizen and his death will be regretted by a legion of friends here, where he spent the greater part of his lfe.
    He is survived by a wife and six children, Will, Tom, John and Enos by his first wife and Floyd and Everett by his last wife. They will have the sympathy of every one in their great sorrow.

The Gallipolis Bulletin
Friday, May 17, 1907
Vol. XXXX No. 28
Trasncribed by Sharon Hobart


Davies, David T [Davis]

OBITUARY
     Died Feb'y 6, 1884 of dropsy of the heart, in the 65th year of his age, Mr. David T. Davis, Greenfield Tp, Gallia Co, O.
     Mr. Davis was a native of Wales, and emigrated to this country in the year 1838. In the year 1846 at Cincinnati, on the 1st day of April, he united in marriage to Miss Mariah Davis. In the year 1853 (?) he settled in Gallia county.
     Mr. Davis possessed virtues and traits worthy of admiration and limitation. One of his leading praiseworthy characteristics was his peaceable and forgiving spirit. In word and deed he inculcated the christian lesson of loving one another.
     As a neighbor he was peaceable and harmless. As a husband and parent he was notoriously kind and tender. He held the office of Township Treasurer for 9 years and School Director for 21 years, which goes to prove that he was a man highly esteemed in the community. He united with the C. M. Church in Cincinnati, in the year 1840, and until his death lived a consistent christian life.
     He died in the triumph of conquering faith, his last words being, "Every thing is all right." On the morning of Feb 8, 1884, a large concourse of people accompanied his mortal remains to Penlel Cemetery. Services were held at the church; W. R. Evans preached in the English lanuguage, and Rev. J. W. Evans in the Welsh language.
     Peace be to his ashes.

[Stone Note & research: David T. Davies, Co. C. 56th OVI & Co. C 179th OVI]

Gallipolis Journal
Thursday, April 3, 1884
Vol. XLIX No. 22
Transcribed by Sharon Hobart                                                                       Top of Page


Davis, Stephen

    DAVIS Mr. Stephen Davies was born at Pittsburg, May 1845 and died at his home in Tyn Rhos settlement, Gallia County, Ohio, February 19, 1901, aged 55 years and 9 months. He was the fourth child of the late David and Jane Davies of Thurman. His parents moved from Pittsburg to Tyn Rhos community when he was about four years old. He was a soldier of Company D, of the 179th O.V.I.
     December 16th, 1874 he married to Miss Elizabeth Rees of Tyn Rhos. To this union were born ten children, five sons and five daughters, namely, John S., David S., Evan, Tumine, Nannie, Katie, Emma, Edwin, Gladys and Lillian Belle, who is not quite four years old, all of whom are alive, with their widowed mother to mourn the loss of a kind and affectionate father and husband. He also leaves four brothers and two sisters, Jenkin of Carroll, Nebraska, Edward of Iowa, David of Bethel near Oak Hill and Timothy of Thurman, Mrs. Thomas Davies of Tyn Rhos, and Mrs. Isaac Hughes of Thurman.
     He was received a member of the church at Tyn Rhos, by the late Rev. E. Davies, in the year 1858, when he was about 13 years of age, and remained faithful unto the end, when called from this world to join the heavenly band. About two years ago when the church felt the need of having more deacons, to assist the one that they had, and to fill the places of those made vacant by recent deaths, Mr. Davies was one of the two chosen by the church to fill the places, and while he was able he did what he could for the good cause.
     On Saturday afternoon in, two years ago, when he was commencing the class meeting, he was suddenly stricken sick. He was carried to his home near by, and medical aid called, and he soon revived. But since that time he has been constantly declining in his health. He bore his hard sickness very patiently, but at the last he said the time was very long to wait for his relief.
     He was almost unequalled as a father and husband, for he was very kind and good in his family circle, and if there is danger of a father being too careful of his family, that was Davies’ danger. As a neighbor again Mr. Davies stood very high in the esteem of this many friends, for he was always ready with a waiting hand, to help wherever he was needed. In his death the community loses a good neighbor and willing friend, the church a good and faithful member and deacon, and his home a kind and loving husband and father. Mrs. Davies and all of the children have the deep sympathy of their many friends in this their dark hour of sorrow, and may they trust in the God that has promised to be the Judge of the widow and the father of the fatherless.

Standard-Journal, Jackson, Ohio
March 20, 1901
Transcribed by Donna Scurlock


Davis, Cornelius G.

Death of Cornelius G. Davis
     Cornelius G. Davis, familiarly known as Crow Davis, died Friday, at his Fourth Ave. residence and was buried Sunday, the funeral services having been held Sunday by Elder Wright at the Paint Creek Baptist Church on Third Ave. He was well known as a faithful church worker, and as an employee at the machine shops of Enos, Hill & Co. and the Enos Machine Co.
     He was colored, somewhat of a giant in physique and of most pleasing address and disposition.

[Note: Buried in Pine Street Colored Cemetery, Gallipolis Twp. B. Feb 28 1846; D. Aug 1, 1913 Unit COC 5th USCI.]

The Gallipolis Journal
August 5, 1913
Vol. 45 NO. 32
Transcribed by Sharon Hobart

[Note: A second obit states he was a watchman at Enos & Hill and was survived by children Bessielene, Minnis, Hanie, Edwin, Pricilla and Mary. He also belonged to Odd Fellows.]

Gallipolis Daily Tribune
August 2, 1913
Abstracted by Henny Evans                                                                           Top of Page


Davis, Daniel J

Taps Sound for Daniel J. Davis
Farmer Commissioner, Old Soldier and Sturdy Old Citizen is Called to His Reward
     Early Saturday morning Apr. 28, the entire community was ? at the news of the sudden death of Daniel J. Davis, who was the son of Jenkin and Elinor Davis and was born near Tyn Rhos church May 12, 1842, being 74 years, 11 mos. and 16 days of age. He was united in marriage to Elizabeth Jenkins Dec. 1, 1870. To this happy union were born eleven children, two having died in infancy. There remain to mourn the loss of a kind father and an affectionate husband, his devoted wife and the following children: Philip Davis of Washington C. H. Ohio; Mrs. Allen Wood of Patriot, Ohio; Jenkin Davis, living near Cora; Will Davis of Columbus, Ohio; Jane and May Davis of Adrian, Mich.; Mary, Rachel and Steve at home. One brother, John Davis of Thurman, survives.
     Deceased had a wide circle of friends who with his afflicted family mourn his demise. Everything was done that could be done to make his declining years pleasant and comfortable.
     When about 18 years of age, he united with the Congregational church at Tyn Rhos and continued a faithful member until the end. His whole life was devoted to public and active work. He will be missed from the church and the community in which he lived. After his marriage he always resided on a farm near Siloam church. Since which time he had been a faithful and active member for a period of forty years, being a Deacon for 14 years and a faithful member of Siloam Sunday School, having been a teacher of the same class for many years.
     Deceased was a veteran of the Civil War belonging to 179 Regt. Co. D. He was County Commissioner from 1886 to 1892. He was deeply interested in county and state affairs and was known throughout the county in which he lived. As a neighbor he was kind and aways ready to lend a helping hand.

Dear brother thou hast left us
And our loss we deeply feel
But 'tis God that has bereft us,
Who would all our sorrows heal.

Peaceful be thy silent slumbers
Though we miss thee here below
Thou no more will join our number
Thou no more our sorrows know.

Yet again we hope to meet thee
When the day of life has fled,
When in heaven with joy to greet thee
Where no farewell tears are shed.

     The funeral services were held at Tyn Rhos church Monday afternoon and were attended by a very large crowd of relatives and friends. Rev. David T. Davis, Rev. G. James Jones, and Rev. W. J. Fulton officiated. Each paid a beautiful tribute to the memory of the departed. Burial by Davis of Centerville in beautiful Tyn Rhos cemetery overlooking hills and vales that had been familiar to the decedent from his boyhood. The pall bearers were Auditor Arthur Miller, D. D. Griffiths, George Wood, T. C. Evans, Evan Richards and Daniel E. Rees

[Note: Buried in Mound Hill Cemetery, Gallipolis, Twp. B. May 10, 1839 D. Nov 11, 1884]

Gallipollis Journal
May 3, 1917
Vol 99 No 16 Page 1
Transcribed by Sharon Hobart                                                                       Top of Page


Davis, David D.

Resolutions of Respect
     In memory of Comrade David D. Davis. It is our sad duty to report that Comrade Davis, a late member of Company D, of the First O.V.A. during the war of the Rebellion, and who was a tried, true and faithful member of Joseph Walter Post, No. 397, Department of Ohio, G.A.R., was on March 30, 1914, called by our Great Commander to the Grand Army above.
     Wherefore, we, your committee, in testimony of his loyalty to his country, when his glorious principles of freedom were assailed; of his private character as a citizen, and as a true and loyal member of the Grand Army of the Republic, recommend that a copy of these expressions of our regard for the fallen comrade be sent to his family.

Gallia Times
April 15, 1914
Transcribed by Henny Evans


Davis, David H.

At Waterloo Last Thursday, April 7
Buried at Tyn Rhos Last Saturday
     Mr. David H. Davis of Waterloo, of whose serious illness we have made mention, died Thursday afternoon, April 6, 1910, aged 90 years, 2 months and 28 days. He is survived by his sons, Rev. T. D. Davis, of Nebraska, Bender Davis, of Perry township, and daughters Mrs. Sarah Davis of Columbus, and Mrs. Anna Huddleson of the same place; also his second wife, Margaret Evans.
     His funeral and burial was at 10 a. m., Saturday at Tyn Rhos church. He was an uncle of Mrs. Riley Tanner and Mr. Henry Davis of this city.

[Stone Note: B. Jan 9, 1820; Unit Co. H 117th OVI transferred to Co H 1st OHA]

Gallipolis Bulletin
April 15, 1910 No. 17
Transcribed by Sharon Hobart

Davis, David H.

Aged 90 Years
David H. Davis Passes to His Reward --Burial Sunday
     David H. Davis, aged 90 years, 9 months and 28 days, died Thursday afternoon at his home near Waterloo bridge in Perry Tp. He was a fine old man, a member of Siloam church, a good husband, father and citizen. He usually called on the Journal when in town and had been a reader of this paper for many, many years. He was always pleasant and affable and had numerous good friends.
     He is survived by his second wife, two sons, Rev. T. D. of Nebraska and Bender of Perry Tp., and two daughters, Mrs. Sarah Davis and Mrs. Anna Huddleson, both of Columbus, one brother, Rev. Chas. Davis of Heppner, Oregon, and three sisters, Mrs. Mary Jones, widow of D. W. Jones of Centerville, Mrs. D. D. Jones of Cora, Mrs. John R. Williams of Cowan, Indiana.
     The funeral services which were largely attended were held at Tyn Rhos at 10 o’clock Sunday, Revs. Williams and Bender officiating. Burial by Davis of Centerville.

Gallipolis Journal
Wednesday, April 13, 1910
Transcribed by Sandy L. Milliron                                                                     Top of Page


Davis, Eli

     "Buckshot" is dead. This will be an item of news to many of our readers. His name was Eli Davis. He died in Pike county, this State, last February, but the fact has never reached us until now. "Buckshot" has a history. He was a soldier, every inch of him. He served through the Mexican war, and was wounded at the battle of Buena vista with a buckshot, hence his nick-name of "Buckshot."
     In 1861 he was living in Morgan township. Although about forty-five, he volunteered in Co. B, 36th O.V.I., and followed the army until he was wounded in the head by the fragment of a shell at the battle of Antietam. After this he retired from war's alarms, living in this county until seven or eight years ago, when he
removed to Pike county. May the greenest grass grow upon him, the sweetest birds sing above, and the brightest stars look down upon his humble grave.

Found in a scrapbook
Gallipolis paper possibly 1876
Transcribed by Henny Evans


Davis, James

     Mr. James Davis, an engineer at Jacox’s Planing Mill, last Thursday, had just turned off the steam, but the momentum of the fly wheel was yet carrying it around, when he got caught between the belt and the wheel, getting the fifth and sixth rib and the shoulder blade broken, and receiving a long and severe gash on the jaw, bringing the machinery to a stand still. Had steam been on, nothing could have saved him from instant death. As it was, his injuries are very serious if not fatal. Mr. Davis was a river man, having been employed on the ferry boat, Champion and other boats for a long time, and was taken to the Marine Hospital, where he was treated by Dr. F.A. Cromley, and everything possible done for him, and it was hoped he would pull through, though his age (65 years) is against his recovery.

     Since writing the above we regret to announce that Mr. Davis died at about 4 o’clock Saturday afternoon. He leaves a wife and sister. His funeral services were conducted by Rev. C.A. McManis from the Baptist church. He was buried under the auspices of the G.A.R., in the old cemetery, and his record is that of a good Christian citizen, with many friends.

[Note: He served in Co. G, 116th Ohio Volunteer Infantry.]

Gallipolis Journal
July 15, 1891
Transcibed by Henny Evans                                                                          Top of Page


Davis, James Curtis (Kirk)

Struck by Train
     Kirk Davis, an old soldier of Glen Summit, was struck by the Hocking Valley train this noon at Vinton, and fatally injured.

[Note: He is buried in Mt. Olive Cemetery in Springfield Township. He served in Co. K, 60th Ohio Volunteer Infantry.]

Gallipolis Daily Tribune
August 26, 1916
Transcribed by Henny Evans

Davis, Curtis

Civil War Veteran Killed While Walking Across Vinton Trestle
     (Vinton Cor.) Saturday morning, Aug. 26, 1916, as the local freight train pulled into Vinton our peaceful little hamlet was wrought up tp a high pitch excitement when Mr. Curtis Davis, an aged, well known and highly respected man, and a resident of Glenn, was struck and thrown from the Vinton trestle. He was so seriously injured that he died about 1:30 o'clock the same day.
     After being thrown from the trestle by the train, Mr. Davis was picked up had hastily carried to Dr. Strausbaugh's office where everything that could be done to relieve his sufferings were done.
     Immediately after the accident his wife and family were summoned and hastily reached his side. He was taken to his home on the south bound passenger train, where he shortly after passed away.
     Mr. Davis was an old solider, a member of Company K, 60th O.V.I., and had come to Vinton to attend a meeting of the G.A.R. Post. For many years it had been his custom to cross the railroad bridge at Vinton.
     Mr. Davis was aged 79 years, 4 months and 8 days. He is survived by his wife and several grown children. The funeral services were held Tuesday, interment following at Mt. Olive near Glenn Summit.

The Gallipolis Bulletin
Thursday, 31 August 1916
Submitted by Sandra Maskew


Davis, John

Death of Mr. Davis
     Mr. John Davis, the Patriot blacksmith, died Wednesday, June 24, 1908, aged about 76 years. He had been a resident of Patriot for perhaps 50 years and was an honorable fine man.
     His funeral was at Patriot Friday afternoon, by Rev. Mr. Queen of the M.E. Church. He left a wife and four daughters, Mrs. John Scott of Huntington, Mrs. J.L McDaniel, Mrs. Harry Southard of Oregon and Miss Mary, single and at home. He had been in feeble health for over a year and while his death was not unexpected, it was greatly regretted.

[Note: He was buried in Patriot Cemetery in Perry Township, 1832-1908. He served in the 167th Ohio Volunteer Infantry.]

Gallipolis Daily Tribune
June 26, 1908
Transcribed by Henny Evans


Davis, John C.

Buried at Bidwell
     John C. Davis, 79, a resident of Berlin in Jackson County, died recently at his home following a stroke of paralysis. He was born in Gallia County, was a teamster during the civil war, and is survived by five sons and one daughter. The funeral was held on Monday of last week at the church in Bidwell, interment in Fairview cemetery.

[Note: He served in Co. G, 1st Ohio Heavy Artillery.]

Gallia Times
April 28, 1921
Transcribed by Henny Evans                                                                          Top of Page


Davis, John Merrill

Entire County Mourns Death of Loved Dr. J. M. Davis
Passed Away Thursday Evening Following Stroke of Apoplexy Night Before
Funeral Sunday in Rio Grande Community Hall Largely Attended
    [photo]                               
     IN MEMORIAM - John Merrill Davis was born near Harrisonville, Meigs County, Ohio, Nov. 16, 1846, and died at his home in Rio Grande, Nov. 11, 1920. He was the eldest child of William Davis and Samantha Chase Davis. His childhood and youth were spent on the farm. At the age of seventeen, he taught his first school. It was during this school year that his mother died, and he, as the eldest of five children , assumed many of the duties incident to the maintenance of the home. In February, 1865, he enlisted in Company E., 188th O.V.I. and received his discharge in September of the same year.
     He entered Ohio University in the Spring of 1868. He taught school to earn the expenses of his college course. For three consecutive summers he conducted a private school at Side Hill, Meigs County. During his last year at the University he was employed as tutor. He received the degree of B. A. in June, 1873. The next year he served as principal of the preparatory school connected with the University. Marked features of his university life were his connection with two strong university organizations, the Athenian Literary Society and the Delta Tau Delta Fraternity.
      In the Fall of 1874, he assumed the presidency of Ridgeville College, Ridgeville, Indiana, where he labored for four years. In addition to his work for the college, he served as pastor of the Free Baptist Church of Ridgeville. From Ridgeville, he went to Wilkesville, Ohio, as principal of the Wilkesville Academy.
In August, 1879, he began his forty years of active service at Rio Grande College, retiring in June 1919. His service as president began in 1887 and was prefaced by two years as acting president. In 1911 he asked to be relieved of his duties as president and from that time until June of 1919 he taught several classes daily. During the entire time of his connection with the college, and at the time of his death, he was a member of the Board of Trustees. For a number of years he had served as Secretary of the Board. From the University of Wooster he received the degree of Doctor of Philosophy in 1886. Ohio University conferred upon him the degree of Master of Arts in 1876, and in 1896, the degree of Doctor of Divinity.
     For sixteen years, from 1879 to 1895, he served the people of this community as pastor of Calvary Church. In the councils of the denomination, he took a prominent part. He served one term as member of the General Conference Board of Free Baptists and played a prominent part in the union of Baptists and Free Baptists. Three times he was delegate to the Inter-Church Conference.
     In matters of public moment, his interest was wide and deep. Two organizations that meant more to him with each passing year were the Sons of the American Revolution and the Grand Army of the Republic. As a member of Cadot Post, Gallipolis, he went as delegate in June of this year to the state encampment at Dennison. In September, he went as delegate to the national encampment at Indianapolis.
     The twenty baccalaureate sermons which he delivered to as many graduating classes were published under the title of the first, "Striving for Masteries." A translation from the Greek of a letter from Isocrates to Demonicus, which he made while a student at the university, has recently been published in pamphlet form.
He was married to Jane Elliott Boyd, June 22, 1876, at Athens, Ohio. To this union six children were born: Carrie Samantha, Charles Elliott, Bertha, John Boyd, Ella and William Merrill. He is survived by his wife: two sons, Boyd and Merrill; seven grandchildren; two brothers, Charles M., of Oroville, Calif., and Herschel H., of Denver, Colo., and one sister, Mrs. Grace Bussing of Valpariso, Ind.                 
                                                                                                                    Top of Page
THE FUNERAL SUNDAY
     The funeral services for the late Dr. J. M. Davis, held Sunday afternoon in Community Hall at Rio Grande were very impressive and touching. Hundreds of persons from all parts of the county, and from outside the county attended.
     The services began with a song, "Oh, Love that Will Not Let Me Go." By the choir.
     A Scripture reading by Rev. Bethel was followed with a prayer by Rev. W. E. Ewing.
     A solo, "Flee as a Bird," was rendered by Prof. S. H. Bing, following which a memorial was read by Rev. W. J. Fulton.
     In brief, but touching, addresses, Rev. C. O. Clark and Rev. P. D. Woods paid their last tribute of respect and love to the life and deeds of their neighbor and co-worker who had passed away.
After a song by the choir, "Beyond the Smiling and the Weeping." Prof. Martzoloff of Ohio University spoke eloquently and fervently concerning Dr. Davis, every word of which found approval in the hearts of his auditors.
     Comrade J. W. Hank, of Jackson, a life-long friend of Dr. Davis, sang touchingly and Rev. W. J. Fulton preached the funeral sermon. Coming direct from the heart, it was one good man's tribute to another, and it showed how deeply the ties of love and friendship had knitted these two together. The service closed with a song by the choir, "Still, still with Thee." At Mt. Calvary Cemetery the services concluded with the G. A. R. ritualistic ceremony, and a benediction by Rev. Ewing.
     The pall bearers were Otho Shires, David Wickline, W. A. Lewis, Dan Davis, Neil Berridge and Stephen Jenkins.

DR. JOHN MERRILL DAVIS (by Judge R. J. Mauck)
     His resources were limited, his opportunities were few, but he made the most of both of them. Never very rugged physically, he lived wisely and well and extended his years beyond those of the psalmist's promise. Born at a time and place that afforded scant facilities for an education, he became the most learned man of his section of a learned state. He was a patriot and exemplified his patriotism as a Union soldier, but he was no less devoted to his county in times of peace. He studied our institutions and understood them and understanding them he loved them. He was much more, however, than the great scholar and the devoted patriot. He was of profound religious conviction and builded his life upon the immovable foundation of faith in God and the revelations of His word. From him radiated a belief in love for this fellowman. The influence of his life cannot be measured or defined. He was a builder of character, and the men and women whose better qualities he helped to fashion and develop have themselves become builders, and through them and their work his life continues and will continue in enlarged and enlarging circles to fashion and develop[ better men and women, here, there and everywhere.
     His gentle, kindly manner, his recognized ability as preacher and writer, his dignified though modest demeanor, made him a distinguished figure in our community. All sorts of men knew him and revered him for his worth and his accomplishments. We shall not soon look upon his like again. He embodied what men have in mind when they speak of a Christian gentleman.

[Note: Buried in Calvary Baptist Cemetery in Raccoon Township]

The Gallia Times
Vol XXII Vol XXII
Thursday, November 18, 1920
Transcribed by Margaret Calvin and Sharon Hobart                                          Top of Page


Davis, John S.

Dies in Columbus Hospital; Jackson Sun
     Last Thursday while attending the reunion of his regiment, the 91st O.V. I. in Portsmouth, Ohio, Mr. John S. Davis of this city, was taken severely ill with kidney trouble, which necessitated his returning home. Upon his return home it was deemed advisable to remove him to a hospital and accordingly he was taken to Columbus. It was a shock to his friends and relatives when on Tuesday evening news of his death was announced.
     Mr. Davis had complained to some extent all summer but none dreamt that the end was so near.
He was a son of John S. and Margaret Davis and was born in Gallia county near the Jackson county line, 79 years ago. His early years were spent on a farm. In 1871 he was united in marriage to Miss Mary Parry. They lived for a time in Bloomfield township, later in Madison, but for the last thirty years they have resided in this city. They reared a large family of children and the following survive: John, of Frement, Ohio, Homer, Sue, Margaret and Kate of this city, Daniel of Ft. Wayne, and Mrs. Emma Baker of Rushville. It will be remembered that Thomas passed away about three years ago. The mother and one sister, Mrs. John M. Jones of Mills Station, Gallia county, together with the children, are left to mourn the loss of a kind husband, father and brother.
     Mr. Davis was a man of honor, honesty and integrity, a peaceful lawabiding citizen and his death is a matter of regret to a host of friends about town and wherever he was known.
Funeral services were conducted at the Welsh church, of which he was a devoted member, Saturday morning at 10 o'clock. Rev. Walter H. Jones will be in charge of the services. The funeral directors were Ridgeway & Thomas.

[Note: Not buried in Gallia county, Ohio]

Gallipolis Journal
October 9, 1912
Transcribed by Margaret Calvin                                                                      Top of Page


Davis, Lewis W.

Lewis Davis Dead
     Lewis W. Davis died at his home at Centreville on Tuesday, June 17, 1913, aged 79 years. His death was caused by the infirmities due to his extreme old age. The funeral was held at the Welsh M.E. Church Friday by Rev. Thomas, burial following in the Centreville cemetery. The deceased was married three times, his last wife, Mary Evans Davis, and one son Charles of Columbus surviving him. He was a spendid man and his friends will hear of his death with regret.

[Note: He served in Co.B, 138th Ohio Volunteer Infantry and is buried at Hill Cemetery in Jackson County just over the Gallia County line. July 17, 1834-June 17, 1913.]

Gallipolis Bulletin
June 26, 1913
Transcribed by Henny Evans


Davis, Rufus W.

     Rufus W. Davis was born in November 1839. He worked for a farmer as a young man and
enlisted as a Corporal in 1862 in 18th Battery, Ohio Light Artillery. He was sick during his service but served
until the end of the war.
     In 1866 he married Sarah Matthews and they moved to Columbus in 1880 where he drove a
team hauling a grocery cart. On his death certificate he was listed as a steamboat man. He eventually went to
the Soldiers' Home in Erie County, Ohio and died there July 13, 1911. He was the father of 7 children. He is
buried in Greenlawn Cemetery in Columbus, Franklin County, Ohio.

Created obit from Nancy Hank Ewing research and service records
July 1911
Created by Henny Evans


Davis, Thomas H.

Death of a Good Man
     Mr. Thomas H. Davis, of Patriot, died Thursday morning at 11 o'clock Sept. 12, 1901, after an illness of a little over a week, worn out with the infirmities of old age.
     His funeral service will be conducted at Tyn Rhos Church, in Raccoon tp., near Rio Grande, Saturday morning at 10 o'clock by Rev. E. H. Gelvin, of this city, and Rev. Mason, of Centerville, two discourses, Welsh and English. The interment will follow at the same place conducted by Undertakers Thomas & Davis of Centerville.
     Mr. Davis was born in Wales 80 years ago next January, and came to this country just after his marriage. They settled near where he was laid to rest, and he joined that church soon after coming. They reared a family of children as follows: Mrs. David Rees, Thomas Davis of Patriot; Mrs. David N. Jones of Mud Creek; Mrs. John B. Wood of Peniel; Mrs. Riley Tanner of Gallipolis; Mr. David Davis of Wilkesville; with three dead- one in infancy and Miss Ann Davis and the late Henry Davis. He died at the home of his daughter, Mrs. Rees, with whom he had lived since the death of his wife eighteen months ago.
     After he and wife came to this country he was followed by his father and stepmother, both of whom are deceased, and is survived by brothers and sisters as follows: David H. Davis and John H. Davis of Cora, Mrs. Dan Jones of Centerville, Rev. Charles Davis of Columbus, Dan Davis of Maple Shade, Mrs. David Williams of near Buffalo. He has a brother and sister dead, Richard and Elizabeth, the latter the mother of Mr. Henry Davis of this city.
     He was at the time of his death and for 60 years before a member of Siloam Church, a Congregationalist Church. He was a devoted Christian man and a prominent leader in the church for forty to fifty years, and was held in high esteem by all good Christian people. He became lonely after the death of his wife and was ready and anxious for the change that called him to a better life. He was a more than an ordinarily good and respected man. He was a splendid husband, father and brother and a citizen of wide and good reputation and laid down a blameless life.

[Note: From gravemarker date of birth February 11, 1822.]

Gallipolis Daily Tribune
September 13, 1901
Transcribed by Lynn Anders                                                                          Top of Page


Davis, Thos. E.

Death of Thos. E. Davis
     Thos. E. Davis was born at or near Abrrestwyth Cardiganshire, Wales, July 3, 1843., and died near Rio Grande, Ohio, February 12, 1911, aged 67 years, 7 mos. and 9 days.
     He was married January 21st, 1895 to Mary Davis, of near Centreville, and to this union were born four sons and one daughter. One son, David Davis died in 1878 and one daughter Jennie Davis died Aug. 1904. There remains to mourn his loss a wife, three sons, one grand-daughter, two brothers, two sisters and a host of friends and relatives.
     He started with his parents for America from Liverpool, England in the vessel Tamerlene Aug. 1st, 1847 and landed in Montreal, Canada on Sept. 25th 1847. From there he was taken by way of the Ohio Canal to Chillicothe and finally his parents located at a place not far from Old Portland, Jackson County, Ohio.
     After working until he was eighteen years old on a farm he and two of his brothers went to Portsmouth offering their service to save their country. Enlisting as a private October 17, 1861, for three years and served these long years faithfully and well, before re-enlisting again he came home on a furlough but returned in a short time, re-enlisting again for the period of three years, or until the end of the war. Shortly after his re-enlistment while fighting at Champion Hills his brother was killed, the bullet passing thru the lower part of his coat sleeve and instantly killing his brother.
     He was mustered out October 4, 1865 at Camp Dennison, Ohio by order of the War Department, serving in all about four and one-half years in the great war of the rebellion.
     After the war closed he returned to the home of his father, staying only about two years. He and his brother, Rees, then went west and worked in the states of Minnesota, North and South Dakota returning to Ohio in about 1872 and he took up his work at Old Cambria Furnace until they moved near Centreville in 1888, residing on a farm there for about 8 years, thence moving on a farm near Rio Grande, where he lived till the time of his death.
     The funeral services were held Wednesday forenoon at Tyn Rhos church, conducted by Rev. W. J. Fulton and Rev. Williams. Burial by Undertaker Davis of Thurman.

Note: [Buried as T. E. Davis in Cemetery in Perry Township. B. July 3, 1843; D. Feb 12, 1911 Unit Co. G. 26th OVI]

Gallipolis Journal
February 22, 1911
Transcribed by Sharon Hobart                                                                       Top of Page


Davis, William G.

Death Comes
To End Suffering of W.G. Davis, an Old Soldier
     William G. Davis, aged 71, an old soldier, passed away at the home of his son, W. A. Davis on Island Side at 8:30 o'clock Monday morning after an illness for the past year with cancer of the spine. He was operated on last winter, and since then it was known he could not recover. He was a man of fine physique, great strength and vitality, and picturesque in appearance. He was born in this county and most of his life was spent on a farm near Bulaville.
     Fifty three years ago he was married to Sarah Ward, who died 2 years ago. To this union were born 8 children, 7 surviving, namely: Lewin G., William A., Ernest G., Lorain E (Noah), all of this city, Clinton A. of Columbus, Monroe of Gahanna, O., Mrs. Geo. Bunce of Addison Tp. Another daughter Mrs. Elma Berry, died some years ago. There are three surviving sisters, Mrs. Tersie Quickle and Mrs. Mary Viars of Glenn and Mrs. Dyer of Amsden.
     Mr. Davis was a good soldier and a good citizen and his distressing illness and death occasioned much sorrow among those who had known him. He was devoted to his family and that devotion was repaid in fullest measure. He was a member of the Christian Church.
     There was a brief service at the W. A. Davis home at 7"45 Wednesday, after which the body was taken to Bulaville Church where services were conducted by Rev. J. O. Newton and Rev. W. E. Ewing. Burial in Rife cemetery by Wetherholt.

[Note: From tombstone: Born August 14, 1842 Died Oct 25, 1915, burial in Rife Cemetery Addison Township, Gallia County, Ohio]

Gallipolis Journal
October 28, 1915
Transcribed by Margaret Calvin


Davis/Davies, William J.

Veteran Gone

     William J. Davis died at his home near Centerville, Wednesday of last week. He was about 70 years of age and a member of the 91st regiment. The funeral services were held at Tyn Rhos Friday afternoon, by Rev. Williams, assisted by Rev. Evans of Jackson, burial by Davis & Thomas. Deceased was a son of Jenkin W. Davis and his wife was the daughter of Rev. Davis, formerly of Tyn Rhos.
     He is survived by the following children, his wife having preceded him several years ago: Mrs. David Jones, of Centerville; Mrs. J.E. Rees, of Gage; Jenkin and Evan of Van Wert county; Dan, Ella and Amy May at home. He is also survived by two brothers, Ex-Commissioner Dan J. Davis, of Cora, and J.J.W. Davis, of Centerville. He was highly respected by all who knew him and his death is a source of regret to many friends.

[Note: He was in Co. B. His name is spelled William J. Davies on his cemetery stone.]

Gallipolis Bulletin
July 30, 1909
Transcribed by Henny Evans                                                                        Top of Page


Davis, William W.

     W. W. Davis of Madison Township Passed Away May 1st Wm. W. Davis died at his home in Madison township, near Thurman, Wednesday, May 1st after an illness of several weeks. He was a son of David and Mary Davis and was born in Cardiganshire, South Wales October 5, 1824, emigrated with his parents to this county when about nine years of age and settled in Gallia county. When he grew to manhood, he was married and purchased the farm on which he had lived for fifty years.
     On August 15, 1864, he enlisted in Co. D 179th O.V.I. and served until the end of the war. His record as a soldier was without blemish.He was a peaceable citizen and would go out of his way to do one a favor. He had characteristics different from the ordinary run of citizens, but was consistent in his beliefs. The funeral services were conducted at the home Friday afternoon, interment being made at High-hill cemetery by Undertaker Davis.

Standard-Journal, Jackson, Ohio
May 15, 1912
Transcribed by Donna Scurlock


Davisson, Jesse

     DIED - At 5 o'clock Tuesday morning, Jan. 5, 1897, Jesse R. Davisson of Cadmus, O., of rheumatic
arthritis and rheumatic endocarditis. Mr. Davisson was born Dec. 11, 1840. He was married to Miss Jane N. McDaniel Oct. 24, 1872, whom he leaves with two sons to mourn his demise. Mr. Davisson leaves an aged mother, four brothers and two sisters, residing in Kentucky, his former home. The deplorable removal of a life so full of activity is a sad and unexpected surprise, leaving a vacancy and a shadow that will be deeply felt by all his friends and will prove a serious loss to the community and public. His cheerfulness, which did not desert him on his dying bed, will be missed by us in future social gatherings. But he has left us the memory and example. Mr. Davisson professed a hope in Christ and united with the Sand Fork Baptist church in 1871,
remaining a member until death.
     Deceased served his country in Company K, 10th Regiment, Kentucky Volunteer Cavalry. Funeral services conducted by Rev. D.S. Jones, of Centerville and others. Mr. Davisson was an indulgent father, a devoted husband. Sympathy is extended the afflicted family. May they so live that God will verify his promise to the widow and fatherless. A Friend

[Note: He is buried in Sandfork Cemetery in Walnut Township.]

Transcribed by Henny Evans
Gallipolis Journal
January 19, 1897


Dawson, Martin

Dawson, Mart

War Veteran Dead
Mart Dawson, Aged Citizen of First Ward Passed Away
     Mr. Mart Dawson, a fine old citizen and soldier of the war, died of heart trouble at 1:30 p.m. today, Monday, August 11, 1913. His funeral services will be conducted at his late home down on 3d avenue near Stevers’ livery, it is thought now, Wednesday forenoon, though the exact time cannot be given until a brother and two or three daughters are heard from, who reside in Ironton.
     Rev. John Porter will conduct the funeral services and Undertaker Stevers the burial at Mercerville. He was raised in or near Mercerville. He belonged to the 33d O. V. I. in the war for the Union and was one of the brave boys in blue who upheld the starry banner during that eventful time.
     He was a pensioner and received $35 a month for the disabilities incurred at that time. His aged help-meet will have the sympathy of many friends in her sorrow.

Gallipolis Daily Tribune
Monday, August 11, 1913
Transcribed by Sandy L. Milliron

Martin Dawson Dead
     Martin Dawson died at his home on lower Third avenue Monday afternoon, August 11, 1913. The funeral was conducted Wednesday morning at the residence by Rev. John Porter, burial following at Mercerville by undertaker Stevers. The deceased was a fine old man and a veteran of the civil war, having been a member of the 33rd Regt. O. V. I. He leaves a wife and several children to mourn the loss of a devoted and loving husband and father.

The Gallipolis Bulletin
August 14, 1913

Obituary
     Martin L. Dawson was born on December 4, 1838, died August 11, 1913, being 75 years, 8 months and 7 days old. He was the son of James and Caroline Page Dawson, was born in Gallia Co., served in the Civil War, being in Company F. 33rd O. V. I. He leaves a wife, one daughter, two stepdaughters, a stepson and two brothers, also many friends. Some years ago he united with the Baptist Church and was baptized.

The Gallipolis Journal
August 15, 1913
Vol. 95 No. 33
Transcriptions by Sharon Hobart                                                                  Top of Page


Day, Alfred

IN THE OLD HOUSE
Where His Life Was Happily Spent Captain Al Day Dies
     The spirit of Capt. Alfred Day, of Cheshire, winged its flight to the eternal reward Thursday morning, December 8th at 10 o'clock. He laid down life's burden surrounded by those whose unwearied hand did much to relieve him during his suffering and thus a life of probity and worth ended.
     Deceased was 62 years of age and born in Washington County, Ohio. He followed his chosen avocation--that of a steamboatman--until his advanced age rendered him unfit for the responsibilites of a pilot or captain. He carried both master and pilot license and in his prime he was one of the most acceptable rivermen and always had a good berth. Among the last boats he run on was the A.L. Norton. He was on a good many boats and it would be impossible to attempt to give an accurate list. His steamboating was chiefly between Gallipolis and Marietta and at every port intervening his name was a familiar one.
     He has been sick with Bright's disease for three months and that was the immediate cause of his death.
His widow was Miss Marie L. Anderson, daughter of the late Mrs. Lucy Anderson. Mrs. Day, with two children, Mrs. H.W. Resener and Mrs. L.W. Swanson and a host of friends mourn his death.

Gallipolis Journal
Wednesday, Dec. 14, 1898 [vol. LXIV, No. 4]
Transcribed by F.K. Brown and Sharon Hobart


Day, James Gideon

     James G. Day died April 20. After a lingering sickness, he was called from earth to live with the loved ones gone before. His loving and faithful wife and children watched over him with the tenderest love. Kind physicians did all they could do. Alas! he had to go the Great Physician, who came and eased all his pains. Weep no more, dear family.
     Remember those kind words he last spoke to you, entreating you all to meet him in heaven. These words should be lamps to guide you. To the father and brothers and sisters, let me remind you, always try to live as he wished you all to live; look up; trust in the Saviour as he trusted in Him; live right; try to make the last days of your lives as bright as his. We all have to give up our loved ones; but when they leave the bright assurance of the hopes of heaven that friend Gid left behind him, we should only think that they were dead but now they live. He suffered many long years. The Divine prsence that sustained him through life did not leave him. His expressions of faith were most assuring. Near the close of his life, when the veil of the future seemed drawn aside, he would exclaim" "O, what pretty sights I have seen; such bright sunshine. Why do I stay here?" To his dear friends his death should be more joy than sorrow, at the truimph of his faith in God and the hopes he had in the eternity beyond. Weep no more, dear family, only think he has fallen asleep in Jesus, in hope of the resurrection. L.A.W., Mercerville

[Note: He served in Company F, 23rd Ohio Volunteer Infantry and is buried in Providence Cemetery in Clay Township.]

Gallipolis Bulletin
May 12, 1891
Transcribed by Henny Evans                                                                          Top of Page


Daywalt, Mark

Civil War Veteran Dies of Heart Trouble at 88
     Funeral services were held Monday at 1:30 p.m. for the late Mark Daywalt, a veteran of the Civil War, who died at his home in Maple Shade Saturday noon. The services were conducted by Rev. Brady of Huntington and burial followed in Pine Street Cemetery by Wetherholt & Entsminger. The aged veteran is survived by his widow and two sons, one living in Indiana, and other, Charlie, at home.

[Note: He served in Co. G, 18th O.V.I.]

Gallipolis Daily Tribune
February 16,1926
Transcribed by Henny Evans


Deckard, Enoch

Taps Sound for Old Civil War Veteran
Enoch Deckard, Pioneer of Gallia County, Dies at Bidwell
     Enos [sic] Deckard, father of Ira Z. Deckard of Wellston, died at his home at Bidwell Monday at half past one. Mr. Deckard was 91 years old and his death was due chiefly to the infirmities of his advanced age. He was one of the oldest citizens in Gallia county, living first between Vinton and Centerville in the Brush settlement and later at Bidwell. A veteran of the Civil war, he had marched with Sherman to the sea, and had fought in many of the hardest battles of the great struggle. He was a member of the G.A.R.
     Seven children are bereaved by the death of their father, their mother having preceded him five years ago. The children are Ira Z. of Wellston, Harrison C. of Chicago, Alonzo L. of Evansville, Ind., Albert N. of Columbus, Mrs. Nancy J. Glenn of Bicknell, Ind., Mrs. Alice Hickerson of Rio Grande, and Mrs. Betty Egan who was at her father's home. The funeral services will be Thursday at 1:30 at the home, conducted by Rev. Wm. Fulton of Vinton. Wellston Telegram

Gallia Times
November 30, 1922
Transcribed by Henny Evans

     Enoch Russell Deckard, son of George W. and Elizabeth Deckard, was born on a farm in Gallia county, Ohio, Jan. 17, 1832, and departed this life Nov. 20, 1922, aged 90 years, 11 months and 17 days. He was united in marriage with Kathryn Allen June 18, 1853, and to this union were born ten children, seven of whom are living. The are H.C. Deckard of Chicago, Ill., A.L. Deckard, Evansville, Ind., I.Z. Deckard, Wellston, A.N. Deckard, columbus, Mrs. Nan Glenn, Bicknell, Ind., Mrs. Alice Hickerson, Rio Grande, and Mrs. Bettie Egan, Bidwell.
     Two sons and a daughter have passed ahead to the unknown land. The
eldest son departed this life in infancy, and George W. and Myra Kelly grew to womanhood and manhood before being called by their Master. He also leaves 31 grandchildren, 18 great grandchildren, and 2 great
great grandchildren, two brothers and one sister, Perry Deckard of Vinton, and W.R. Deckard and Mrs. Polly Baker of Fostoria.
     At the age of 18 he united with the F.W.B. Church and held that faith to the end. He was a kind father and a good neighbor, and was willing to help in time of need. Living in this community so many years he will be greatly missed. He enlisted during the Civil War in Co. K, 78th regiment, and served his country faithfully.

Soldier rest! Thy warfare o'er,
Sleep the sleep that knows not breaking,
Dream of battlefields no more,
Days of danger, nights of waking,
In our isles' enchanted hall,
Hands unseen thy couch are strewing,
Fair strains of music fall,
Every sense in slumbers dewing,
Soldier, rest! Thy warfare o'er.

     Funeral services were held Nov. 23 at the family residence in Bidwell conducted by the Rev. W.J. Fulton, who delivered an impressive sermon. Music was furnished by the Methodist church choir. The floral tributes were many and beautiful. The body was laid to rest in Fairview cemetery by H.K. Butler to wait the great day when the faithful are rewarded.
     The children desire to thank the neighbors and friends who assisted in the care of their father during his illness, death and burial.

Gallia Times
December 7, 1922
Transcribed by Henny EVans                                                                          Top of Page


Deckard, Julius

Julius Deckard Dead
     Julius Deckard, formerly of Vinton, died Sunday at the home of his son, John, near the Brush Church. Another son, Rev. Walter Deckard, lives at Providence, R. I.

[Note: Stone in Brush Cemetery, Huntington Twp.; b. 1834 d. 1917; Served with the Squirrel Hunters in the Civil War]

Gallipolis Journal
July 26, 1917
Vol. 99 No. 28 P. 1
Transcribed by Sharon Hobart


Deed, William

Killed by Lightning
     William Deed, colored, aged about 75, residing near Rodney, was struck by lightning Monday morning and instantly killed. He was at work in the fields and when the storm approached started for shelter, accompanied by his grandson, who was rendered unconsious by the shock. Deed was an ex-slave, and is said to have served in the late war, and was an honest and industrious man. He was buried Tuesday.

[Note: Co. E, USCT ]

Gallipolis Bulletin
September 4, 1897
Vol XXX No. 44
Transcribed by Sharon Hobart


DeLille, Joseph

Death of Joseph DeLille
     Mr. Joseph DeLille, one of Galiia County's best known citizens, and residing in Springfield Township, died Thursday morning at four o'clock from a complication of diseases. He was in the seventy-fifth year of his age, and leaves four children, Misses Sallie and Elizabeth DeLille, at home, and Mrs. William Phillips and Mr. Andrew DeLille. Rev. J. W. McCormick will conduct the funeral services at Bethel Church Saturday afternoon at one o'clock, and Wetherholt will have charge of the burial.

[Note: Buried in Bethel Cemetery in Addison Township. B. Feb 20, 1827; D. Nov. 7 1901 Unit Co. L 7th OVC]

Gallipolis Bulletin
November 8, 1901 Vol XXYV No. 2
Transcribed by Sharon Hobart                                                                       Top of Page


Denney, Isaiah

     Mr. Isaiah Denney, an ex-soldier, died at the Infirmary last Saturday evening and was buried by the G.A.R. Post last Sunday evening.

[Note: He served in Co. I, 173rd Ohio Volunteer Infantry. 1823-July 8, 1888.]

Gallipolis Journal
July 11, 1888
Transcribed by Henny Evans


Denney, John Harvey, Rev.

     John Harvey Denney was born in September, 1843 to John and Paulina Carter Denney. He married Vernetta Ewing in 1867 in Gallia County. He was a farmer and a Baptist minister. He enlisted in Co. L, 7th Ohio Volunteer Cavalry. He served from August 1862 to June 1865. After the death of Vernetta he married Agnes Lediger and reportedly announced he did not want to be buried by either of his wives. He died in Beaver, Pike County, Ohio June 17. 1927 and was buried there in Givens Chapel Cemetery.

Created obit from Ewing family research of Nancy Hanks Ewing and other records
June 1927
Created by Henny Evans


Denney, Lew

     Mr. Lew Denney of East Gallipolis died at his home with heart trouble Saturday morning. Mr. Denny was 70 years old and was a soldier in the Civil war. He was very infirm and had been feeling badly for several days. His funeral services were held at his home Monday afternoon, Re. A. P. Cherrington officiating.

[Note:  Pine Street Cemetery 12/10/1838-2/22/1908;  Co. F 173rd OVI]

Gallipolis Bulletin
February 28, 1908
Vol. XLI No. 14
Transcribed by Sharon Hobart & also by Sandy Milliron


Denney, Obediah

     Mr. Obediah Denney died at his home in Springfield Township Thursday, March 2, 1905, aged 82 years. He died suddenly of heart disease while sitting in a rocking chair. The funeral services were conducted Sunday morning, burial following in the family grave-yard by undertaker Glassburn.
     Mr. Denney was a fine old gentleman, was well and widely known and had a host of friends who regret his demise. He leaves two sons, Rev. S. S. Denney and Rev. R. R. Denney, to mourn the loss of an excellant father.

[Note: Obediah Denney is buried in Denney Cemetery, Springfield Twp. He served as a Squirrel Hunter.]

Gallipolis Bulletin
March 10, 1905
Transcribed by Karen Strojin                                                                         Top of Page


Denney, Zachariah

     Mr. Zachariah Denney died Friday, December 26th, 1884, of paralysis, after an illness of a few weeks. Mr. Denney was born in July, 1813, in North Carolina, and came here when a babe. For a number of years he was the leading butcher of this city, but finally drifted into merchandizing, attending strictly to his business and enjoying life very much. He was a big hearted neighbor and strictly honest in his business method, and plain in the expression of his sentiments. He was the father of a large family, all grown.
     The remains were interred Sunday under the auspices of the Fire Department, the deceased having been a member of the old and original Fire Department of this city. Mr. Denney will be missed, as we miss all straight forward, good citizens.

[Note: He is buried in Pine Street Cemetery and has a Grave Registration Card for Civil War soldiers.]

Gallipolis Journal
December 31, 1884
Transcribed by Henny Evans


Derry, George Lewis

Death of George L. Derry
     Mr. George Lewis Derry, whose death August 26, '99, was briefly mentioned in Saturday's Tribune, was born and raised in Wilkesville, O., in the same house in which he lived until he came to Gallipolis, last November, with his family to make his home, and was 66 years of age at the time of his death.
     He was the son of Benjamin Derry, a tailor of Wilkesville, and was a building contractor by occupation. He was married to Miss Mary S. Curtis of this City, in 1863, and became the father of five children, a daughter and son being dead, and three, Mrs. G. J. Wetherholt and son Frank of this City, and Mrs. F. H. Mutchler, of Wellston, O., surviving.
     He was a soldier in the Civil War, belonging to the 90th O. V. I., and serving nearly through the entire war, and recieved a pension for disabilities incurred while in the service. He was a member of the Presbyterian Church, and was a Mason for 45 years, and his funeral services will be conducted by that Order.
     He had been more or less an invalid for the past five years, but managed to keep on his feet until about three weeks ago, when he was taken to his bed and passed away as stated, about 3 P. M., last
Saturday. He was one of the kindest and best tempered men in the world and was highly respected for his good judgement and kindly qualities. In his family he was all that could be desired of a husband and father.
     One brother, Mr. J. H. Derry, of Wilkesville, and one sister, Mrs. George Rowley of Leon, W. Va., survive him.
     This Monday evening, there will be a brief religious service conducted by Rev. E. H. Gelvin, at his home on Front Street. The funeral cortege will leave here in carriages early Tuesday morning, the interment following at Wilkesville, Tuesday.

Gallipolis Daily Tribune
Volume XI
Number 106
August 28, 1899

Transcribed By: MLT                                                                                          Top of Page


Detelante, George

     The relatives of George Detelente, who was drowned at our wharf, last week Tuesday, request that any information in regard to the recovery of the body be sent to Alexander Detelente, Gallipolis, Ohio; also that the body if found, be sent to the above. We give the following description of the deceased: Age, 19— from 5 1/2 to 6 ft. high—had a light mustache—wore, at the time, a soldier's blouse, home-made, black jeans pants and boots patched at the toe. Ironton and Portsmouth papers will please make mention.

[Note: Co. I, 173rd OVI. His body was never recovered.]

The Gallipolis Journal
December 13, 1866
Transcribed by Eva Swain Hughes


Dewitt, Phillip Alexander

Phillip A. Dewitt, Civil War Veteran, Dies
Funeral Services Thursday at Mt. Carmel Church
     Phillip A. Dewitt died Tuesday at the age of eighty four. Mr. Dewitt was one of the few remaining Civil
War veterans in the city, he, having seen service as a private in Co. B, 193rd O.V.I. He had lived all his life
near Mt. Carmel, this county, until about twenty years ago, when he moved to 1204 Second avenue where he had since resided.
     He is survived by his wife, Mrs. Mary Robinson Dewitt and five children, E.G. Cirtsville, W.Va., G.W.
Clarksburg , W.Va. Mrs. George Harmon, Rutland, Mrs. C.E. Price and Oden Dewitt, of this city. Funeral services will be held Thursday at 1:30 p.m at Mt. Carmel by Rev. Frost. Interment in the cemtery there under direction of George J. Wetherholt and Sons.

Gallipolis Daily Tribune
June 26, 1929
Transcribed by Henny Evans


Dickey, Leroy

Death of Mr. Leroy Dickey
     Mr. Leroy Dickey died at his home on Lincoln Ridge Wednesday, July 8, 1925 after a long illness.
     He leaves his widow and four sons and one daughter, Homer, Oscar, Leo and Ellsworth and Nellie Dickey. Funeral services will be held Friday at the Dickey Church at 10 A. M.

Gallipolis Daily Tribune
Volume XXXI
Number 161
July 9, 1925
Gallipolis, Ohio

[Note: Co. G, 1st Ohio HA]

Transcribed By: MLT


Dickey, Leroy

     Leroy Dickey, son of Richard and Rebecca Criss Dickey, was born November 15, 1839, in Brush Creek Township, Jefferson County, Ohio, died at his home in Harrison Township, Gallia County, July 8, 1925, aged 85 years 2 months and 23 days. He came to Gallia County in 1850 with his parents, four brothers and five sisters, namely: Titus, Silas, Alva, Elza, Mary, Eliza, Ann, Ellnor J. and Isabel, the only surviving member of this large family being Elza, the youngest of the family, and who had made his home with his brother and helped to care for him in his last illness.
     He was a soldier of the Civil War, enlisting in 1862 as a member of co."G" 1st Ohio Volunteer Heavy artillery, and served until the close of the war, receiving an honorable discharge at Nashville, Tennessee. He was a charter member of John Leaper Post, G.A.R. and was a faithful member of said Post until same was disbanded in 1923.
     In 1867 he was united in marriage to Pheribia Robinson, who departed this life in the year 1884, and to this union were born the following children: Bertha, who died in 1886, Oscar of Gallipolis, Leo of Mercerville, Ellsworth of Lincoln, and Homer and Mrs. Nellie Tope of Columbus, Ohio.
     In the year 1898 Mr. Dickey was again married to Margaret A. Houck, widow of Charles Houck, who cared for him and shared his pleasures and sorrows in his declining years, and who with five children, four stepchildren, ten grandchildren and numerous relatives and friends are left to mourn their loss. Uncle Roy, as he was called by every one was held in the highest esteem of all and his death marks the passing of one of our oldest and most honored citizens.

Gallia Times
July 23, 1925
Transcribed by Henny Evans                                                                              Top of Page


Dickey, Matthew Riley

Squire Dickey   
Died at Home at Clipper Mill Thursday
     M. R. Dickey of Clipper Mill, died Thursday Sept. 16, 1908, after a painful illness, of congestion of the liver. He would have been 87 years old next March. Though he has been able to get around he had been in poor health for some time.
     Mr. Dickey was born in Pennsylvania and came to this county with his parents when but a lad. He was married three times and became the father of fourteen children, of whom the following and his third wife survive: Mrs. G. W. Clark and Mrs. John Van Hamm of Gallipolis, Ira Dickey of Huntington, Frank of Rockwood, O., Silas, of Cox's Landing, Mrs. Bert Irion and Mrs. Laura Wetherholt of Mercerville, Mrs. Hattie Irwin of Columbus, and Miss Elma at home.
     He was an honorable, highly respected citizen, a member of the Methodist church, and a kind and indulgent father and husband. He served several terms as Justice of the Peace and stood high in the community and a host of friends will be sorry to know of his death.
     The funeral services were held at Ohio Chapel at 10 o'clock Saturday, Rev. Frank Richards officiating. Interment at Mina Chapel Cemetery by Wetherholt.

Gallipolis newspaper
Sept. 1908
Transcribed by Joanne Galvin


Dickey, Matthew Riley

From the obituary read at the funeral the following is taken:

     Matthew Riley Dickey was born on the 22nd day of March, 1822 and at his death was 86 years, 5 months and 26 days old. He was married to Mary Ann Sharr January 31, 1847, and to this union was born one child, who survives him. On July 3, 1849, he was married to Jane Perkins, and to this union were born 6 children, all of whom survive him. On Nov. 30, 1865, he was married to Nancy Williams and to this union were born 7 children of whom only 2 survive him. ____12 granchildren and _____ great grand children. Four brothers and one sister preceded him to the other shore and two brothers and three sisters are still living.
     Mr. M. R. Dickey served his country during the Civil War in the navy and was honorably discharged.

[Note: remainder of article missing; date of death: 16 Sept. 1908; see obituary for more information]

Gallipolis newspaper
Sept. 1908
Transcribed by Joanne Galvin                                                                            Top of Page

Dickey, Matthew Riley

Good Man Gone
     Mr. M.R. Dickey, of Clipper Mill, died Thursday Sept. 16, 1908, after a painful illness of congestion of the liver. He would have been 87 years old next March. Though he has been able to get around he had been in poor health for some time.
     Mr. Dickey was born in Pennsylvania and came to this county with his parents when but a lad. He was married three times and became the father of fourteen children, of whom the following and his third wife survive.
     Mrs. G. W. Clark and Mrs. John Van Hamm, of Gallipolis, Ira Dickey, of Huntington, Frank, of Rockwood, O., Silas, of Cox’s Landing, Mrs. Bert Irion and Mrs. Laura Wetherholt, of Mercerville, Mrs. Hattie Irwin, of Columbus, and Miss Elma at home. He was an honorable, highly respected citizen, a member of the Methodist church, and a kind and indulgent father and husband. He served several times as Justice of the Peace and stood high in the community and a host of friends will be sorry to know of his death.
     The funeral services will be held at Mina Chapel, Saturday morning where they good man will laid to rest.

Gallipolis Daily Tribune
September 17, 1908
Transcribed by Henny Evans

Dickey, Mathew Riley

Death of Mr. Dickey
     Mr. Mathew Riley Dickey of Clay township, near Clipper Mill, died Thursday, Sept 17, 1908, of pneumonia. Funeral services will be at Ohio Chapel Saturday at 10 a.m. Burial at Mina Chapel by Wetherholt.
     Mr. Dickey was born in Pennsylvania 86 years, 5 months and 25 days ago. He was a young man when he came to this county. He volunteered in 1863 in the U. S. Navy and served during the war. After the war he followed saw milling for the greater part of his life. He was elected Justice in his township three times. He was a member of the M. E. church for a number of years, and was a good citizen well like by all who knew him.
     He had been married three times, first to Mary Ann Shaw. They had one daughter, Mrs. G. W. Clark of 2d avenue of this city. She died in 1848, and he was married later to Mrs. Jane Perkins and they became the parents of three boys and three girls. Their mother died in 1862 and the following children by this wife survive: Ira Dickey of Guyandotte, Frank of Chesapeake, O., C. C. of Campbell, W. Va., Mrs. Harvey Wetherholt of Mercerville, Mrs. Bert Irion of Mercerville and Mrs. Robt. Irion of Columbus. His last wife was Mrs. Nancy Williams, widow of Branddus Williams whom he married in 1865, and she and the following children survive: Mr. J. T. VanHam of this city and Miss Elma, at home.

Gallipolis Daily Tribune
Friday, September 18, 1908
Transcribed by Sandy L. Milliron


Dickey, Silas

Death of Silas Dickey
     Mr. Silas Dickey died at his home in Harrison township Wednesday, Nov. 15, 1905, aged about 65 years. He leaves a wife and three children, Mrs. Dora Drummond of Huntington, Mrs. Harbour of Colorado, and one son, S. K. Dickey at home. He was a brother of Ex-Recorder Elza Dickey.
     Mr. Dickey was a fine man, a good husband and father and was a member of the 141 O. V. I. during the civil war. He had a wide acquaintance and his death will be sincerely regretted by all who knew him. The funeral services will be held at Mt. Pleasant today.

[Stone Note: Cemetery - Mt. Pleasant (Dickey Chapel) Harrison Township.; B. Dec 20, 1836 D. Nov 15 1905]

Gallipolis Bulletin
November 17, 1905
Vol. XXXIX No. 2
Transcribed by Sharon Hobart                                                                         Top of Page


Diggins, Andrew

Death of Andrew Diggins
     Mr. Andrew Diggins departed this life at 1 a. m., this Wednesday morning, Dec. 11, 1901, at the age of 65 years. He had been ill for the past ten years, but confined to his bed off and on for he past year. He leaves a wife and following children. Adaline Bane, Mrs. Sam Frank, Mrs. Mary Broiles, Mrs. Romaine Mayes, Mrs. John Singleton, Miss Jenny Diggins, Mrs. Emma Fiecher (or Flecher), Mrs. Nettie Hover, Mrs. Bertie Hill, and a son Emery Diggins and two brothers, Norman Gibson, of Henderson, WV, and Peter Martin, of Raccoon. The burial will be Thursday at Macedonia, Rev. John Porter officiating. His remains are at Mrs. Sam Frank's on 1st ave.

Death of Andrew Diggins

     We are sorry to chronicle the death of Andrew Diggins, who died Wednesday, December 11, 1901, at one o'clock, aged 68 years, after a long illness with kidney trouble. He was a nice old gentleman and the father of a large family of adult children. The burial occurred at Macedonia Thursday by Wetherholt.

[Note: He was born 27 Jan 1833, so the correct age was 68 years. He was a Civil War Squirrel Hunter.]

Gallipolis Tribune
Dec. 13, 1901
Transcribed by Kathy Hill Lynch


Dodrill, Andrew Avery

     Andrew was born August 10, 1831 in Huntington Township to George and Elizabeth Ewing Dodrill. He married in 1848 to Mary Macomber and his occupation was that of ironmonger. He enlisted in Co. a, 27th Ohio Volunteer Infantry at the age of 31. He died March 2,1863 in LaGrange, Tennessee of typhoid and is buried at Mississippi River National Cemetery.

Created obit from Ewing family research of Nancy Hanks Ewing and war records
March 1863
Created by Henny Evans                                                                                Top of Page


Dodrill, James

     James was born December 29, 1843 in Huntington Township, Gallia County. He moved with his family at the age of 4 to Iowa. He enlisted in Co. H, 4th Iowa Volunteer Infantry. He married Adeline Wyant after his discharge in 1864. They had 5 children before she died in 1878. He married again 3 more times and had one other child by Sarah Jane Powell Dodrill. He lived in Iowa, Missouri and Oklahoma. He died in Tyron, Lincoln County, Oklahoma January 2, 1915 and is buried at the Odd Fellows Cemetery there.

Created obit from Ewing family research of Nancy Hanks Ewing and other records
January 1915
Created by Henny Evans


Donally, Capt. F. J.

Retired Steamboatman Succumbs to Blood Poison in 80th Year
Funeral Held Yesterday
     Capt. F. J. Donally, aged 79 years and 6 months, died at the Athens State Hospital Monday Morning. He had been sent there for treatment two months ago and had improved to such an extent that the family had arranged to bring him home this week. Death resulted from blood poisoning. He had scratched his hand slightly in some way and the wound became infected. To his family and unnumbered friends the news of his passing came as a shock on every band.
     Capt. Donally was a gentleman of the old school. He was politeness personified. He was of French descent and was proud of it and possessed the unfailing courtesy and urbanity and big-heartedness that have made the French the best-loved people on earth. His ancestors came from Ypres, where lately has occurred the bitterest fighting of all history.
     Francis Jefferson Donally was born in this city on Nov. 12, 1837, and was one of its oldest native sons. He was a son of Jefferson and Frances De Vacht Donally. His parents died when he was quite young and he was reared by his grandfather, Joseph De Vacht, a conspicuous figure in the city's early history. When a young man he went to Portsmouth to live with a cousin, Mrs. A. W. Buskirk. He was educated there and later engaged in the shoe business with Uri and Charles Tracy.
     Still later he went on the river and it was as a steamboatman that he was best known. In various capacities he served on the following boats: Peerless, Guiding Star, Mountain Girl, Mountain Boy, Mary Irwin, Ohio No. 3, Ohio No. 4, Gray Eagle, A. C. Donally and Ariadne. During this period he was well-known and highly esteemed all along the Ohio and Mississippi.
     In 1870 Captain Donally was married to Julia E. Dove of Kanawha County, W. Va. She and their two children, Joseph De Vacht Donally, of near this city, and Mrs. Major C. Brown, of Columbus, survive to mourn the loss of a devoted and kind husband and father. His only brother, Eugene, died in 1885.
     After leaving the river, Capt. Donally was wharfmaster here for several years, retiring from business altogether about 25 years ago. Five years ago Capt. Donally became a member of the Presbyterian Church of this city.
     The funeral services were held at the Donally home at 2:30 yesterday afternoon. Rev. V. D. Beery officiating. Burial at Mound Hill by Hayward. The pall bearers were John and Geroge Norvelle and Ben Smithers, all nephews of the decedent, and C. C. Cadot, Frank Sibly and J. H. Ewing.

Stone: D. May 14, 1917 Unit Navy Cap.]

Gallipolis Journal
May 17, 1917
Vol 99 pg 1
Transcribed by Sharon Hobart                                                                       Top of Page


Donally, Joseph A.

An Old Soldier Died Last Thursday--Burial Sunday
     Joseph A. Donally a veteran of the Civil War and a resident of this city for the past six years, died Thursday afternoon at his home on Second Ave. He had been in feeble health for several years.
Mr. Donally was born in Springfield township in 1838 and was married to Miss Helen Cherrington in April 1859. His wife and the following children survive him: Edward, Alice, Will, Mrs. Jeanette Topping, Mrs. Joseph Blakle, M. L. and Mrs. Alden Howell.
     He enlisted in April 1861 in the first company that was raised in this county, Co. G. 18th O. I., serving three months and re-enlisting in the 7th O. V. C. in which he served until the close of the war. He was taken prisoner at Bristol, East Tenn. and confined in Libby prison, from which he and several comrades escaped by tunneling. After the escape he made his way to Washington, where he received a furlough from Sec'y. of War Stanton. Later he participated in the famous Wilson Raid, the siege of Atlanta and other hard fought battles and was a brave and faithful soldier. He was of a genial disposition and had many friends and had been a member of the M. E. church for many years.
     The funeral services were held at Westerman Church near Evergreen Sunday morning at 10 o'clock and the burial at Pine Hill by Hayward & Son.

[Note: Cemetery Pine Hill (Evergreen) Springfield Twp. On stone, name spelled Donally]

Gallipolis Journal
Arpil 3, 1912, Vol 94 No. 14
Transcribed by Sharon Hobart                                                                       Top of Page


Downs, Robert O.

Robert O'Downs Dead
     Robert O'Downs, aged 73, died at the Soldiers Home in Erie County, Wednesday, April 30. The body was shipped here and the funeral was held at the Addison M. E. Church Friday afternoon. Burial in Reynolds cemetery by Wetherholt & Entsminger.
    Mr. O'Downs belonged to the Fourth West Virginia Infantry and served nearly four years in the War between the sections. He is survived by six children by his first wife, who is dead, and by his second wife and one child.

[Note: Robert O. Downs served in Unit Co. C, 4th, Wv. I. He died April 30, 1919. His stone is located (Robert O. Downs) in Addison (Reynolds) Cemetery.]

Gallipolis Bulletin
May 8, 1919
Transcribed by Karen Strojin


Downtain, James G., Major

Major Downtain
Death Ends Career of Former Gallipolis Citizen
     We are pained to hear of the death of our old friend Major J.G. Downtain at Lakeland, Fla., which occurred Monday. He was formerly editor and proprietor of the Putnam (W.Va.) Democrat, but for some time past was a special pension attorney at Washington, D.C., while bold and aggressive in character, was one of the most kindly hearted men that ever breathed the breath of life, high minded an(d) upright as mortal man can be, and fairly idolized by his family which was a large and loving one. We cannot enumerate them but he was the father of Stockton, formerly proprietor of the Huntington Advertiser and later of the Fayette County (W.Va.) Journal and the son-in-law of Mr. and Mrs. James Mullineux of 4th avenue. The other were daughters. We know that that family is in grave affliction at his death, and surely they have our most profound sympathy.
They lived for many years where Hon. Wm. Bradbury now lives on 4th avenue, and we were at their house much and we learned to love him and them very much. We did not know he was in failing health until recently when we saw by the Charleston papers that his son Stock and daughter Madeline were going with him to the Southland.
     The family resided at Winfield, W.Va., and it is said will meet the remains in Washington where they will be cremated. He was a prominent Mason, was 68 years old, and was sent here to the hosptial as a sick soldier during the Civil War. Farewell, old friend and peace be with thee evermore.
     Since putting the above in type, we have received from one of Major Downtain's friends fuller particulars....and which are as follows:

     The many friends of Major Downtain will be pained to hear of his death, which took place Monday morning, at Lakeland, Fla., to which place he had gone in the hope of benefitting his failing health, having suffered for some time with kidney trouble.
     Major Downtain was an enthusiastic Democrat and a newspaper man of great ability,
successfully editing papers at Flemingsburg, Ky., Winfield, and Huntington, W.Va. While enaged in newspaper work at Flemingsburg, he married Miss Grace Stockwell, who with nine children still survive him.
     In 1894 his last paper, The Huntington Advertiser, was destroyed by fire and since that
time he has been employed in the Pension Dep't. at Washington, D.C. At the time of his death his son, Stockwell, and daughter Madeline were with him, doing all that loving care and skill could suggest to prolong life and effect a cure, but death came quickly there in the "Sunny Southland," where his physicians and family hoped the ravages of disease might be arrested, his heroic will gave up the battle, and his peaceful soul winged its flight to the Eternal.
     His remains will be brought to Washington where they will be met by other members of the
family and the Masonic order to which he belonged, when, after paying their last tribute of honor and love the body will be cremeated in the Washington Crematory.
      Mr. Downtain was a resident of this city about fifteen years ago, being pension examiner
at the time, and will be remembered as a rare type of excellent manhood, a staunch and loyal friend, a kind husband and a devoted and loving father. To all of the stricken ones our hearts go out in deepest sympathy and grief, and tho' we know that at a time like this words can do little to comfort hearts in sorrow breaking yet we bid them say, "Thy will be done," knowing well that, "Behind the great unknown, standeth God within the shadow, keeping watch above His own."

[Note: He served in Co. G, 5th West Virginia Infantry and his last rank was given as Sergeant Major.]

Gallipolis Daily Tribune
February 22, 1905
Transcribed by Henny Evans                                                                         Top of Page


Drouillard, Capt. James P.

Death of Capt. Drouillard
     Capt. James P. Drouillard died at his home at Nashville, Tenn., on Sunday evening last, from typhoid fever. A telegram was received here on Monday morning announcing the sad event, and his brother Joseph and sister, Miss Marie, left at once for Nashville.
     Capt. Drouillard was the youngest son of Mr. Joseph Drouillard, of this city, now in his 47th year. Besides the brother and sister mentioned above, he leaves two sisters--Mrs. Capt. James Harper and Mrs. Dr. A.L. Norton.
     He was born in Gallipolis, and in 1857 was sent to West Point by Hon. O.F. Moore. During the war he served on the staff of General Rosecrans, and at its close resigned. While in the service he met Miss Florence Kirkman, of Nashville, whom he married. Since the close of the war he has made his home at Nashville. His wife and four sons and one daughter survive him.

[Note: He was commissioned into the US Army 6th Infantry as a Lt. and in 1862 was promoted to Aide-de-Camp and Captain.]

Gallipolis Bulletin
October 22, 1892
Transcribed by Henny Evans                                                                          Top of Page


Drummond, James R.

     Jas. R. Drummond, who formerly lived in this locality, but of recent years at Crown City, died last Thursday night and was buried near Salem Church at the old Drummond graveyard. The Free Masons of which Mr. D. was a member, had charge of the funeral.

[Note: He has a Grave Registration Card for Civil War and is buried in Houck Cemetery in Harrison Township.]

Gallipolis Bulletin (Under Sand Fork News)
December 12, 1894
Transcribed by Henny Evans


Drummond, James Timothy

Death of Mr. James T. Drummond

     Mr. J.T. Drummond[s] died at his home No. 512 Fourth Avenue Friday, Jan. 8, 1926, after a long illness at the age of 88 years. He leaves two sons and two daughters J.M. Drummond[s] of Mudsock, Tom
Drummond[s] and one daughter of Huntington and Mrs. Catherine Boster of Lincoln.
     Short services were held at 9 a.m. Monday at the residence by Rev. Fields. His body will be taken to Mudsock to Walnut church where services will be held by Rev. McConnell. Burial in charge of Undertaker Tope.

[Note: He served Co. E, 141st Ohio Volunteer Infantry and as a Squirrel Hunter. He is buried in Drummond/Folden Cemetery in Walnut Township.]

Gallipolis Daily Tribune
January 9, 1926
Transcribed by Henny Evans


Drummond, Lewis

Death of Mr. Lewis Drummond
     A telegram from Mr. Morris Drummond, his son, to Mrs. Clayton Poore, Sunday, announced the death of Mr. Lewis Drummond at Cincinnati Sunday morning at 3:30. His remains will leave on boat this Monday evening for this place, reaching here Tuesday night, the funeral being at Clay Chapel Wednesday afternoon at 2 o'clock. He leaves a wife and two children, Mrs. Edgar Graham and son Morris. His wife was Miss Poole of Clay township, and they were residents of this city quite awhile. He was a very excellent gentleman with many friends.

[Note: He served in Co. I, 36th Ohio Volunteer Infantry.]

Gallipolis Daily Tribune
January 22, 1900
Transcribed by Henny Evans                                                                          Top of Page


Drummond, Robert J.

R.J. Drummond Dead
     Mr. R.J. Drummond died at his home on Pine street Tuesday night. He was about seventy-nine years old and has been a resident of this city for thirty years. He leaves one daughter Miss Cassie, his wife having died about seven months ago.
     The funeral of Mr. Drummond will occur Friday at one o'clock at the residence by Rev. Mr. Wood of the Methodist church. Burial at Pine Street cemetery by Wetherholt & Entsminger.

[Note: He served as a Squirrel Hunter. Dates on the stone, 1839-1918.]

Gallipolis Daily Tribune
August 25, 1918
Transcribed by Henny Evans


Drummond, Samuel

Death of Samuel Drummond
     Capt. Samuel Drummond of Cadmus whose illness was frequently noted in these columns, died Monday
morning, August 6, 1900, and was buried Tuesday at 11 o'clock. In his death his community lost a fine old
citizen and soldier, who was respected wherever known.
     He was a son of Thornton and Lucy Stover (Drummond), and was born in Walnut township, February 2d, 1826, and was married in Lawrence county, June 16, 1850, to Lucinda Saunders. He left a son Sylvester, of Harrison, and daughters, Mrs. John T. Stuart, of Lincoln, Mrs. Hattie M. Barger. There may be others, as our informant lives in town and cannot well remember.
     He was an Odd Fellow and Mason, a Justice of the Peace for nine years, Township Trustee, etc. In the
Civil War, he enlisted in Co. G, 117th O.V.I., and was commissioned a 2d Lieutenant, and was tranferred to the 1st O.H.A. and served two years, retiring because of disability.
     He left a fine farm. His funeral services were conducted by Rev. Whitmer, and were impressive and
largely attended. We believe he was Postmaster at the time of his death and had been for eight years. His wife preceded him to the better land a few years ago.

[Note: He is buried in Olive Cemetery in Walnut Township.]

Gallipolis Daily Tribune
August 9, 1900
Transcribed by Henny Evans


Dufour, August

Trench Veteran Taken
     Death ended the suffering of August Dufour at midnight Wednesday after a long illness from cancer of the stomach. He was born in France 74 years ago, and came to America at the age of four years with his parents. He lived for a time at Gallipolis, later removing to Ironton.
     At the time of the Civil War he enlisted in the First Ohio Light Artillery and served four years and three months. He is survived by his wife and three sons and a like number of daughters....Irontonian
     Mr. Dufour was a brother of the late "Jack" Dufour of this city,
and the brothers served in the same regiment during the war.

Gallia Times
October 25, 1916
Transcribed by Henny Evans                                                                          Top of Page


Dufour, John C. (Jack)

Well Known Constable and Interesting Character Passed Away, Wednesday
     Constable Jack Dufour, residing in the west limits of the city, died Wednesady after a lingering illness, aged nearly 68. Mr. Dufour was a native of France but was of American growth. He was a member of Capt. E. S. Aleshire's heavy artillery during the war and served throughout.
     After the war he married Virginia F. Mears and she and one daughter, Mr. George Black of Hartford, Iowa, survive him. He was a constable for many years and therefore a familiar figure on the streets. As a young man he was widely known as a ball player, and was a pitcher for the Des Moines team and other leading teams of that day. He could throw a ball farther than anyone he ever met, and many interesting stories are told of his prowess on the diamond.
     Mr. Dufour was an interesting and picturesque character and his death is greatly deplored. The funeral will be conducted by Rev. J. O. Newton at the residence at one o'clock today. Burial in Pine St. cemetery by Wetherholt.

[Stone Note: DuFour, John Claudius; B. Feb 28, 1847; D. March 5, 1914 Unit Co. F. 2nd OHA]

Gallipolis Journal
March 6, 1914 Vol. 96 No. 9
Transcribed by Sharon Hobart


Dunbar, Capt Samuel A.

Dunbar Funeral
     The funeral of the late Capt. S.A. Dunbar was at 2 o'clock Sunday at the family residence. The services of the Episcopal church were conducted by the Rev. Mr. McGhee of Pt. Pleasant, followed by the Knight Templar service by The Rose Commandery.
     The pall bearers were as follows: Active -Dr. Hanson, H. C. Johnson, S.A. Moore, Dr. Lupton, C.M. Adams and Chas. Garard; Honorary - Harry Maddy, W.N. Shartz, Fritz Nunencamp, Fred. Hanson, Dr. Kineon and Foster Burdell.
     The interment was at Mound Hill by Hayward.

[Note: There is a burial for S. A. Dunbar in Mound Hill Cemetery.    B. 1845 D. 1918. Samuel Dunbar enlisted August 2, 1864 in the US Navy and served on the USS Yantic.]

Newspaper and date unknown
Gallipolis, Ohio
Transcribed by Margaret Calvin


Duncan, John Robert

John R. Duncan, Civil War Veteran, Died Sunday
     The death of John Robert Duncan of 40 Vinton St., this city, occurred Sunday evening, April 10th, 1921, at 7 p.m. Mr. Duncan was seventy-seven years and nine months of age and leaves to mourn his loss, his wife, Margaret Duncan, and three children, two living in Charleston, and one in Illinois. He was a Civil War veteran, belonging to Company F, 7th Regiment, West Virginia Cavalry and was confined in the Libby and Anderson [probably Andersonville] prison for eighteen months.
     Funeral services will be held Wednesday afternoon at the house at 2:30 by Rev. Morrell with interment at Pine Street cemetery in charge of Wetherholt & Entsminger.

[Note: Libby prison was for officers only and he was a private. It was often mixed up with Belle Isle Prison for enlisted men. Both prisons were in Richmond, but were very different places.]

Gallipolis Daily Tribune
April 12, 1921
Transcribed by Henny Evans                                                                          Top of Page


Dyer, William

     Mr. Wm. Dyer, of Springfield township, a faithful old soldier, who has lived on Capt. J.B. Clendenin's farm for the past sixteen years, and who was an honest, upright citizen, died last Thursday, and was buried with the honors of war at Mound Hill Friday.

[Note: He served in Co. I, 36th Ohio Volunteer Infantry and is actually buried in Mt. Olive in Springfield Township.]

Gallipolis Journal
March 21, 1888
Transcribed by Henny Evans


Eachus, George W.

In Memory of G[eorge] W. Eachus.
     On the calm, peaceful evening of July 9th, 1896, when myraids [sic] of silvery stars shone in cloudless blue, the evening zephyrs sighed through the quivering leaves and lulled our father to a sweet repose that knows no waking; and after years of suffering he rests in peace.

Softly the night o'er our sad home was creeping:
Brightly the stars shone in heaven's blue dome,
When the death angel came at God's bidding
And bore our dear father home.

Our once happy home is now darkened with sorrow,
Our hearts bowed in grief, that once were so light,
Since at his bed side in life's greatest anguish,
We whispered the sad words, 'Good night.'

We have laid, gently laid his precious body,
To peacefully rest in the silent  grave;
'Tis the Lord who hath taken him from us,
'Twas the Lord who unto us gave.
Then blessed be the name of our Savior!
He will call us to Him one by one,
For He doeth in love whatever is best,
O God, may Thy will e're be done.

When we at last gather home to mansions above,
With our loved ones who have gone on before;
Oh what joy that will be
If we are all, all there at home to part no more.

Soon our broken home circle will be renewed,
And loved ones we soon will be joining;
Then no more we will bid our father 'good night,'
But in heaven we'll bid him 'good morning.

[Note: He served in Co. F, 141st Ohio Volunteer Infantry, Co. C, 194th Ohio Volunteer Infantry and as a Squirrel Hunter.]

The Gallipolis Journal
Tuesday July 28, 1896
Transcribed and Submitted by Linda Tope Trent


Eads, Charles C.

Charles C. Eads, Civil War Soldier, Is Dead
     Charles C. Eads, a veteran of the Civil War, died early Tuesday morning from pneumonia at the age of eighty-five. Several children survive, his wife dying about two years ago. Funeral services were held Tuesday at 10 a.m., and burial will be in Pine street cemetery. Arrangements are in charge of A.E. Tope.

[Note: He served in Co. K, 67th Ohio Volunteer Infantry.]

Gallipolis Daily Tribune
February 2, 1932
Transcribed by Henny Evans                                                                          Top of Page


Eagle, G. W.

     Mr. G. W. Eagle, son of Henry Eagle, formerly of Greenbrier County, West Virginia, was born December 15, 1821, near his home at the time of his death, in Raccoon township, this county. He was educated in the public schools and for several years was engaged in teaching during the winter months. December 31, 1845, he was married to the Leantha Glenn. Of this union they were born nine children; Marietta, Mrs. Sard Cole, of, Gallipolis; William Henry, of Vinton; Permelia died November 22, 1864; John F., of Vinton; Hortense, Mrs. David Welker, of Vinton; Sarah, Mrs. John Shack, of Vinton; Ella, Mrs. L. E. Gross, of Rio Grande; Ada, Mrs. C.. Wood of Rio Grande and George W., Jr., who is at the home in Raccoon township.
     Mr. Eagle was very successful as a farmer in stock dealer, and gain the confidence of the people as a safe and reliable businessman. He was a trusted friend to Mr. and Mrs. Atwood, founders and donors of Rio Grande College. In 1875 he was chosen on a committee of five to select the board of trustees 24 members for the college. He was member of this board and a member of the executive committee from the organization to the time of his death. Mr. Eagle and Rev. I. Z. Haning were selected as a committee to build the boarding hall in 1874.
     August 16, 1876, Mrs. Permilla Wood gave and devised to Mr. Eagle and Mr. Haning all her property in trust for the use and benefit of Rio Grande College; and they were also appointed executors. After the death of Rev. Haning in 1879, Mr. Eagle was the sole trustee and executor until March 1891, when failing health caused him to tender his resignation. Of $80,000 in his hands for many years all was so carefully invested that not a dollar was lost, which in itself is a good testimony to his ability as a businessman.
     For several years Mr. Eagle was declining under the influence of a fatal disease, Bright's disease. He never complained nor lost his usual interest in public affairs. He was a member of the Old Sanctuary Church, and gave testimony in his last days that he was ready and willing to die. He died May 22, 1892, and was buried at Mt. Tabor Cemetery, May 24, Rev. Williams Woodyard, officiating. In Mr. Eagle's death the community has lost a valuable and enterprising citizen and society has lost a worthy and useful member. A friend.

[Note: He served as a Squirrel Hunter.]

Unmarked newspaper of Gallia County in possession of Helen Eagle Halley
Transcribed by Jessica L. Weber

Eagle, William H.

Death of William H. Eagle

     On Thursday last Mr. William H. Eagle died at his residence on Second Street, after a painful illness of several weeks. He was born August 15th, 1818, in Raccoon Township, this county. He remained there until August, 1877, when he removed to this city, at which time he gave up active business to enjoy a well earned competency. October 13th, 1858, he married Miss Margaret A. Womeldorff, by whom he leaves three sons, Oscar, Sherman and Roscoe.
     The funeral took place on Saturday last, and was attended by a large number of relatives and friends. Rev. Mr. Stubbins conducted the service, with Messrs. Hayward & Son as undertakers. The remains were taken to Mt. Zion for burial.
     Mr. Eagle was a man who enjoyed the respect of all who knew him. He was an indulgent father, a kind  neighbor, and above all an honest man. The family have the sincere sympathy of many friends.

[Note: His tombstone is found in Mound Hill rather than in Mt. Zion. He served as a Squirrel Hunter.]

Gallipolis Bulletin
April 24, 1888
Transcribed by Henny Evans


Earwood, Ampudia

Ampudia, Earwood
     Mr. Ampudia Earwood died at the home of his son John in this city Friday, Jan. 1, 1904, after a long illness, aged 56 years. He was born and raised near Thevenin and had many friends who will be sorry to hear of his death. The remains were taken to Thevenin, where services were conducted by Rev. John Porter, interment following by Wetherholt.

[Note: Co L, 7th OVC in the Civil War]

Gallipolis Bulletin
January 8, 1904
Transcribed by Margaret Calvin


Eats, Phillip

Resolutions of Respect
Headquarters Cadot Post, No. 126
G.A.R., Gallipolis, O , April 12, '92

BE IT RESOLVED-That in the death of Comrade Phillip Eats, who died in this city on the 5th day of April, 1892, that this Post has sustained a loss, and has caused a vacancy which cannot be filled.
            RESOLVED, That we bow in submission to Him who doeth all things for the best.
            RESOLVED, That this Post be draped in mourning, and that a copy of these proceedings
be spread on the Adjutant's Record. That they be published in all the city papers. Comrade Eats was a member of the 18th Battery, Ohio Light Artillery Volunteers, and faithfully served his county.
        E.L. GILLIS
        Wm. H. JOHNSON
        IRA W. BOOTON
                 Committee

[Note: From Stone Mina Chapel in Green TWP...10/28/1819-4/8/1897]

Gallipolis Journal
Wed April 20, 1892
Transcribed by Charles Wright                                                                       Top of Page


Edler, George

Another Veteran Gone
     George Edler died at his home at Patriot, Tuesday, March 11, 1913 aged 75 years. He was a member of the 5th Virginia regiment during the war and drew a pension. He was a good man and is survived by a wife and several children.

[Note: The National Parks Civil War Website lists his service as being in the 2nd and 4th West Virginia Voluntary Infantry.]

Gallipolis Bulletin
March 13, 1913, Thursday
Transcribed by Debbie Carter Evans


Edler, John H.

An Old Veteran of the Civil War Passes Away at His Home at Patriot
     Mr. John H. Edler whose failing condition of health was mentioned in the Tribune recently, passed away at his home near Patriot at 9 o’clock Thursday morning, November 21st, 1901, aged 57 years.
     The funeral services will be conducted Saturday morning at 10 o’clock under the auspices of Lincoln Post G. A. R., the burial by Undertaker Wetherholt following at the Ripley cemetery.
      Mr. Edler was a veteran of the Civil War being a member of Capt. L. Z. Cadot’s Company A, of Col. John A. Turley’s regiment, the old time tried 91st O. V. I. and participated in the early battles of the war in West Virginia.
      At the Battle of Cloyd Mountain he received several severe wounds, at the time supposed to be mortal. Mr. J. Hunter Carter, of this city, and of the same regiment was only a short distance behind Mr. Edler when he was wounded, and found him pale and exhausted and almost in a dying condition, lying propped up on a root of a tree, where he had crawled. He asked Mr. Carter for water, and Carter gave him his canteen, which was full, and he drank the whole of it. He always said this saved his life. While the Union Army won this battle, for some reason, they could not take care of their wounded, and Carter bade his old comrade “goodbye”, and passed on never expecting to see him alive again and he lay where he was left for three days and nights without food or water, when the guerrillas or others took him prisoner and he lay in prison for seven or eight months, part of the time being spent at Libby, Andersonville and Belle Isle prisons. At Libby prison he got so near death’s door, that they carried him to what was called the “dead house” one night, thinking that he had but a few moments to live, but he rallied during the night, and was carried back to the prison and recovered sufficiently to be finally exchanged, and returned to his regiment, though on account of his wounds in the arm, side and back, he was never able to perform only light duties afterward.
     Since receiving his honorable discharge as a soldier of the Union Army, he has lived a life of anguish and suffering and for total disability to do manual labor on account of his wounds and eyesight, he drew a pension of $72 per month.
     Mr. Edler was an honest square man in all of his dealings with his fellowmen, enjoying their greatest respect and highest esteem, and none will hear of his death without grief.

The Gallipolis Weekly Tribune
(Home Chronicles Happenings of Interest to the People of Gallia)
Friday, November 29, 1901
Transcribed by Sandy Bledsoe                                                                       Top of Page


Edmiston, Francis Marion

     Francis Marion Edmiston, the second child of William and Margaret M.(McGhee) Edmiston, was born May 29, 1837 in Gallia Co. and died in 1918 in Columbus, Ohio. He was a farmer, stock dealer and miller. Francis enlisted in Aug. of 1862 in the Independent Co. of the Trumbull Guards and was discharged July 2, 1865.
     On June 3, 1869, in Gallia Co. he was married to Catherine S. Cherrington, born Jan 17, 1845 and died Sept. 1939 in Columbus, Ohio, the daughter of John M. and Lydia (Waddell) Cherrington. Catherine and Francis are buried in the Greenlawn Cemetery, Columbus, Ohio. Five children were born to them: William Edward Edmiston, Virginia Margaret Edmiston, Elbert E. Edmiston, Myra M.Edmiston and Lydia Ellen Edmiston.

From a family compilation belonging to Mary Lanier
Abstracted by Henny Evans


Edwards, David R.

David Edwards Union Soldier, Passes Away
Only Eight Old Veterans Left in County---Only Four Left in Meigs Co.
     Death of "Squire" David R. Edwards, aged 94, at his home in Greenfield tp. on Sunday leaves but eight Union veterans in this county. His address was Oak Hill, R.D. 4 and he made his home with his daughter, Mrs. John F. Evans, near Peniel. Nor is there any veteran of the War between the States left in Greenfield
or any adjoining township.
     Mr. Edwards was born in Wales but came to this country when but a child. Unless the writer misunderstood a telephone conversation, the decedent and his parents arrived at Gallipolis on July 4, 1847.
During the war he served in an Ohio regiment and later became well-known in Jackson and Lawrence counties as well as Gallia and worked at the various iron furnaces in the tri-county area.
     He had not been here often lately, but it is recalled that on the occasion of a visit not so many months ago his friends said he was one of the most active and vigorous of the old soliders. He is survived by, in addition to the daughter, Mrs. Margaret Evans, three sons, Stephen of Blackfork, Llewellyn of Jackson, and David C. Edwards.
     Funeral services were held at 2 o'clock today at Bethel church. Burial in the cemetery there. The surviving veterans of the '60s are Dr. A.B. Garrett, the only in Gallipolis, or in the tier of townships extending straight across the county to the Jackson line; Hugh P. Halley, Bladen; Harvey Russell, Vinton; Jacob Spires, Alice; M.C. Boice, Cheshire; James Gatewood, Crown City; T.J. Clark, Thurman; Francis W. Brookman, Kerr.

[Note: He served in Co. C, 179th O.V.I.]

Gallipolis Daily Tribune
March 31, 1937
Transcribed by Henny Evans                                                                          Top of Page


Edwards, Evan E.

Civil War veteran Called to His Reward
Evan E. Edwards Passed Away Last Week at His Home Near Rio Grande
     In the death of Mr. Evan E. Edwards of near Rio Grande last Tuesday, April 22, 1922, Gallia County lost one of her best citizens. Mr. Edwards was born September 26, 1845, in the Tyn Rhos neighborhood, and at the time of his death was aged 76 years, 6 months and 15 days.
     He was a son of Edward and Mary Edwards, who were pioneer settlers of our county and emigrants from Wales. Of his brothers and sisters, of whom there were nine, there remains but one, Mrs. Mary Humphries of Shawnee, Ohio, who was present at the funeral. Mr. Edwards spent his youth on a farm near Tyn Rhos, and during the Civil War, when he became of military age, he volunteered in the service of the Union, and was enrolled as a private on August 6, 1864. In Company D, 179th Ohio, under command of Capt. James Grafton, and was honorably discharged on June 17, 1865.
     He was married to Julia A. Rickabaugh on July 22, 1869. To this union were born nine children, all of whom survive him. They are: Elza E. of Athens, Edward W. of Gallipolis, Mrs. S.N. Samuels, Mrs. D.R. Jones and Mrs. John E. Davis of Rio Grande, Mrs. J.J. Peters, Mrs. W.R. Perkins and Mrs. F.C. Shears of Columbus, and Wilbur W. of Powell, Ohio. There were 38 grandchildren, eight of whom have preceded him, and three great- grandchildren.
     He manifested a remarkable affection for his children and grandchildren, and his happiest moments were spent with them. He became a Sunday School student early in life at Tyn Rhos, and about 50 years ago became a member of Old Pine U.B. Church, and remained an active worker until his death, having served in all deparments of official work, and served as teacher in the Sunday School longer than any other member of the church.
     Mr. Edwards was an engineer by profession and became widely acquainted over Gallia and Jackson counties. His illness was brief, but the disease preyed rapidly upon his vitality. He was tenderly cared for by his wife and children during his last illness and they have the sympathy of many friends in their great loss. The funeral was held Thursday at Old Pine Church and was largely attended.

[Note: He was buried in Old Pine Cemetery.]

Gallia Times
April 22, 1922
Transcribed by Henny Evans                                                                          Top of Page


Edwards, Richard D.

     Richard Edwards was born December 12, 1836 in Wales and came to the United States with his parents David and Hannah Evans Edwards in 1837. He married Sarah Macomber in 1861 and they lived in Ewington all of their married life. They were the parents of ten children.
     He enlisted in Co. I, 173rd Ohio Volunteer Infantry in September 1864 and was discharged in June 1865. He died in 1915 and is buried in  Mt. Tabor Cemetery in Huntington Township.

Created obit from Nancy Hank Ewing research and soldier records
1915
Created by Henny Evans


Elias, Henry Parry

     Henry Parry Elias was born in Saint Asaph, Dembyshire, North Wales, March 3, 1834 to John and Elizabeth Parry Elias. He came with his parents to America and settled in Cincinnati in 1838. Henry never married. He worked in Cincinnati as a retail jeweler and owned the St. James Hotel there. He then went to Gallia County and was engaged in the queensware business. He owned several farms in Mason County, West Virginia and settled on the one in Hannan District in 1879.
     In 1861 he entered the Union Army as sutler and purveyor of the 5th Ohio Volunteer Infantry and served until the war closed. He died August 10, 1881.

Created from Mason County, West Virginia History and war records
August 1881
Created by Henny Evans


Elkins, Andrew

Death of an Old Veteran
     Mr. Andrew Elkins, a veteran of the civil war, died at his home near Bladen last Friday morning. He was the father of eleven children, eight of whom survive. He was a member of the 13th Virginia during the war, and the funeral services, Saturday afternoon at Bethel M. E. Church, were under the auspices of Morton Post, G.A.R.

[Note: Birth from stone Bethel in Ohio twp. Oct 7, 1824; Died July 10, 1903; Civil War website lists 7th WV Cavalry for Andrew Elkins, but several other Elkins in the 13th West Virginia.]

Gallipolis Bulletin
July 17, 1903
Transcribed by Charles Wright

Elkins, Andrew

Death of Mr. Elkins
     Mr. Elkins, an old soldier, living back of Bladen, died Friday afternoon, and was buried this afternoon at Clay Chapel. He was a nice old man and left a wife and a family of adult age.

Gallipolis Daily Tribune
Saturday, July 11, 1903
Transcribed by Sandy L. Milliron


Elkins, William

     William Elkins, private Co. B, 173d O.V.I., died at Nashville, Tenn., Jan. 2d, 1865, leaves a wife and child.

[Note: The above is taken from a list of those who died in the war. He died at the Nashville General Hospital and was buried in Nashville National Cemetery.]

The Gallipolis Journal
November 9, 1865
Transcribed by Eva Swain Hughes                                                                 Top of Page


Elliott, James H.

     James Elliott was born about 1843 and enlisted in Co. G, 172nd Ohio Volunteer Infantry at the age of 21. He died of disease July 12, 1864 in Gallipolis, quite possibly at the Field Hospital. He is also buried in Gallipolis and is likely in an unknown soldier's grave at Pine Street Cemetery. His mother received his pension.

Constructed from service records
1864
Constructed by Henny Evans


Elliot, Martin S.

     Martin S. Elliot, Corporal, enlisted July 28th, 1861, from Guyan township, died of chronic diarrhea, at Milikins, La., May 28th, 1863, unmarried.

[Note: The above is taken from a list of those who died in the war. He enlisted in Co. G, 4th West Virginia Infantry. May 25, 1863 is also given as a date of death.]

The Gallipolis Journal
September 7, 1865
Transcribed by Eva Swain Hughes


Ely, Alfred W.

Death of Mr. Ely.
     Mr. Alfred W. Ely died at his home at Charity, Friday, October 3, 1902, after a long illness with paralysis,
aged 71 years. In 1855 he was married to Miss Margaret Knapp at Mason City, W.Va. and to this union eleven children were born, eight of who survive. They are W.C. Ely of Kyger; A.L. Ely, Jr. of Los Angeles,
Cal., Dr. C. W. Ely of Cheshire;Mrs. Ida M. Warner, of Cheshire; Mrs. Julia A. Kelley, of Columbus; Edward Ely, of Columbus; Frank Ely, of Parkersburg, W.Va. and Mrs. Millie Shaver, of Cheshire.
     Mr. Ely was an honest, upright citizen, highly esteemed by his neighbors and a veteran of the civil war. He was a consistent Christian and died in the firm belief that all was well with him.
     The funeral services were conducted Sunday by Rev. J. M. Davis, interment following at Gravel Hill.

Gallipolis Bulletin
Oct. 10, 1902
Vol. XXXV No. 50
Transcribed by Charles Wright                                                                       Top of Page


Embleton, John George

     John Geoge Embleton was born June 29, 1839 at Coxhoe township of Coxhoe County of Durham, England, and came with his parents to the United States when about 7 or 8 years of age. He settled in Schuyukill County, Pa., and remained there a few years, when he came on to Hartford, W. Va. and following mining.
     On March 8, 1862, he was married to Miss Mary F. Lewis, who preceded him to the world beyond on March 30, 1915. They had no children.
     On the 24th day of Aug. 1862, he enlisted in Co. D, 13th W.Va Infantry to fight for his country. He was discharged from the army Sept. 10, 1863.. He settled in Kyger district about 15 years ago, and was a member of the M. E. church there. He joined that church at the age of 22 and was a fine Christian gentleman.   
     After locating at Kyger he became a member of the Grand Army Post there and was chaplain of the order at the time of his death, which was on April 13, when his age was 76 years, 9 months and 15 days.
     Funeral at the M. E. Church on Saturday by Rev. George Lightner, burial at the Kyger cemetery by undertaker DeMaine.
     At the time of his death he made his home with Rodney Raymond where he was well cared for. He was followed to the cemetery by a large concourse of sorrowing friends, not one of whom was a blood relative.

The Gallia Times
4/19/1916
Vol. XVIII No. 16
Transcribed by Charles Wright


Errett, Henry

     Mr. Henry Errett, a well-to-do farmer, living near (a mile above) the Koontz bridge, Perry township, was found dead Friday, about noon, near his barn. He had left his house between 9 and 10 o'clock in perfect health. Mr. J.T. Robinson was with him about that time and insured his barn, and they ate a melon together, and laughed and talked together. His grand-daughter, Annie Van Pelt, about 12 years, was sent by Mrs. Errett to the field, where he was supposed to be working, after corn, and was told to go by him and get him to pull it for her. She failed to find him, but got the corn and dinner was prepared, and when dinner was prepared, and when ready Mr. Errett was looked for and called, but could not be found. They supposed he had gone after a Durham that had broken out. They waited awhile, and he not coming, they sat down and ate a few bites of dinner, but Mrs. Errett became uneasy, and told the little girl they would go and hunt him. Mrs. Errett went the way he had gone to the field, and the little girl went another way, south, and found him lying dead on his face just a few steps from one of their barns, his face in his hat. They gave an alarm, calling Ex-Sheriff Joe Martin, just across the creek, and Dan Jones and Burt Davis and may be others, who came and carried him into the house. He had apparently been dead for some hours and was cold.
     Esquire A.S. Ripley, of Patriot, held an inquest, and rendered a verdict of heart disease of which he had complained, more or less, for a year. His funeral services will be conducted by Rev. Cary at Salem Church, near the Wood's cross roads in Perry, Sunday morning, the burial following at the same place by Wetherholt.
     Mr. Errett was 61 years old and leaves a widow, son George and married daughters, Mrs. George Waugh and Mrs. Joseph Van Pelt. He lost two sons with typhoid fever less than three years ago, at one time, Noah and Reuben, both being buried at the same time. His wife was a daughter of the late Noah Wood and was a sister of Mrs. Gooch, who died recently, and of Mrs. John Slagle, of Cadmus, and Mrs. Pleasant Gills of Patriot. He was a spendid citizen and a solder in the old 141st O.V.I. in Captain Isaac Mauck's company and drew a pension. He was in good circumstances. His death is a source of profound regret to all, and his family will have the sympathy of all who know them.

[Note: both his tombstone and death record call them Eritte, not Errett]

Gallipolis Daily Tribune
September 11, 1897
Transcribed by Henny Evans                                                                          Top of Page


Erwin, Albert

Death of Albert Erwin
     Albert Erwin, an old soldier and well respected citizen of Bidwell died Tuesday evening after an illness of only a few days from a paralytic stroke coupled with heart trouble.
     The funeral was held at Fairview Thursday afternoon at two o'clock conducted by Rev. R. R. Denney. The interment in the church cemetery.

[Note: From Stone 1838 Died Aug. 1907]

Gallipolis Bulletin
Aug. 20, 1907
Vol. XXXX, No. 72
Transcribed by Charles Wright


Erwin, Francis

     Mr. Francis Erwin, of Wilkesville died Feb. 6. He was a soldier of the old 56th Ohio and enlisted under Capt. Evans.

[Note: He was in Co. E, 56th Ohio Volunteer Infantry. He was born about 1821.]

Gallipolis Daily Tribune
February 17, 1899
Transcribed by Henny Evans                                                                          Top of Page


Estep, Samuel 

Samuel Estep
     Samuel Estep was born at Coal River, Boone County, W.Va., Feb. 7, 1835 and died at his home in Kyger, Gallia County, O., April 21, 1912, aged 77 yrs., 2 mo., and 14 days.
     He was married to Nancy Baldwin Dec. 21, 1855.  To this union were born five children, two of them dying while young. He is survived by his wife and three children, Mrs. Anna Boram at home, Edward in Kansas and Chas. in Iowa, besides quite a number of other relatives to mourn his loss.
     He was commander of Chas. Lyons Post No. 447 G.A.R of this place, a devoted member of the Christian Church and since moving to this place less than two years ago has made many warm friends and will be greatly missed by his associates in the community.  

[Note: Buried in Cheshire]  

Gallipolis Bulletin
May 9, 1912 
Transcribed by Charles Wright


Evans, Daniel T.

     Died, at half past 12 o'clock Sunday night, March 15th, 1863, at the residence of Thos. L. Evans, Cincinnati, Ohio, Capt. Daniel T. Evans, of the firm of T. Evans & Son, Centreville, Gallia county, Ohio, aged 28 years, 5 months and 9 days. Capt. Evans gallantly responded to the call of the Governor last September, when the rebels drove our troops out of the Kanawha Valley, and threatened our town, although laboring at the time under a severe cold, and gathering his neighbors together, formed them into a company and repaired at once to Gallipolis. He remained with his command in the Chickamauga bottom until all danger was over, but was never well afterwards. He was advised to go to Cincinnati, which he did on 2d of March, and placed himself under the care of an eminent physician, and everything was done to restore him to health, but of no avail, and he died as above.
     Sorrowingly and sadly will his numerous friends and admirers receive the news of his death. Fond parents stand weeping over the honored remains that bring to them the bitter pangs of bereavement; a wife and three little ones are crushed beneath the heavy blow; and every loyal heart in the county owes to Daniel T. Evans' glorious memory all the tributes of affection that can be bestowed upon it.

Beyond this vale of tears
There is a life above,
Unmeasured by the flight of years;
And all that life is love.

[Note: Name was not on the list of Squirrel Hunters, probably because he died before the list came out.]

The Gallipolis Journal
March 26, 1863
Transcribed by Eva Swain Hughes


Evans, David O.

Mr. Evans Died
     Mr. David O. Evans, who was kicked by a horse, the details of which were given in the Tribune, when it happened, died this morning, April 23, 1903. His wife died it is said on the same day of the month and at the same hour, four years ago. There is left a large number of children, one dead. Of the funeral services and burial we have no particulars. Mr. Evans was one of the nicest men in the county and his untimely death is regretted by all.

[Note: Death Certificate...Born: 1835 Wales; died April 23, 1903 Raccoon Township, Gallia County, Ohio; age 68 years. Widower.  Buried in Ebenezer Cemetery in Raccoon Township as David D. Squirrel Hunter in the Civil War.]

Gallipolis Daily Tribune
April 23, 1903
Transcribed by F.K. Brown
                                                                            Top of Page


Evans, David R.

Death of David R. Evans
     Mr. David R. Evans died at the Soldiers Home at Dayton, O., Thursday. Mr. Evans was a former resident of Rio Grande and was postmaster there for many years. He was also a Civil War veteran and spent the last few months at the home in Dayton. He leaves one daughter Miss Dora Evans of near Rio Grande.
     Funeral services were held at Tyn Rhos Saturday at 2:30 p.m.

[Note: He served in Co. D, 179th Ohio Volunteer Infantry.]

Gallipolis Daily Tribune
April 27, 1925
Transcribed by Henny Evans

Evans, David R.

     David R. Evans was born near Vega, Jackson County, Ohio, Sept. 13, 1845, and departed this life
April 23, 1925, being almost 80 years old. He was the son of the late Reese and Nancy Evans. He was united in marriage with Mary Ann Davis March 26, 1868, who departed this life March 16, 1873, leaving three children. He was married to Rachel Davis April 4, 1876, and she died Sept. 22, 1896, leaving three children. Five of his children have preceded him in death, one daughter, Miss Dora, only surviving.
     He professed faith in Christ and united with the Siloam Congregational church many years ago; when he located at Rio Grande he placed his membership with the Calvary Baptist church and remained a faithful
member until death. He loved the church and was a regular attendant at Sunday School and church services as long as health permitted.
     Brother Evans was a soldier in the Civil War, being a member of Co. D, 179th Regiment O.V.I.,
and served until the close of the war when he was discharged. He entered the Soldiers' Home at Dayton May 22, 1924, where he heard the call of the Lord when he said, "It is enough, thou hast been faithful over a few
things, I will make thee ruler over man things; enter thou into the joys of thy Lord."
     The funeral was held at Tyn Rhos church Saturday afternoon, April 25, by Rev. W.J. Fulton
assisted by Prof. C.O. Clark and Rev. Barbour.
     I hereby extend thanks to neighbors and friends for their kindness and sympathy in my time of
sorrow. Dora Evans

Gallia Times
1925
Transcribed by Henny Evans


Evans, Evan S.

Burns to Death
Tragic End of Exemplary Life of Evan S. Evans
     Accidentally or as the result of an attack of heart trouble, the venerable Evan S. Evans fell into a blazing brush heap and was burned to death, Saturday afternoon, while working alone on his farm on Tick Ridge, between Vinton and Thurman. The lifeless body, the clothing burned off and the flesh terribly scared and burned, was found by Everett Evans, a son, who became alarmed when his father failed to return to the house when expected.
     The news of the tragic fate that had befallen this splendid and well-known man, who was the father of ex-Treasurer Isaac Evans, caused a great shock and brot poignant sorrow to many hearts.
     Mr. Evans was born in Wales nearly 83 years ago but came to this country with his parents when but 3 years old. He was a member of the Calvinistic Methodist Church at Centerville, and a Union soldier. During his service as a soldier his health was seriously impaired and he never fully recovered. He is survived by his wife Mary Evans (that was also her maiden name), three sons, the two previously mentioned and Abram, living
in Montana, and two daughters, Mrs. Mary Richards of Athens, and Miss Anna May Evans, a teacher in the Vinton schools.
     These dutiful sons and daughters had done everything in their power to lessen life's burden for their aged parents during their declining years. For them and the aged and disconsolate widow much sympathy will be felt.
     The funeral services were held Tuesday morning at Ebenezer Church about a half-mile distant from the Evans family home. The attendance was very large, considering the bad weather. Rev. J. M. Davis and Rev. Roland Evans officiated. The pall bearers were David Lloyd, David L. Evans, Charles Swanson, John Deckard, David Hartsook and Roy Mathias. Intermnet by Kerr Butler.

[Note: From stone Born 1832 Died 1916; Buried at Ebenezer, Raccoon]

Gallipolis Journal
March 30, 1916
Transcribed by Charles Wright                                                                       Top of Page


Evans, John

Death of Mr. Evans
     Attorney E.D. Davis received word this morning of the death of his uncle, his mother's brother, Mr. John Evans of Centre Point, this county. He died this morning, October 4, 1910, of a complication of troubles after an illness of two months and aged 66. He is survived by a wife and four daughters. Mrs. Davis of this city, has been out there with him in much of his sickness and had just returned from there. The time for the funeral was not set at this writing, but it is supposed would be day after tomorrow.

[Note: He is buried Tyn Rhos Cemetery and served in Co. C, 173rd Ohio Volunteer Infantry.]

Gallipolis Daily Tribune
October 4, 1910
Transcribed by Henny Evans


Evans, John D.

Death of John Evans
      John Evans residing near the old Holcomb post office in Perry township died Saturday. He was familiarly known as Jack Creek Evans. Mr. Evans was a local politician of some note, an old soldier, jovial in dispositon and was possessed of some property. He left a family.

[Note: From Stone Nebo in Perry]

Gallipolis Journal
May 6, 1914
Transcribed by Charles Wright                                                                       Top of Page


Evans, J. H.

Capt. J. H. Evans Dead
     Relatives and friends in Jackson and Gallia Counties have just received word that Capt. John H. Evans died at his home in Pasadena, Cal., Wednesday, Aug. 20 at the ripe age of 82 years.
     He was the son of Thomas and Margaret Evans of Centreville, Gallia County, Ohio one of the early Welsh settlers and a prominent church-man. Capt. Evans was a highly educated gentleman and in appearance
handsome and striking. During the Civil War he was Captain of the 50th O.V.I. and always took an active interest in the soldiers of that war. He served as Auditor of Gallia County for several terms and was Senator
from the adjoining District of Gallia, Meigs and other river counties.
     He had been in the West for the last 25 years or more and he fully expected to be at the Welsh Centennial Home-coming held at Centreville and Jackson just one year ago this month and his failure to come on account of his age was regretted by all as he was the sole survivor of a large family.
     He leaves four sons and one daughter, all living in the West.
-Jackson Sun

Gallipolis Bulletin
Aug. 28, 1919
No. 36 P. 1
Transcribed by Charles Wright

Evans, John Herbert

     Capt.John Herbert Evans, aged 83, War Veteran, died at his home, East Eighth St., Los Angeles, at 1:00 o'clock p.m., August 19. He was educated at Amhurst College, graduating in the class of 1861. He enlisted at once in the 56th Ohio Volunteer Infantry and served thru the end of the war. At its close, he was elected Auditor of Gallia County, O., which office he served 11 years.  He was then elected to the Ohio State Senate, where he served two terms. Folllowing this he moved to Topeka, Kansas, and retiring from active businessthere 6 years ago, moved to Los Angeles, Cal.
     He is survived by the widow, Mrs. M. Evans, to whom he was married 56 years ago, the ceremony having been solemnized by the Rev. Edward Beecher. Other members of the family are a daughter and four sons, the latter C. of Los Angeles, S. H. of Colorado, __ of Kansas City and J.F of ..ka, Kan., who returned but a few years ago from overseas service as a chaplain.
     The G. A. R. in which organization he had been active, had charge of the service, which was held at the Simpson Chapel Byrum Chapel, with Dr. Geo.Burke  officiating.

[Note from a second obit: son of Thomas and Margaret Evans of Centerville, one of the early Welsh Settlers and a prominent churchman.] 

Gallipolis Bulletin
Sept. 4, 1919
Transcribed by Charles Wright                                                                       Top of Page

Evans, Matthew

Commits Suicide
Matthew Evans of Evergreen Shot Himself Sunday Morning
     Matthew Evans of Evergreen died by his own hand Sunday morning about 5 o'clock from the effects of a revolver shot. He was lying on the floor of his residence at the time and placing the revolver at the back of his head fired, death resulting instantly. He had been in poor health for some time and was about 80 years of age.
     He made his home with his son Alexander and Saturday night a neighbor, Frank Donnally spent the night with them. Mr. Donnally was getting breakfast at the time the suicide occurred and when he reached the old gentleman's side life was extinct. Mr. Evans is survived by two sons and six daughters and was a well respected man.
     The funeral services were held at Fair View church yesterday afternoon at 2 o'clock and were conducted by Rev. R.R. Denney.

[Note: He buried in Fairview/Long Cemetery in Springfield Township. He was a Squirrel Hunter.]

Gallipolis Journal
November 1, 1911
Transcribed by Henny Evans


Ewing, Addison Blair

     Addison Blair Ewing was born in 1821 in Ohio to James and Mary McMillen Ewing. He moved to Iowa by 1850 but returned to marry Mary Terry in Gallia County in 1860. Later in 1860 he was in Hancock County, Illinois. He enlisted from his residence, Basco, Illinois, in January 1862 in Co. G, 12th Illinois Cavalry and was
discharged in October the same year. Addison and Mary had no known children. Addison died June 18, 1880 in Rock Creek Township, Hancock, Illinois.

Created obit from Ewing family research of Nancy Hank Ewing and war records
June 1880
Created by Henny Evans                                                                                 Top of Page


Ewing, Elmore

     Elmore Ewing was born in Gallia County February 16, 1840 to Mr. and Mrs. George Ewing. He died in San Francisco October 21, 1900. He married to Minerva Folsom on September 21, 1864. They had one child Jessie Ewing Stokes. He served as a soldier in Company A, 91st Ohio Volunteer Infantry and suffered a severe wound at Winchester, Virginia. Around the year 1888 he was Department Commander of the Ohio G.A.R. He also wrote the book Bugles and Bells.

Created obit from Ewing family information of Nancy Hank Ewing
1900
Created by Henny Evans


Ewing, Enoch McNeill

     Enoch Ewing was born February 19, 1819 to William and Sarah Mannering Ewing. He married at least twice, once to Salphena Holcomb and later to Phoebe Bowen. He had fifteen children. He lived in Adams County, Ohio where he was a blacksmith. A neighbor reported that he was a stable, healthy fellow, sober and industrious.
     Enoch played the fife in the neighbor's band. The band became a part of Grozier's band which was designated as Company E in West Virginia Volunteer Infantry when the war began. Enoch enlisted in September 1861. Enoch soon contracted typhoid fever and was severely ill. He was sent to the hospital and eventually discharged August 1, 1862.
     By 1866 he was unable to continue blacksmithing due to the effects of the war and moved with his family to Missouri where his boys could farm. In 1870 they moved to Hancock County, Illinois. His aged mother Sarah had joined them in 1867. After Phoebe's death, Enoch went to live with their daughter Julia in Shelbina, Shelby County, Missouri where he died July 6, 1896.

Created obit from Ewing family research of Nancy Hank Ewing and war records
July 1896
Created by Henny Evans


Ewing, George Bowman

     George was born August 17, 1829 in Huntington Township, Gallia County to Abram and Elizabeth Bowman Ewing. He was married twice, first to Emily Wall and second to Lucinda Shields. He enlisted in Co. 103rd Ohio Volunteer Infantry and died at the Post Hospital in Nashville, Tennessee January 12, 1865. He is reported to have been buried in Pine Hill, Springfield Township but another report indicates he was buried in Nashville National Cemetery.

Created obit from Ewing family research of Nancy Hanks Ewing and war records
January 1865
Created by Henny Evans                                                                                Top of Page


Ewing, Gilbert Alexander

     Dr. G.A. Ewing of Jackson, born in this county in 1834, the founder of Ewington Academy,
the husband of Mary Cherrington, and the father of four children, is dead and his funeral services ...

[Note: Gilbert was born in Ewington on May 14, 1834. He was a farmer and a school teacher and then studied medicine under Dr. Ira Holcomb. He served in Co. A, 156th Ohio Volunteer Infantry as a Hospital Steward on the Field and Staff and his wife Mary was a Civil War nurse. He is buried in Fairmount Cemetery in Jackson County,
Ohio.].

Gallipolis Daily Tribune and records from Nancy Hank Ewing research
August 22, 1906
Transcribed by Henny Evans


Ewing, James King

     James was born in Ewington, Gallia County August 15, 1844. He became a skilled carpenter. He enlisted in Co. E, 27th Ohio Volunteer Infantry and re-enlisted in Co. G, 4th U.S.V.V. Infantry. He had typhoid, exposure, impure water and impaired hearing issues during the war. After the war he moved to Hancock County, Illinois. In 1876 he married in Reno County, Kansas to Mary Kinney but they were still listed in Illinois census records. In 1883 they moved to the state of Washington. James died May 14, 1917 in Seattle and is buried in the GAR Cemetery near there.

Created obit from Ewing family research of Nancy Hanks Ewing and war records
May 1917
Created by Henny Evans


Ewing, James Robert

     James Robert Ewing was born in July 1821 to William and Sarah Mannering Ewing in Huntington Township, Gallia County, Ohio. He married Eliza McMillin in 1843. By 1850 they lived in Jackson County where James was listed as a carpenter. They had two children, Louise and Hiram.
     On September 3, 1861 James enlisted in the 11th Independent Battery, Ohio Light Artillery and served
though November 5, 1864. They moved to Illinois in 1866 where in 1888 he applied for a pension. They then moved to Shelby County, Alabama to be near a daughter. James died April 27, 1901 and is buried in Wilsonville Cemetery in Shelby County, Alabama.

Created obit from Ewing family research of Nancy Hank Ewing and war records
April 1901
Created by Henny Evans                                                                                Top of Page


Ewing, John

     John Ewing was born April 21, 1841 in Addison Township to Samuel and Elizabeth Jones Ewing. His
mother died when he was eight and his father moved the family to Van Buren County, Iowa where he died in 1855.
     John left to search for gold in California and stayed with it for five years until the Civil War started. He enlisted in 1861 in Captain Moses A. McLaughlin's Company D, 2nd California Cavalry Volunteers. His three year enlistment turned into three months after he developed epilepsy and was ordered discharged.
     John returned to Iowa for a visit at this time and on the return trip to California he disappeared never to be heard from by family members again.

Created obit from Nancy Hank Ewing research and soldier records
Suspected 1862
Created by Henny Evans


Ewing, John A.

     John was born October 29, 1836 in Huntington Township, Gallia county to John J. and Elizabeth Viers
Ewing. He moved with his family to Missouri about 1856. He enlisted in Co. C, 27th Missouri Infantry. He was given a medical discharge due to problems with his left tibia in 1863.
     He married Evaline Gardner in Missouri about 1870. They had two children, William and Georgia. He died
in a tragic accident when he was hunting and fell from a tree stump which caused the gun to fire and shoot him in the chest. It also created a fire and he was burned badly. They buried him on the spot in Adair County, Missouri. This was about 1878 or 1879 but before 1880.

Created obit from Ewing family research of Nancy Hank Ewing and war records
1878-1879
Created by Henny Evans


Ewing, John R.   

     EWING - At Ewington, Gallia county, Ohio, May 1st, 1869, John R. Ewing, a well-known citizen of Huntington township, son of George and Ann Ewing; aged 37 years and 21 days. John was a sufferer for 14 months with Consumption of the lungs, which baffled the skill of his physicians and many of the popular remedies of the day.  He bore his illness patiently and peacefully and with Christian fortitude. He died calmly and peacefully, without a struggle or a moan. He leaves a widow and five small children to mourn his loss.  

[Note: Buried in Ewington Cemetery in Huntington Township.]  

Gallipolis Journal
May 6, 1869
Vol. XXXIV   No. 25 
Transcribed by Charles Wright                                                                       Top of Page


Ewing, Jordan

     Jordan Ewing was born in 1844 to Enoch and Salphena Holcomb Ewing. He served in Co. E, 53rd Ohio
Volunteer Infantry from 1861 to 1864 and then reenlisted in Co. E, 185th Ohio Volunteer Infantry from February to September 1865.
     He married in 1866 to Sarah Hutson/Huston in Vinton County. If they had children they are not known. He died in the Soldiers and Sailors Home in Dayton, Ohio December 22, 1926 and is buried at the Dayton National Cemetery in Dayton, Montgomery County, Ohio.

Created obit from Ewing family research of Nancy Hank Ewing and war records
December 1926
Created by Henny Evans


Ewing, Joseph Henry

     Joseph H. Ewing was born June 10, 1840 to Abram and Elizabeth Bowman Ewing in Huntington Township,
Gallia County.He died December 12, 1861 from disease at Summerville, Virginia. He had enlisted in Co. B, 36th Ohio Volunteer Infantry on August 12 and died just three months later. His parents later received his pension.
     He is buried in Alexandria National Cemetery in Alexandria, Virginia.

Created obit from Ewing family research of Nancy Hank Ewing and war records
December 1861
Created by Henny Evans


Ewing, Levi Curtis

     Levi was born September 19, 1841 in Ewington, Ohio to Enoch Ewing. At the age of 21 he enlisted in Co.
B, 36th Ohio Volunteer Infantry on August 12, 1861. In March 1863 he married Eliza Ann McManus in Vinton, Gallia County. Their son Levi was born in 1864 while he was away at war. They had ten children and by 1880 they lived in Lawrence County, Ohio where his occupation was given as "charcoal coaling". They then returned to Jackson County where Eliza died in 1891.
     He remarried to Mary Jones in 1892. Levi died September 20, 1908 and is buried in Fairmount Cemetery in
Jackson County, Ohio.

Created obit from research of Nancy Hank Ewing and war records
September 1908
Created by Henny Evans                                                                                Top of Page


Ewing, Mary B.

Last Surviving Southern Ohio Civil War Nurse Dies
     Mrs. Mary B. Ewing, age 97, a Civil War nurse and widow of a Civil War surgeon, is dead at her home in Wellston. Mrs. Ewing was a cousin of President Abraham Lincoln, her grandmother, Margaret Hanks, being a sister of Nancy Hanks, mother of Lincoln.
     Mrs. Ewing was the widow of Dr. G. A. Ewing, who died many years ago. Married before the Civil War, both Dr. and Mrs. Ewing enlisted for service. Dr. Ewing joined the medical staff of the 156th O.V.I. and Mrs. Ewing went to Cincinnati as a nurse, taking with her their first child, then two years old. She was the last surviving Civil War nurse living in Southern Ohio.
     Mrs. Ewing, was the eldest child of Mr. & Mrs. Levi Cherrington and was born several miles east of Centerville, Gallia County, in a log cabin. She had two brothers and a sister, all of whom are dead and her mother was one of 19 children, Mrs. Ewing was the mother of four children, three sons and a daughter, all of whom are now dead, except one son, Dr. U.S. Grant Ewing, who resides in Richmond, VA.
     Funeral Services were held today in Jackson.

[Note: Death Certificate: Mary Ewing born Sept. 10, 1839; died July 25, 1937 in Jackson, Ohio...97 years, 10 months and 10 days of age. Husband was Dr. Gilbert A. Ewing. Parents were Levi Cherrington and Permelia Mannering.]

Gallipolis Paper
July 1937
Transcribed by F.K. Brown

Ewing, Mary B. (Cherrington)

Noted Woman is Taken by Death
     Mrs. Mary B. Ewing, 97, a Civil War nurse and widow of a Civil War surgeon, is dead at her home in Wellston. Mrs. Ewing was a cousin of President Abraham Lincoln, her grandmother, Margaret Hanks, being a sister of Nancy Hanks, mother of Lincoln.
     Mrs. Ewing was the widow of Dr. G.A. Ewing, long deceased. Married before the Civil War, both enlisted for service. Dr. Ewing joined the medical staff of the 156th O.V.I., and Mrs. Ewing went to Cincinnati as a nurse, taking with her their first child, two years of age. She is the last Civil War nurse in Southern Ohio.
     Mrs. Ewing was the oldest child of Mr. and Mrs. Levi Cherrington and was born two and a half miles east of Centerville in Gallia County in a log cabin. She had two brothers and a sister, all deceased, and her mother was one of 19 children. Mrs. Ewing had four children, three sons and a daughter. All are deceased save a son, Dr. U.S. Grant Ewing, residing in Richmond Va.
     Funeral services were held Wednesday in Jackson.

The Gallia Times, p. 1
July 29, 1937
Transcribed by Deanna Partlow


Ewing, Thomas Jefferson

     Thomas was born July 26, 1838 in Ewington, Gallia County to John and Elizabeth Viers Ewing. He enlisted in Co. B, 36th Ohio Volunteer Infantry and was killed at the Battle of Cedar Creek October 19, 1864. He is buried at Winchester National Cemetery in Winchester, Virginia.

Created obit from research of Nancy Hanks Ewing and war records
October 1864
Created by Henny Evans


Ewing, Thomas Shelby

     Thomas S. Ewing was born February 28, 1837 in Addison Township to Samuel and Elizabeth Jones
Ewing. He moved with his family to Van Buren County, Iowa and by 1860 had moved to Mahaska County, Iowa where he worked on a farm. The family has a picture of him in his Civil War uniform and it is reported that he served all four years but no official record of his service has been found. In 1879 he married Mary Overman and by 1900 they had moved to Wapello County, Iowa. Thomas died there September 9, 1911.

Created obit from Nancy Hank Ewing research and family picture
September 9, 1911
Created by Henny Evans


Ewing, William

     William Ewing was born February 26, 1823 in Huntington Township, Gallia County. He married August 1, 1847 to Mary M. White. William's father was William Ewing who served in the War of 1812 and his grandfather was William Ewing, Revolutionary War soldier. William and Mary lived in Gallia County and then for a time lived in Jackson County before moving back to Gallia.
     At the age of 39, in August 1862, he enlisted in Co. K, 91st Ohio Volunteer Infantry. He was discharged for disability in November 1863. He was a member of the Grand Army of the Republic and joined the Shenefield Post No. 734 at Ewington.
     William and Mary had 11 children, six sons and five daughters. They were James L, Anetta Jane,, Agnes Ellen, Mary Jeanet, Wilmuth L., Dora, Amos, William Harold, Andrew Elmer, John W. and unnamed daughter who died in infancy. After Mary died in 1892 William chose to live with his daughter Jennie (Mary Jeanet Ewing Sweeney), and moved to Cherokee County, Kansas.
     William died at Weir City, Kansas, April 15, 1899. His obit said, "Mr. Ewing had been in rather poor health for the past two years, but his disease did not assume a serious turn until about 4 in the morning. He grew
steadily worse until death ended his suffering at 5:30." He was buried at Hosey Hill Cemetery in Weir City, Kansas.

Created obit from Nancy Hank Ewing research and partial obit from "The Modern Light"
1899
Created by Henny Evans                                                                               Top of Page


Ewing, William Allen

     William was born February 11, 1842 in Ewington, Gallia County to John and Elizabeth Viers Ewing. He moved to Missouri when a young man and married Sarah Reynolds there in 1867. Sarah died after they had 4 children and he married again to Nicinda Martin and they had 4 more children.
He reportedly served with his 4 brothers in the Civil War but his records have not been found. William died in 1922 and is buried in Pleasant Home Cemetery in Worthington, Putnam County, Missouri.

Created obit from research of Nancy Hanks Ewing and war records
1922
Created by Henny Evans


Farley, Charles W.

     Charles W. Farley, Private, aged 24, enlisted Aug. 4th, 1861, from Guyan township, died of chronic diarrhea at Camp Sherman, Miss., Aug. 24th, 1863, leaving a widow and two children.

[Note: The above is taken from a list of those who died in the war. He served in Co. G, 4th West Virginia Volunteer Infantry. This regiment was in Virginia in August of 1863, so the date and circumstance of death reported here are almost certainly incorrect, probably mixed up with another soldier's information on the submitted list. His widow got a pension starting in Jan 1864]

The Gallipolis Journal
September 21, 1865
Transcribed by Eva Swain Hughes                                                                    Top of Page


Farley, Merida

     Merida Farley, Private, aged 22, enlisted Aug. 4th, 1861, from Guyan township, killed at Vicksburg, Miss., May 19th, 1863—unmarried.

[Note: The above is taken from a list of those who died in the war. He served in Co. G, 4th West Virginia Infantry.]

The Gallipolis Journal
September 21, 1865
Transcribed by Eva Swain Hughes


Fellure, Nicholas

Death of Nicholas Fellure
     Mr. Nicholas Fellure, died at the Farmer’s Hotel with heart trouble, Monday night, at the age of 81 years.  Mr. Fellure was a Civil War veteran and had been in good health and ate a good supper and died while seated at the table.
     He leaves one daughter, Mrs. Hoadley Lear of Angel, and four sons, Delbert of Crown City, Marion of Winfield, W.Va., Gordon and Chauncy of Springfield.
     The body was taken to the Geo. Wetherholts and Sons undertakers parlors and no funeral arrangements have been made.

Gallipois Daily Tribune
Jan. 27, 1925
Transcribed by Henny Evans                                                                        Top of Page


Fellure, Thomas

Thomas Fellure, 83, Civil War Vet, Dies
     Thomas Fellure, aged 83, a life long resident of Gallia county, and one of the few remaining Civil War veterans of the county, was found dead in his bed Sunday morning, at his home on Garfield avenue, having passed away some time during the night. While Mr. Fellure had been in failing health for some time he seemed as well as usual upon retiring Saturday night. Two brothers, Joseph of Indiana, and Jesse,of this city and several grandchildren survive. Since the death of his wife last March, he has been tenderly cared for by his niece, Mrs. Luther Massie and Mr. Massie.
     Funeral services will be conducted by Rev. Porter, Tuesday, at 2 p.m. at Siloam Church with burial in the Fellure cemetery near there in charge of A.E. Tope.

[Note: He served in Co. F, 33rd OVI.]

Gallipolis Daily Tribune
October 28, 1929
Transcribed by Henny Evans

Ferguson, John C.

     John C. Ferguson, son of Isaac and Patience Ferguson, was born near Steubenville, Ohio,Feb. 1, 1835, and departed this life at his home in Porter, Ohio, Feb. 17, 1925, aged 90 years and 16 days.
     He was united in marriage to Susan Shaver Jan. 7, 1869, and to this union were born three children, two daughters, Mrs. Louie Roush of Gallipolis, Ohio, Mrs. Annie Topping of Porter, Ohio, and one son John of near Porter. Besides his wife and children he leaves to mourn their loss seven grand children and three great-grand children, one brother, Samuel Ferguson of Windsor, Mo., and one sister, Mrs. Louisa McCall of McCall, Idaho, and a host of relatives and friends to mourn their loss.
     He united with the Campaign F.W.B. Church in the year 1862, and remained a faithful member until death. He was a soldier of the Civil war, and served in Co. D, 148th Regiment, Illinois Infantry. He was a true brave soldier, faithful to every duty. He was a kind and devoted companion, a loving and indulgent father, a good and self- sacrificing neighbor and will be greatly missed. But all are comforted in the truth that he believed that "because Jesus Christ lives he shall live also."
     Funeral services were at Porter M.E. Church.

[Note: He is buried in Fairview/Long Cemetery in Springfield Township. Military records show an alias for him as John Carman and that is how he is found in the database. Perhaps this was his middle name and was mistakenly used.]

Gallia Times
March 5, 1925
Transcribed by Henny Evans


Fierbaugh, John

John Fierbaugh Dead
     John Fierbaugh, 77, a well known old soldier of the Northup neighborhood, passed away Wednesday after an extended illness.  He is survived by his sons and daughters, Millie, Ella, Lydia, Sophia, Nace and Clyde.  His wife has been dead a number of years.
     The funeral was conducted Friday at Centenary in Green township.  

[Note: From stone:  Born Feb. 17, 1843    Died Jan 14, 1920]
 
The Gallia Times
Jan. 21, 1920 


Transcribed by Charles Wright                                                                       Top of Page


Fierbaugh, Robert

Rev. Fierbaugh Dead
     Rev. Robert Fierbaugh, a former resident of Gallipolis, died at his home in Henderson, Monday afternoon, October 23, after a long illness with kidney trouble. He was born in this county in Jan. 1843.. He served in the civil war.  He was a member of the Christian Church for 45 years and lived a cheerful, helpful life. He left a devoted wife, three sons, George of Charleston, John of Winfield, Harry of Henderson, three daughters, Mrs. Burks of Henderson, Mrs.  Coles of Charleston, and Mrs. Hicks of Winfield.  

[Note: From stone:  Died 1911]  

Gallipolis Bulletin
Nov. 2, 1911 
Transcribed by Charles Wright


Fife, George Adam

Resolutions
Resolutions of respect by "Shiloh" Circle No. 21, Ladies G.A.R.

Whereas, In the providence of God, whose nature is love, and all whose acts are done in
wisdom, and for our highest good, who has taken from us our beloved brother, George A. Fife.
Resolved, That we bow in humble submission to his will, who doeth all things well.
Resolved, That this circle extend to the bereaved family their earnest sympathy and
love, in their great affliction. Carolne Boice,
     Pres. Frances A. Boatman, Secy.
[Note: He served in Co. I, 4th WV Infantry and is buried Poplar Ridge Cemetery in Cheshire Township. He died August 9, 1895 at the age of 73.]

Gallipolis Journal
August 21, 1895
Transcribed by Henny Evans                                                                           Top of Page


Fife, Joseph Warren

Death of J.W. Fife of Addison
     Joseph Warren Fife died at his home at Addison, O., Friday morning, Sept. 7, 1923 at 5:15 o'clock. About eight weeks ago he suffered a paralytic stroke from which he never recovered. The deceased was a son of George A. and Margaret Ann Rowley Fife and was born in this county March 8, 1846.
     When sixteen years of age he enlisted in the service of his country as a private in Company A, 94th O.V.I. later re-enlisting in Company G 13th West Virginia Infantry in which he served until the close of the war. He leaves to mourn his loss a wife and ten children all of whom are of an adult age. Also two brothers and three sisters. He was a member of the M.E. Church for perhaps fifty years. Was characterized by all who knew him as an upright and thoroughly patriotic citizen.
     The funeral services will be held Sunday at 2 p.m. from the Addison M.E. conducted by Rev. L.C. Shaver. The burial will follow at Gravel Hill under the direction of Wetherholt & Entsminger.

Gallipolis Daily Tribune
September 8, 1923
Transcribed by Henny Evans


Fife, Matthias A. 

Old Soldier Taken
     Matthias A. Fife, aged 74, a veteran of the Civil War, died at Kanauga Friday, Aug. 31. The funeral was held Sunday afternoon in Middleport, his former home. Mr. Fife was a well known old gentleman who had made his home for several years with his sister, Mrs. Clara Vance, at Kanauga. He had been in failing health for some time.

[Note: Co. H, 53rd O.V.I.]

The Gallia Times
Sept. 5, 1917 
Transcribed by Charles Wright                                                                       Top of Page


Fillinger, Andrew J.

     Head-quarters, 18th Ohio Battery, Moccasin Point, opposite Lookout Mountain, Tenn., Oct. 23d
At retreat parade today, Capt. Aleshire announced the death of Andrew J. Fillinger, of Gallia county, O., who was mortally wounded on the 20th day of September, 1863, at the battle of Chickamauga, while nobly standing at his post, serving ammunition for his gun; whereupon the Company immediately assembled at the Quarters of Lt. Bierce, and appointed the following Committee to draft resolutions with a view of paying appropriate honors to the memory of a worthy soldier, and C. O. Curtis, John P. Amos and John Peters were appointed. The Committee reported the following resolutions, which were unanimously adopted:
Whereas, it has pleased Almighty God, in His wisdom, to remove from among us our friend and brother, Andrew J. Fillinger, a member of the 18th Ohio Battery;
Resolved, that in his death, the Company has lost a brave soldier, ever faithful and at his post. He was kind and affable to all around him;
Resolved, that the officers and members of the Battery, tender their unfeigned sympathy to the bereaved parents and relations of the heroic dead;
Resolved, that a copy of these proceedings be recorded in the records of the Battery, and published in the Gallipolis papers.
      John P. Amos, Chairman; C. O. Curtis, Secretary

The Gallipolis Journal
November 12, 1863
Transcribed by Eva Swain Hughes


Fillinger, Jonathan

Funeral Services
     The funeral services of the late Jonathan Fillinger took place at his late home at Crown City at 9 o'clock Monday morning conducted by Rev. John L. Porter. After the services the body was taken over to Dickey Chapel at Lincoln, 10 miles away and after brief services at the grave, was interred. Mr. Fillinger left one brother, a wife, four sons and five daughters all of adult age.

[Note: He served in Co. G, 117th O.V.I. and Co. G, 1st O.V.H.A.]

Gallipolis Daily Tribune
February 16, 1909
Transcribed by Henny Evans


Fillmore, Wesley D.

Obituary
     Wesley D. Fillmore, died May 4th, 1862, aged 19 years and 1 month, at the Military Hospital, Warrenton Junction, VA. Wesley was a native of Gallia county, O. Was a volunteer soldier in the 12th Indiana regiment, whose term of enlistment expired 2 days after his decease.

ALONE!
     A stranger's hand will trace no name upon the polished marble. Alone-Was he not alone? No dear friend to soothe his dying brow! Alone! No friend to hear his last farewell. We know that gentle eyes looked from above with pity on him. Angels in their love went with him. Being far from home, neighbors, friends or kindred, strangers do what remains to be done. They make him a grave, and with little sympathy they view the bold, beautiful face, the high, broad brow with chilled lips, and slowly and sadly they lower the breathless form to its cold lone home. I hear one say: Mayest thou have a home in heaven, dear friend, we know then art not lost, dear lovely friend. And now each fellow soldier returns to his post, and the thought lingers upon the mind, where is Wesley? Alone! There he lies alone in a land of strangers. Alas! alas!! When the news of his death reaches his home and a large circle of friends and relatives there must be sorrow and mourning, for all were in expectancy of meeting in a few days. Those friends will miss him here, but they will meet in heaven.

A. FRIEND

[Note: Stone--born 1843-Stone Mound Hill..burial- Unknown]

Gallipolis Journal
June 5, 1862 Vol. XXVII
Transcribed by Charles Wright                                                                       Top of Page


Finch, Andrew J.

Death of Andrew Finch
     We copy the following from the Danville (Ill.) News. Mr. Finch was formerly a resdient of Gallia County and has many friends and relatives here.
     On Thursday evening, May 4th, as John Selsor, Andrew Finch and J.M. Goff were coming home from church, about one and a half miles southwest of Bixby, when in about one hundred yards of Finch's house they were all three struck by lightning, killing Mr. Finch and Mr. Goff and seriously injuring Mr. Selsor. Mr. Goff seemed to realize the hardest blow. It struck him over the left temple tearing his clothes almost completely to pieces, and also tore both shoes to pieces. Mr. Selsor was struck on the left arm tearing his coat sleeve into fragments, passing down his left leg it tore bits of flesh out, and also tore his left boot to pieces, and tore one side out of his right boot as it passed to the earth. Finch was carrying a lantern and had one shoe torn to pieces, which was all the mark he had upon him.
     Mr. Selsor was between the two men who were killed, and says that he saw the lightning coming, knew they were struck, and remembers of falling, but don't know how long he lay unconscious; but he thinks not very long. When he came to his clothes were on fire and he put them out. Goff was lying across his thighs. He says that Finch breathed some ten minutes after he (Selsor) came to before he died. They were all three lying on their faces. Mr. Selsor had no use of but one arm, and with that he managed to drag himself to the house and told Mr. Finch's woman, when assistance was called and the other two men were brought to the house. Mr. Selsor was then taken home, Dr. Vredingburg was called and his wounds were dressed.
     Mr. Finch was between fifty and sixty years of age, has been a member of the M.E. Church for about five years, and was well thought of by all his neighbors.

[Note: He served as a Squirrel Hunter. He married Mary Ann Switzer in Gallia County in 1856.]

Gallipolis Journal
June 8, 1882
Transcribed by Henny Evans


Finley, Alexander

Found Dead
Was Alexander Finley Living on the John Graham Farm
     Alexander Finley, ages 73, was found dead in bed this (Wednesday) morning in an outbuilding on the Bill Graham farm at Raccoon Island. Finley was employed on the Graham farm and slept in the outbuilding to be near his work as he made his home at other times with a son on Teen's Run. He leaves two sons and two daughters. Coroner Hanson went down and viewed the remains and pronounced the cause of death as heart failure.

[Note: He is buried in Clay Chapel Cemetery, Oct. 9, 1847-Sept. 29, 1920. The name was spelled Findlay in this article but was changed to Finley to match his death record and the census.]

Gallipolis Daily Tribune
September 29, 1920
Transcribed by Henny Evans                                                                          Top of Page


Finley, John

Death of John Finley
The Eureka Helper, published by Rev. H. E. Brill, pastor of Eureka charge of Gallipolis M. E. Church contains the following:
     On Monday afternoon, May 9, John Finley of Clay Chapel, peacefully breathed out his life surrounded by those who had so long and kindly sought in vain to arrest the hand of the destroyer. His illness began with the year, and in spite of all that kind friends and physicians could do the disease continued to advance until he was wasted to a skeleton and over-burdened nature yielded.
     He united with the church here under the ministry of Bro. Crooks, Feb. 25, 1883; was baptized and received into full membership the following September. He was born in Westmoreland Co., Va., Jan. 13, 1839, hence was aged fifty-nine years, three months, and twenty-six days.
     On the 15th day of July, 1861, he was united in marriage with Miss Caroline Danforth, at Gallipolis. Then came to gladden their home seven daughters, and three sons, in this order: Sarah, now deceased; Cora, now Mrs. Wm. Tilton; Lizzie, now Mrs. Sidney Root of Addison; Belle, now Mrs. Lawson Chevelier of Angola; Ella, deceased, Eva, now Mrs. Edward Burnette of Huntington, John Henry, George Alexander, at home; Jessie, deceased; and Eddie, at home.
     The deceased was a member of Co. E 141st O. V. I. commanded by Capt. Samuel Rothgeb.

[Note: Buried Clay Chapel in Clay]

Gallipolis Journal
May 10, 1898
Transcribed by Charles Wright


First, John Wesley

     John Wesley First, born Dec. 17, 1833, and died Oct. 18, 1925, age 91 years, 10 months and one day.
He was united in marriage to Hannah Salser March 4, 1859, and to this union one daughter was born. His wife died in the year 1862.
     In 1866 on May 17, he was united in marriage to Clara Saulser [sic]. To this union were eight children were born. His wife and three children have preceded him. In 1907 he was united in marriage to Sarah Mink, who died in June 1911.
     He joined the Baptist church when quite young. In 1888 he moved his membership to the Bulaville Christian church and remained a member of that church until death. His last sickness was of only four days duration. He bore his sufferings without murmur or complaint. All was done that could be done to relieve his suffering but God thought best to remove him from us and he passed peacefully away. Having completed his labors here, has has passed through the portals of eternity and entered into that mansion of New Jerusalem,and hath received as his reward a crown and where as the all-wise and merciful Master of the universe has left us here to recall the memories of the past, He tells us in the book of all books that "the darkest hour is just before the dawn."
poem follows

Card of Thanks
     We take this means of publicly thanking our many loyal friends and neighbors who came to our assistance and rendered so many acts of kindness through the sickness and death of our dear father, to Rev. W.J. Fulton for his tender words of sympathy and comfort, and to LJ. Coleman for his courteous service as undertaker.
     Mrs. Eunice Bing, Mrs. Lillian Glassburn, Mrs. Ella Rife.

[Note: He served as a Squirrel Hunter.]

Gallipois Daily Tribune
October 1925
Transcribed by Henny Evans


Flack, Friend C.

     Friend C. Flack, stricken with paralysis at the home of Capt. and Mrs. T.W. Thorniley at Raccoon Island, died at 3 o'clock Tuesday afternoon, aged sixty four. He was a son of Mr. and Mrs. James Flack and until his health became impaired about four months ago, tilled the soil, being one of the esteemed farmers of Clay township.
     He was born and raised in this county and a gentleman who to know him was to like him. Lately he has been making his home with his sisters, Mrs. Elza Smith, of this city, and Mrs. F.W. Thorniley, of Raccoon Island. Burial was at Clay Chapel Thursday morning at 11 o'clock, Rev. Brill officiating at the services. The many friends of the deceased share with the sisters in their affliction.

[Note: He served as a Squirrel Hunter; b. 1832 d. 1896.]

Gallipolis Journal
November 3, 1896
Transcribed by Henny Evans                                                                          Top of Page


Fleishman, August

Hospital Patient Killed by Train

     August Fleishman, a patient at the O.H.E., was struck by a local freight on the Hocking Valley tracks near Fox's Dairy Wednesday afternoon and instantly killed. He had gotten away from the Hospital and wandered out in the country. He was a veteran of the Civil War and was about 68 years old. He was sent here from Auglaize County about 5 years ago, but had also been an inmate of the Ohio Soldiers' and Sailors' Home at Sandusky. He left a wife and family and the remains were shipped to a daughter living near Cleveland, Ohio.

Gallipolis Bulletin
July 1, 1910
Transcribed by Henny Evans


Fogg, Cecil

     Cecil Fogg was born in Salem Center, Meigs County December 7, 1842. He enlisted in Co. B, 36th Ohio Volunteer Infantry. He was wounded severely in his arm and became a POW, but was not discharged
until the end of the war.
     In 1869 he married Victoria Holcomb and they had three children. By 1878 they had moved to Vinton. He died April 26, 1882 and is buried in Holcomb Cemetery in Huntington Township.

Created obit from Nancy Hank Ewing research and service records
April 1882
Created by Henny Evans


Folden, Francis M.

Sudden Death
F. M. Folden Stricken Without Warning Friday.
     Mr. Francis M. Folden, a fine old gentleman and soldier of Capt. W. S. Matthews Company in the Civil War in the First Ohio Heavy Artillery, living on Garfield Avenue on the former Alex Keller place which he bought after selling his farm in Walnut Township, died immediately after dinner today, age about 70 years.
     He had been to town in the forenoon and eaten his dinner when he complained of not feeling well and sat down on the side of the bed, and as they were about to call a physician fell over dead. He was a good citizen with lots of friends. He leaves a widow with maiden name was Dickey and one child, a daughter, Miss Althea, stenographer in Ward Bros. Insurance Office. We have no futher particulars today, but expect to have tomorrow.

Gallipolis Daily Tribune
Volume XVIII
Number 47
February 23, 1912
Gallipolis, Ohio

Transcribed By: MLT                                                                                     Top of Page


Force, Joseph L.   [Not an actual obituary, but since one was not available, this is presented.]

Guarded Morgan on Way to Prison
Joseph L. Force, 85, Civil War Veteran, Tells Some of His Experiences

POMEROY - May 22
     Joseph L. Force, a Civil War veteran of Thurman?, was in the Courthouse here yesterday afternoon to have his automobile license transferred from West Virginia to Ohio. He was an original Gallia Countian, and for many years was in the Navy after the close of the Civil War in which he served from beginning to end. One of his military experiences was guarding the raider, John Morgan, after his capture in July, 1863, en route to the Ohio Penitentiary, from which Morgan later escaped.
     Mr. Force spends his winters in Florida, having returned from there recently. While waiting for the transfer he told of being photographed with a Confederate soldier in Georgia last winter and he recited an original poem composed by himself which appeared under the illustration of himself and Confederate friend.
     "My name is Force." said he as he picked up his papers and walked out, "but I'm not much force. My grandfathers reached over 100 years each, but I do not to expect to reach that age. When I went to Florida last fall I had rheumatism so badly that I could not get my coat on without help, now see what I can do." and he raised his arms above his head and waved them about freely.

[Note: Joseph L. Force is buried in Pine Street Cemetery in Gallipolis Township. There is no birth date on the stone but from the census and the above article it should be about 1845. His mother Esther and sister Elizabeth also are buried at Pine Street. He served in Co. A, 15 Missouri Regiment.]

Athens Messenger
May 22, 1930
Transcribed by Henny Evans from a Martha Sargent copy


Ford, H. N.

H. N. Ford Passes
Former Citizen of Gallipolis Dead at Eight-Seven.
     Mr. H. N. Ford, helpless for years with paralysis, died at Charleston, Friday night at the advanced age of 87. His remains will arrive here Monday, and funeral services will be held at 2 P. M. The same day at St. Peter's Church after which internment will be made at Mound Hill by Hayward.
     Mrs. Ford died a little over a year ago. The surviving children are Mrs. W. B. Shober, Mrs. Earl Bowyer, and Miss Bird Ford, all of Charleston, W. Va.
     Mr. Ford was for many years a contractor and builder in this City in a partnership with his brother T. S. Ford. Together they owned and operated a planning mill at the foot of Third Avenue. Their most considerable structure in Gallipolis is the Court House.
     A few years ago Mr. and Mrs. Ford gave up their residence in Gallipolis to be with children in Charleston, where their declining years were made as pleasant and happy as possible, considering their informities. The death of Mr. Ford closes the record for one generation of the family once prominent in the affairs of this City.

Gallipolis Daily Tribune
Volume XXIV
Number 23
January 26, 1918
Gallipolis, Ohio

Transcribed By: MLT                                                                                      Top of Page


Fox, Jacob

          Died, at Johnsonville, Tenn., March 3d, 1865, of typhoid fever, Jacob Fox of the 173d O.V.I., aged 20 years, five months, and 21 days. Only son of Phillip Fox of Raccoon township, Gallia county Ohio. He leaves a large circle of friends and acquaintances by whom he was loved and respected, to mourn his death. He was a good soldier, done [sic] his duty well, and sealed his devotion to his country with his life.
    
Another brave has gone to rest,
Another spirit fled;
A victim of unholy strife,
Lies numbered with the dead.

Then parents dear for him don't grieve,
But let your tears be dried,
Your son a noble deed hath done,
He for his country died. Com.

[Note: He has a stone at Sanctuary in RA but it says he is bur. Nashville Nat. Cem. on AMCW data base. His father received his pension May 13, 1890.]

The Gallipolis Journal
March 23, 1865
Transcribed by Eva Swain Hughes


Fraley, G.W.

G. W. Fraley Dead
     G. W. Fraley of Mercerville passed away Monday night. He was a fine old man and a veteran of the Civil War and was about 75 years of age. His wife died about a year ago and since that time he has been living with his son Emmett. One son is an attendant at the O. H. E. , John; still another lives at Mercerville. Mrs. John Bostick a daughter lives at Crown City.

[Note: Stone. Born Nov. 15, 1840 Died Dec. 11, 1911. Buried Mercerville, Guyan Twp.]

Gallipolis Bulletin
Dec. 14, 1911
Transcribed by Charles Wright                                                                            Top of Page


Franklin, James

Death by Accidental Shooting
     A sad accident occurred at Hanly's Landing, W. Va., Saturday evening resulting in the death of James Franklin, of Clay township, this county. The facts connected with the unfortunate occurrence, as we have them from an eye witness, are as follows:
     A large crowd had assembled to witness a foot race that was run between Wm. Brown of Mason County, W. Va., and John Sowards of this county for $150 a side. The race went off about 1 o'clock, peaceably and satisfactorily, Brown winning. After the race the largest part of the crowd went to the river at Hanly's Store, and was, as usual, talking over matters generally until night. About dark a party of Virginians that had been playing a game of cards, wanted to get some whiskey of Gus Hanly, who refused to furnish it, whereupon one of the party, by the name of Andy Jordan, threatened to whip Gus Hanly, and offered 3 dollars to any party who would whip Gus. Ithamar Boston, from the Ohio side, being present, and being a friend of Gus Hanly, interfered and tried to get Jordan and his party to go away, whereupon Jordan attacked him.
     Col. J.H.M. Montgomery, who was then under the river bank on his way home, hearing Boston's voice in the difficulty, and Boston having worked in his cooper shop for the past two years, naturally went back to see what was going on, and, if possible, to stop the disturbance. Arriving on the ground just about the time that Jordan struck Boston, Montgomery rushed in and tried to scatter them. Kicking one or two to no purpose, he drew his revolver and cried out to them to stand back and not touch Boston. At this moment James Franklin, the deceased, one of Montgomery's best friends, and also a friend of Boston, rushed in and caught the revolver and tried to jerk it out of Montgomery's hands. Jerking the muzzle toward his own breast, the revolver went off, shooting Franklin through the heart, killing him almost instantly.
     Franklin had been one of Col. Montgomery's best soldiers during the war, going out in the old company in 1861, as a private and returning in 1865 [as an] Orderly Sergeant, and a friend that the colonel loved as he loved himself. An inquest was held before Esquire Parmley, of Ohio Township, and the jury returned a verdict of accidental shooting. It was a sad unfortunate affair, and we are sure no one regrets it more that Col. Montgomery.

[Note: James Franklin, a veteran of the 33rd OVI, was the first husband of Martha Jane Holsten. The widow became the wife of John McKean, another 33rd veteran, and were my grandparents- John A. McKean.]

[Note: This transcription was previously typed and placed in the Simmerman files, James Franklin file, with a note that it was contributed by Jean Rubenstal. At the top it is written Gallipolis Journal, March 5, 1870. There is a James Franklin, Civil War soldier, buried at Bethel CE with a death date of May 7, 1870.]

Transcribed from previous transcription by Lynn Anders

[Another transcription typed from a microfilm of the original by Eva Swain Hughes, gave the date of the Journal as March 10. The date of death on the tombstone says May 7, 1870, but this is likely a transcription error with the actual date of death being March 7, 1870. N. Elvick]
                                                                                                                       Top of Page


Franklin, John

John Franklin Dies in Columbus
Formerly Police Officer Here
     John Franklin, aged 90, Union soldier and former police officer here, died yesterday at his rooms in the New Bryden Hotel, East Town street, Columbus. Funeral services will be held in Columbus late this afternoon and burial will be made here at 2 o'clock Monday. Another Union veteran, Oliver T. Cheney, 92, died
in Columbus at about the same time that Mr. Franklin passed away.
     Mr. Franklin was captured with 11,000 other northern soldiers at Harpers Ferry by Stonewall Jackson, but was returned to the Union Army in an exchange of troops. He made his home at the New Bryden Hotel for the last 20 years. A sister, Mrs. Virginia Cunningham, 1421 1/2 Cole St., survives
him.

[Note: He served in Co. C, 194th Ohio Volunteer Infantry and is buried in Mound Hill Cemetery, Oct. 11, 1842-July 29, 1932.]

Gallipolis Daily Tribune
July 30, 1932
Transcribed by Henny Evans


Frederick, Jacob

Found Dead
     Jacob Frederick was found dead near his home at Rodney. Mr. Frederick, was found dead in his barn Wednesday evening about 5 o'clock. He had gone out to do some work and not returning some of his folks went out and discovered his body. Heart disease was the cause of his sudden death.
     Besides a wife he leaves four children all married. Mr. Noah Frederick, of Morgan Township, was a brother. The funeral services were conducted this Friday afternoon by Rev. W.J. Fulton, interment following at Fairfield [should be Fairview Long] by Glassburn. Mr. Frederick was an honorable, upright citizen.

[Note: He is listed as a Gallia County Squirrel Hunter. His tombstone dates are 1 Nov 1837 to 2 Dec 1903.]

Gallipolis Daily Tribune
Decemeber 4, 1903
Transcribed by Henny Evans


Freshcorn, Martin

IN MEMORY
     Martin Freshcorn was born in Pennsylvania, Nov. 5, 1845, and departed this life on Sept. 6, 1922, at his home near Vinton at 9 p.m., aged 77 years and 10 months.
     He was married to Miss Elizabeth Walter Nov. 10, 1867, and to this union were born five children, three daughters and two sons, Mrs. A.C. Caldwell, Mrs. C.L. Vance, Mrs. Otis McGhee, John L. and J.A., all of Vinton; also 23 grandchildren and six great-grandchildren.
     Besides his loving companion and children he leaves one full sister, Mrs. Hamilton Walter of Bidwell, and two half sisters and one half brother, Mrs. Margaret Neighborall and Mrs. John Lyle of Wilkesville and Henry Huffman of Vinton, and a host of more distant relatives and friends.
     He enlisted in Co. F, 29th O.V.I., in 1863, and was honorably discharged in 1865, having served his country well. He was a member of the G.A.R. Vinton post and of the Morgan Center church for a number of years and lived a devoted Christian until death. He was a devoted husband, an affectionate and loving father and a good neighbor.
     The funeral was conducted at the F.B. Church Thursday afternoon, Rev. Fulton officiating, burial following in the Webster cemetery by H.K. Butler. Six of his grandsons served as pall bearers.

Card of Thanks
     We earnestly desire to express our sincere and heartfelt thanks to our many friends and neighbors who were in every way so kind and helpful to us, especially Mr. and Mrs. Wm. Miller and Mrs. John Huntley, during the illness and death of our husband and father. Mrs. Freshcorn and Children.

[Note: He is buried in what is now known as McGhee Cemetery.]

Gallia Times
September 21, 1922
Transcribed by Henny Evans                                                                          Top of Page


Friend, Charles S.

Death Of Charles S. Friend.
     Mr. Charles S. Friend, after a long illness died at his home in this City on Wednesday morning at 5 o'clock, in the 51st year of his age. He leaves a wife and five children: Mrs. Joseph Jolly, Mrs. Samuel J. Johnson, Mrs. Ed Shoemaker, Fred and Minnie. A stepson, Prof. Charles Treadway, also survies him. Mr. Friend was a native of Philadelphia. He came here during the war as a member of the Trumbull Guards and has made his home here since his discharge from the service. He was one of the first employees of the furniture factory and remained in its employ until April, last, when ill health from la grippe caused him to quit work. He has been an invalid since from stomach trouble. He was a member of the G. A. R. and at one time was assistant chief of the fire department. When in health he was an industrious citizen and always had a large number of friends. In 1884 he married Mrs. Annie Caloway - Treadway. A daughter of the late Eli Calloway.
     Funeral services were held on Thursday afternoon at 4:30, at the family residence, by Rev. Frank P. Lutz, of the Episcopal Church. The burial was at the old cemeteery, by Wetherholt.

Gallipolis Bulletin
Volume XXV
Number 36
July 16, 1892
Gallipolis, Ohio

Transcribed By: MLT


Frost, Enos

     An obituary with a prolonged religious and patriotic message, too long to be reproduced here, appeared in the Gallipolis Journal on February 25, 1864. It stated he "was found dead on the battlefield, with his face to the foe, mangled and bloody, scorched by the sulphorous fire." He was the son of Solomon and Polly Frost and he enlisted in 1862 in the 18th Ohio Light Artillery and was killed in battle.

[Note: The 18th OVHA was involved in the battles around Chattanooga near the end of 1863 and so this is most likely where he was killed. The family lived in Gallipolis. Both parents died in early 1863.]

Created from the Gallipolis Journal and military records
February 25, 1864
Transcribed by Henny Evans


Frownfelter, Gideon

     Gideon Frownfelter was born December 29, 1842 at Mansfield, Ohio. When a boy he moved with his parents to Gallipolis, Ohio. He passed into the Great Beyond at the home of his daughter, Mrs. Clemmie
McCall, at Beatrice, Nebraska, April 19, 1933, at the age of 90 years, 3 months and 20 days. He was a devout follower of the Christian faith; his father being a United Brethern minister. Soon after coming to Nebraska in 1891, he became a member of the
Methodist church of Carleton.
     He was the oldest son of a family of nine children and joined the Union Army when nineteen years of age, and devoted three years and three months to the service of his country in the 18th Ohio Battery. Shortly after his discharge he was married to Miss Nancy Trotter. To this union was born six daughters and one son. His wife, two daughters, Gusta and Victoria, and one son, Elmer, have preceded him in death.
     He is survived by four daughters, Mrs. Clemmie McCall of Beatrice, Mrs. P.E. Woodward of Winnett, Montana, Mrs. M.C. Miller of Los Angeles, Calif., Miss Nellie Frownfelter of Norfolk, Nebr.; and one brother, Jonah Frownfelter of Gallipolis, Ohio; seven grandchildren; 12 great grandchildren and many friends.
     He came to Carleton, Nebraska in 1891 and resided there until 1922. Since then he has made his home with his daughter at Beatrice, Nebraska.
     Funeral services were conducted from the M.E. Church at Carleton, Nebraska, in charge of Rev. F.F. Travis of the Beatrice Methodist church. Interment was made in
the Carleton cemetery.

Hebron Nebraska Register
April 27,1933
Transcribed by Henny Evans


Fry, H. J.

     Some of our people attended the funeral of H. J. Fry, an old soldier at Mercerville Sunday.

Gallipolis Bulletin
October 12, 1911
Transcribed by Irene Blamer                                                                           Top of Page


Fry, John

     Mr. John Fry died in Lafayette, Ind., March 24, 1890, from injuries received in a railroad accident and was buried in the old cemetery in this city last Friday afternoon. His remains were brought here by his wife, who was accompanied by his mother and step-father, Mr. and Mrs. Hugh Daughtey of Columbus, Ohio, and Mr. George Rodgers, Secretary of Lafayette Lodge, I. O. O. F. Mr. Fry was a member of Ashland Lodge, I. O. O. F., and that Lodge sent two representatives to the funeral--Mr. J. C. Crawford and Mr. J. M. Smith.
     Mr. Fry was married a number of years ago to Miss Clara Denney, daughter of the late Zachariah Denney, of this place. Mr. F. will be remembered as the engineer who accompanied the first locomotive to Gallipolis. He was a man of many good qualities and much admired by all who knew him. He was born in Cuyahoga County, Ohio, and was 48 years of age at the time of his death.
     The funeral services were conducted by Rev. R. H. Coulter, assisted by Rev. P. A. Baker, at the residence of Mrs. Denney, on Fourth Street. Ariel Lodge, I. O. O. F., of this city attended the funeral in a body. Mrs. Fry and those who accompanied her her returned to their respective homes on Monday.

[Note: Co. E, 172nd OVI; buried Pine street]

Gallipolis Bulletin
April 1, 1890  Vol. XXIII No. 20
Transcribed by Irene Blamer


Fulks, Wm. H.

     DIED - Mr. Wm. H. Fulks, a prominent and respected citizen of Guyan twp., after many months suffering from consumption, on 13th inst., aged about fifty. He leaves a widow and nine children---two sons and seven daughters--together with a large circle of friends to mourn his loss. We tender our sympathy to the bereaved family.

[Note: William was born in November of 1836 and served in Company I, 71st regiment, Ohio Volunteer Infantry. His pension application describes him as five feet eleven, hair and complexion light, eyes blue. During his year of service, he contracted typhoid fever and mumps. One of the affidavits attesting to his service was from his brother-in-law, William P. Williams, also a Civil War veteran.]

The Gallipolis Journal,
Wednesday, May 20, 1891
Transcribed by Eve Hughes, great-grandaughter 


Fuller, Thaddeus

Thad Fuller
     The East Liverpool,Ohio papers announce the death there July 7 of Thaddeus Fuller, a one time resident of Gallipolis. The deceased was a member of Trumbull Guards, better known as the Cheeseheads, a company of Western Reserve Civil War soldiers, stationed here during the Civil War. His father T.T. Fuller was also a resident serving as constable.
      Thad Fuller was a skillfull brickmason. He was asked to return to Gallipolis by the late Ethanile Betz, the contractor and was a resident for 20 years. He and A. R. Weaver composed a brace of workmen who built the old Betz Opera House, corner of Second Avenue and State Street, The M.E. Church in 1875, Walker and Haney livery stable, the Empire Furniture Co.Building, the Courthouse in (1878) and other buildings. They also built a big school house, church and the Staats store building at Point Pleasant, W.Va.
      Mr Fuller is survived by his widow, a second wife, whose name we think was Ward, and several children.

[Note: not buried here; second wife was Flora Ward]

Gallipolis Bulletin                                                                                                Top of Page


Fuller, William Greenleaf

Col. W. G. Fuller Dead
Weakness Incident to old age the cause of Death
Peaceful end of a very prominent, successful and useful citizen
     The passing of Colonel W. G. Fuller Friday afternoon, July 17, 1903, was not an unexpected event. He has never been so well since the fall of last Christmas on the sidewalk. After that he received another fall from the steps of his boarding house, Mrs. Stewart’s on First avenue, which while not serious did not help him in any. For four or five weeks he has been failing rapidly. Friday morning he awakened feeling sick. Dr. Bean and his son Capt. W. B. Fuller were both called, but his system was completely worn out and came to a stand still at 3:30 later in the day.
     His funeral services will be conducted by the Presbyterian minister at Marietta Sunday at 2 p. m., at the home of Mrs. G. K. Lord, she being a sister of Mrs. Fuller.Hayward & Son were in charge of the remains here. They will be taken to Marietta at about 7 o’clock, Sunday morning, accompanied by family friends and Capt. W. G. Sibley representing the Masonic Lodge here.
     The main events of Col. Fuller’s life are embraced in his biography in another place taken from Hardesty’s history.
     Things continued along in much the same way as the end of that article discloses, until in 1894, when Col. Fuller, T. R. Hayward and J. C. Hutsinpiller withdrew from active service in the company, and the active management descended upon the shoulders of W. B. Shober, Capt. Burtt Fuller and Mr. Frank Hutsinpiller and then Max Shober bought stock and went into the firm as shipping clerk.
     Three years ago the Fuller-Hutsinpiller Co., sold out it might be said to the Ohio Valley Furniture Co., of Charleston, or taking stock in it to the extent of the factory. The Ohio Valley owning their own factory at Charleston and the Fuller-Hutsinpiller factory here.
     When Col. Fuller first came here he went into the retail furniture business with Mr. Will C. Hayward where the Bankrupt store now is. This was just after the war. He brought $10,000 here with him as he told us himself, and he wanted to invest his capital in manufacturing. So he went into partnership with the late Capt. James Gatewood and the firm name became the Gatewood-Fuller C.It was afterward incorporated as the Fuller-Hutsinpiller Co., and several new stockholders went in, among them Mr. T. R. Hayward who was then a mail agent on the river.
     It was pretty hard to make the factory a success at first but it was finally brought out by their good management. Nine years ago Col. Fuller owned $21,000 stock in the concern. When his son Burtt was married first, he transferred $5,000 of this stock to him as one of the wedding presents. His estate ought to be quite large. He used to have a Texas farm, National bank stock and various kinds of stock. We have heard no one place his estate at worth less than $30,000. He was 76 years, six months and 11 days old.
     Col. Fuller was just a bit eccentric in character, but was always accounted straight square and honourable among business men and his growing old and passing away was a great loss to Gallipolis.

Taken from the Gallipolis Daily
Saturday Evening, July 18, 1903.
Transcribed by James K. Ward, Cobble Hill, British Columbia, Canada                     Top of Page

BIOGRAPHY
Of William Greenleaf Fuller, who died July 17, 1903.
     William Greenleaf Fuller was born in Boston, Massachusetts, January 6, 1827. His parents were Sumner and Mary Hervey (Greenleaf) Fuller. He married Lucy Lucretia Newton on November 4, 1850. Three children have been born to them, as follows: Alice Hervey, born February 1852, died March 1869, Stella Newton, in August, 1861, died in November, 1861, W. Burtt, in May, 1869, resides in Gallipolis, Ohio. Mrs. Fuller was born in Warren township, Washington county, Ohio. She is the daughter of Oren and Elizabeth Newton, who came to Washington county at an early day. Colonel Fuller, during the war of the rebellion, was captain, then major, then colonel in the quartermaster’s department. He was in charge of United States military telegraph operations in the southwest from Virginia to Texas. His father was in the war of 1812. One of his brothers was a lieutenant in the 6th Ohio Volunteer Infantry. Another brother was a private in a Maine regiment. Colonel William G. Fuller descended from noted New England families, among whom Sumner and John G. Whittier are familiar names. His father, Sumner Fuller, was a prominent man, a graduate of Yale college, a soap and tallow chandler in Boston and Andover, Massachusetts. In 1834 he met with an almost fatal accident; removed to Charleston, South Carolina for his health, but he died there in 1838. His death left his widow with the care of seven children and a small patrimony. These children are all alive at this time, a monument to their mother’s faithfulness. She, too, is still living. In 1846, William G. shipped on the United States steamer Mississippi for the Mexican war, as a fireman. His health failing, he was changed from fireman to ship’s yeoman, having charge of the ship’s stores. At Point Isabel he, with others, volunteered to reinforce General Zach. Taylor, then about to meet the Mexicans in battle. They reached the battle-field just as Taylor was securing his second victory at Reseca de la Palma. Thus he was in the first fight with the Mexicans, and afterwards participated in attacks and exploits along the Mexican coast. He figured in engagements at Tampico, Vera Cruz, Alvarado, Tobasco and Campeachy. In 1847 Mrs. Fuller, without the knowledge of William, procured his discharge on account of his minority, and he turned his attention to the art of telegraphy, then, coming into prominence. He engaged with F. O. J. Smith and Eliphalet Case, in New Orleans, Louisiana. He served that company as operator at Cincinnati, Ohio; New Richmond, Ohio and at Marietta, Ohio, and in 1854 was appointed its superintendant. In 1856 he rebuilt the line on the Marietta and Cincinnati railway; in 1857, built for Amos Kendall the Independent Telegraph Company’s line, on the Baltimore & Ohio and Marietta & Cincinnati railroads, from Baltimore to Cincinnati, opening the first opposition to the Western Union Telegraph Company in the Burnett House, in the latter city; remained in charge of these lines until the opening of the war of the rebellion.
     In May 1861, he was appointed to manage the government telegraphs on the branch of the Baltimore & Ohio railroad between Grafton and Parkersburg, West Virginia. In July, the same year, he had undertaken to follow the army wherever it went with telegraph lines. In this month McClellan began his advance from Clarksburg via Buckhannon, and was followed by the first field telegraph of the war under Colonel Fuller’s direction. The line was completed to Rich Mountain the day of the fight. Another line was constructed from Clarksburg, West Virginia, the end of the line being only three miles from Carnifax Ferry on the day of the battle. Thence lines up New River and down the Big Kanawha, a cable laid across the Ohio, and the lines extended to the M. & C. railroad at Hamilton. Fuller was then ordered to Kentucky. He constructed the line to Somerset, the day of the battle of Mill Springs. Then from Lebanon to Nashville, Tennessee, and from Lexington, Kentucky to the Cumberland Gap. Plum’s History of the United States Military Telegraph says: “W. G. Fuller and his men accomplished a great work among the rocky cliffs and roads and barren mountains of that region. Constantly beset with dangers, the corps never faltered.” “It is a pleasing fact that throughout the war Colonel Fuller and his corps never failed to erect a telegraph on any route that the troops could pass over, and many a line was built where an army could not go.” In 1863 Colonel Fuller was ordered to the Vicksburg district; continuing with Grant until after that surrender. Then to New Orleans, where he extended a submarine cable line to Mobile Bay; and with the aid of the navy blew up the obstructions and torpedos sunk in that bay, by an electric explosion of powder sunk in cans. Fuller entered Mobile on the second boat that landed there. He became responsible for from eight to ten million dollars worth of government property scattered over seven States, yet settled his accounts without a dollar of defalcation occurring upon the department books. At the close of the war he declined an appointment to take charge of overland lines to California, his nervous system being shattered by his long service and exposure, and settled in Gallipolis in 1865. He was elected an elder in the Presbyterian church in 1866, having been a member of that body since 1849. In 1868 the firm of Gatewood, Fuller & Co. was formed, and the first furniture factory was built in Galipollis. The firm of Fuller Hutsinpiller & Co. succeeded this firm in 1870, and still continues, employing over 100 hands, Colonel Fuller having always had the financial management. He has never applied for an office or a pension, although a constant sufferer from a shattered nervous system. ----- Hardesty’s History of Gallia County. Published in 1882.                          


Fulton, Alvin

Alvin Fulton Died At Gahanna Tuesday
     Mr. Oliver Fulton, died at the home of his son-in-law and daughter, Mr. and Mrs. W. W. Hurn at Gahanna, Ohio, Tuesday evening, June 28th, 1921.
     Mr. Fulton was always known to be a kind and charitable man and one who had many friends. He died at the age of 94 and had resided in Addison township all his life, except the past 11 years he made his home with his daughter, Mrs. W. W. Hurn. He leaves two daughters, Mrs. W. W. Hurn of Gahanna and Mrs. W. R. Hurn of Bulaville.
     The remains arrived Sunday at the home of his youngest daughter, Mrs. W. R. Hurn of Bulaville where the funeral was held on Monday at 10:30 at Christian Church by Rev. W. A. Fulton and the burial at a near by cemetery by Wetherholt & Entsminger.

[Note: Squirrel Hunter]

Gallipolis Daily Tribune
Tuesday, July 5, 1921
Transcribed by Sandy L. Milliron                                                                       Top of Page


Fulton, David

David Fulton Dead
     Mr. David Fulton, a well known and highly respected resident of this city, died at his home on Vinton street on Tuesday, Jan. 26, 1917. He was aged 77 years, 3 months and 7 days.
     He was united in marriage with Miss Fannie Bunce on April 20, 1864. To them was born one daughter, Miss Effie Fulton, who, with her mother, survives him.
     Mr. Fulton was a soldier in the Civil War, serving in the 141st O. V. I. under command of Capt. Rothgeb.
In the year 1874 he professed faith in Christ, was baptized and united with the Campaign F. B. Church where he retained his membership until his death. He never lived close to the church, and was not able to attend regularly, but he always retained his love for the cause and lived an upright Christian life.
     He leaves to mourn his death his companion and his daughter, one sister, Mrs. Eliza Skinner of Villista, Iowa, two brothers, Charles and Henry C. Fulton of Bulaville, with a large circle of other kindred.
     The funeral was held Sunday forenoon at Bulaville, the services by Rev. W. J. Fulton assisted by Rev. W. E. Ewing. An escort of G. A. R. of Gallipolis conducted their burial services at the church.. The burial in the cemetery near by followed by Wetherholt.

[Note: Stone. Born 1829 Buried. Rife. Addison]

The Gallia Times
Wed. Jan 31, 1917 Vol. XIX, No. 5
Transcribed by Charles Wright


Fulton, Oliver

Died, Nov. 4th, 1862, of flux, Oliver Fulton, near Helena, Arkansas, aged nineteen years
     Oliver, like many others, though young, heard his country's call and over twelve months ago volunteered in Co. E, 56th Regiment O.V., and since then, with many others, suffered many privations and hardships. Though his labor is (un)finished, his warfare is ended. No more will his pleasant voice be heard around the domestic or social circle; we shall see him no more here, but we trust our loss is his gain. Let us who mourn our loss be humble and thankful that the hand of the enemy has not fallen upon us. Oliver was a good boy, and was respected by all that knew him. He was a good and dutiful soldier. "It is the Lord that giveth, and him that taketh, and blessed be his name." [Followed by the first verse of America.]
     William

[Note: This is from a letter that one of the soldiers in the 56th OVI sent to the editor of the Gallipolis Journal.]

The Gallipolis Journal
January 1, 1863
Transcribed by Eva Swain Hughes                                                                     Top of Page


Fulton, Robert M.

Death of Robt. M. Fulton
     Mr. Robert M. Fulton, of near Bulaville, ill for a year of more, died Monday afternoon, March 4, 1901, leaving a wife, formerly Miss Rothgeb, but no children. His funeral services will be conducted at his late home Wednesday, the burial following at the Fulton graveyard. He leaves a brother, Alvin Fulton, and was a most excellent gentleman and in good circumstances. After long illness he was attacked by the grip and that finished him.

[Note: He served in Co. B and E, 56th Ohio Volunteer Infantry. The cemetery is called Rife Cemetery today.]

Gallipolis Daily Tribune
March 5, 1901
Transcribed by Henny Evans


Galloway, William

Wm. Galloway Dead
     William Galloway was found dead in bed Sunday morning at his home on Walter MCormick's farm near town. He was a veteran of the Civil War, a gardener by occupation and was about 80 years of age. Coroner Mack held an inquest Monday and found that his death was due to natural causes. The funeral was held Tuesday, the burial following at Mound Hill Cemetery by Undertaker Wetherholt.

[Note: Died Jan. 1912; served in Co. D, 74th OVI.]

Gallipolis Bulletin
Feb. 1, 1912 No. 5 , P-1
Transcribed by Charles Wright                                                                       Top of Page

Galloway, William

Death of Wm. Galloway
     Mr. William Galloway, a nice old man, a tree trimmer and sort of gardner, living on Walter McCormick’s place near town, was found dead in bed by a woman living on the place Sunday morning. He had been ill with kidney complaint for years, but he was in his usual health the night before but had been taking medicine for his trouble. Dr. Mack held an inquest yesterday and found that he had died from natural causes. He was nearly 90 years old and had been a soldier. He was buried by Wetherholt today at Mound Hill.

[Note: Name: George Galloway died 1/28/1912, 87 yrs. old per death cert. The name may be Wm. G. Galloway. It is listed as William C. Galloway on the Civil War Soldiers and Sailors website, but misspellings were common on those records. When he was discharged from the army it was as a First Lieutenant.]

Gallipolis Daily Tribune
Tuesday, January 30, 1912
Transcribed by Sandy L. Milliron


Gardner, George P., Capt.

Capt. George P. Gardner
Veteran Dock Man Dies Suddenly at Pt. Pleasant
     Capt. George Park Gardner, age 76, died suddenly Saturday night of heart failure shortly after retiring at his home in Pt. Pleasant.
     Capt. Gardner was born in Gallia county, O., near Kyger, and he was a Union soldier in the Civil War. He was a former sheriff of Mason county, a member of the Pt. Pleasant school board, proprietor of the Enterprise steamboat dry docks, and was prominent in the affairs of Pt. Pleasant. Capt. Gardner was the father of Capt. Sil. G. Gardner of this city and he and his son owned the steamers C.C. Bowyer, Helen E. and ferry steamer Relief.
     Capt. Gardner was a fine old gentleman of Christian character and unquestioned integrity. He was known from Pittsburg to New Orleans as an honest dockman and was in charge of his successful dock plant every day. He was ill but a few hours before death summoned him.
     Many friends in Gallipolis will regret to hear of Capt. Gardner's death. A wife and three sons survive. Funeral will be held at Pt. Pleasant Tuesday afternoon.

[Note: He served in Batty E, West Virginia Light Artillery. He was buried in Lone Oak Cemetery in Pt. Pleasant, Mason County, West Virginia. His middle name was also found as Parkinson.]

Gallipolis Daily Tribune
March 12, 1917
Transcribed by Henny Evans


Gardner, James W.

Prominent Citizen Passes
Mr. James W. Gardner Succumbs to a Long, Trying Illness
     Mr. James William Gardner, for many years a man of affairs in Gallipolis, died Wednesday afternoon at 4:30, March 27, 1912, at the family residence after a decline in health which began several years ago.
Mr. Gardner was the son of William L. and Harriet Gardner, and was born in this City, January 17, 1844. He was married May 5, 1868, to Miss Sally Damron. One child was born to the pair, Mrs. Will Hayward of this City.
     Mr. Gardner was a contractor who built several river dykes — one at Ravenswood, another at Marietta and was successful in accumulating property. He gave up the contracting business many years ago, but has been frequently chosen for various positions of trust about the City in which an expert knowledge of property values was required. For 25 years he was the treasurer and a trustee of Grace M. E. Church of this City. During the past ten years he has been Vice President of the Ohio Valley Bank of Gallipolis.
     Mr. Gardner leaves besides his wife and daughter and grandchildren, his venerable mother, now ninety years of age, a sister, Mrs. Judge Cowden, and a brother, Mr. Ben Gardner, all of this City. His remains will be buried at Mound Hill Saturday afternoon at 2:30 under the direction of the Lodge of Odd Fellows, of which body he was one of the oldest members in the County. The Rev. Mr. Evans will be the minister in charge.
Miss Helen Hayward will be home from Ohio State University tomorrow. Gardner Hayward, at school in New York, will not be able to attend his grandfather’s funeral.
     Mr. Gardner was a very domestic man. He loved his home and his family, and was never happier than when with them. His daughter and grandchildren were the apples of his eye, and he never could do too much for them. They have lost the comfort of a very great love indeed. Mr. Gardner will be remembered as a man of influence, integrity, and kindness by all who knew him. May he rest in peace.

[Note: Previously typed transcription (author unknown) found in the Simmerman files, Damron file, Bossard Library.]

Gallipolis Daily Tribune
Volume XVIII Number 76
March 28, 1912


Gardner, James William

Jas. W. Gardner Passed Away Last Wednesday
     James William Gardner passed away at his home in this city on Wednesday afternoon, March 27, 1912, aged sixty-eight years. He was son of William L. and Harriet Gardner and was married in 1868 to Miss Sallie Damron. He is survived by his wife, his mother, who is 90 years of age, a daughter Mrs. William C. Hayward, a sister, Mrs. Alice Cowden, a brother Ben, all of this city.
     Mr. Gardner was a contractor for many years and built several dikes on the Ohio River. The government dikes at Marietta and Ravenswood were both constructed by him. He had been the Vice-president of the Ohio River Valley Bank for the past ten years and has held many positions of trust during his long and useful life. Mr. Gardner was a member of Grace M. E. Church and had been its Treasurer and Trustee for the past twenty-five years.
     The funeral services were conducted at the family residence on upper Second Avenue Saturday afternoon by Rev. F. M. Evans of Grace M. E. Church. The interment was at Mound Hill Cemetery by Hayward & Son, the services being under the direction of Odd Fellows of which Mr. Gardner was a member. In the death of Mr. Gardner Gallipolis loses an honorable and useful citizen and the public will extend their heartfelt sympathy to the bereaved family.

[Note: Stone. Born Jan. 17, 1844; Civil War service Co B, 60th O.V.I.]

Gallipolis Bulletin
April 4, 1912 No. 14, P-1
Transcribed by Charles Wright                                                                       Top of Page


Gardner, John H.

     John H. Gardner was born in Mason County 69 years ago and served his country during the War of the Rebellion as a private in Co. B, 4th West Virginia Infantry. He enlisted in June, 1861 and was mustered out with his regiment in July, 1865, having spent over 4 years of his early manhood to uphold his country's honor.
     Comrade Gardner leaves to mourn their loss a wife and two sons, William of near Hobson and George of this place and one daughter, Mrs. J.A. Searls of this place and several grandchildren. The funeral was held at Clifton, West Virginia, Monday at one o'clock and interment at the Clifton Cemetery by Undertaker Eli Hix.

[Note: Clifton is in Mason County, West Virginia. However, on findagrave there is a marker for him at Greenwood Cemetery, Wheeling, Ohio County, West Virginia. Possibly this is a memorial for soldiers but shows as a grave. He was born in 1839 and died February 22, 1908 at Kyger, Cheshire Township.]

Unknown paper
February 1908
Transcribed by Henny Evans


Gardner, Perrin

Death of Dr. Perrin Gardner
     The long continued illness of Dr. Perrin Gardner, which has been mentioned frequently in The Journal columns, terminated in death Saturday April 15, 1893, at two o'clock in the afternoon. He was the son of William and Rebecca Gardner, born on the old home place near Porter, sixty-five years ago, on the 11th day of next May.
     He left brothers, Rev. Wilson Gardner of Columbus and Silas of Springfield Township, this county, and sisters, Esther and Almira Fillmore of this city and Rebecca Nye of Illinois.
He studied medicine when a young man with the late Dr. James Cromley of this city and afterwards graduated at Starling Medical College of Columbus in 1859.
     In March 1856, he was united in marriage with Miss Lusette Walker, of Cincinnati, who survives him and by whom he became the father of three children, two of whom, Edward and Mrs. Willard Gorslene of this city, also survive him. After marriage he came directly to Gallipolis and opened an office nearly opposite the old Methodist Church on Second Street, in the meantime forming a partnership wit the late Dr. E. Morgan. At the end of four years he moved to Cheshire and remained there until July, 1861, when he entered the Government service as Assistant Surgeon of the First Regiment of West Virginia Cavalry, being after promoted to Surgeon in which capacity he served until the close of the war, being mustered out at Wheeling, West Virginia.
     After the war, he settled in Porter, this county, residing there and practicing medicine for many years and also at Wilkesville, Vinton County, five years. He came to Gallipolis about eleven years ago, built a residence on Cedar Street and has resided there till death. He attained considerable distinction in his profession, especially as a Surgeon and enjoyed, when able to attend to it, a large and lucrative practice. Ever since the war he was a great sufferer from neuralgia in the head, at times, which grew more and more severe as time passed For this disability he drew a pension of $80 per month. The disease grew upon him to such an extent that four years ago, it began to effect his mind; but it was barely noticeable and only at times, until later on, when he became utterly incapacitated from mental and physical infirmities to practice his profession and for the past three years he has done nothing.
     In addition to his neuralgia trouble, he became unable to walk, not from paralysis, but from a disease, the technical name for which we have forgotten. For the past five or six weeks he has been confined to his bed. His sufferings were quite severe; but he bore them with patience and was prepared and ready and welcomed the end; which came gently and peacefully as fall the dews of night. Dr. Gardner was accounted a bit eccentric, but was of a lovable disposition, excellent memory, very observing and good company and enjoying the friendship of a large circle of friends.
     His funeral services took place at his late home, Monday afternoon at two o'clock and were conducted by Rev. P.A. Baker. Burial was in Mound Hill Cemetery.

Gallipolis Journal
April 19, 1893
Transcribed by F.K. Brown                                                                             Top of Page


Gardner, Silas

OLD RESIDENT of Springfield Tp
Died Friday With Pneumonia - Burial Sunday at Bethel
     Silas Gardner, one of the oldest and best known residents of Springfield Tp., died Friday afternoon, February 17, with pneumonia, at 908 Second ave., where he has lived for the past year with his daughter Elizabeth R. and one son Samuel J. Gardner, both of this city. His wife, who was Miss Harriett Johnston, died in 1903.
     The funeral services were held Sunday at 1 P. M. by Rev. Mr. Farrar at Bethel M. E. Church of which the deceased has been a member for fifty years. The burial occurred at the same place by Wetherholt and the pall bearers were Robert C. and Samuel Johnston, S. J. Kerr, Lafayette Gaston, C. W. Kerr and W. W. Watts.

[Note: Born Jan. 26, 1830 Buried Bethel Addison; Batt'y. B, 1 Ohio Light Art'y.]

Gallipolis Journal
Wed. Feb. 22, 1911 , Vol. 93, No. 78
Transcribed by Charles Wright

Gardner, Silas

Death of Mr. Gardner
     Mr. Silas Gardner of whose critical illness with pneumonia we made mention, passed away at 4:40 o’clock Friday afternoon, February 17, 1911, aged 81 years and 21 days.
     The funeral services will be conducted Sunday at 1 p.m. at Bethel Church by Rev. Mr. Farrar, of Bidwell and Gallipolis Circuit. The burial by Undertaker Wetherholt will be at the same place. The pall bearers will be Messrs. Robt. C. and Samuel Johnston, S. J. Kerr, Lafayette Gaston, C. W. Kerr and W. W. Watts.
Mr. Gardner was one of the best known and highly esteemed residents of Springfield township. He was united in marriage in 1851 to Miss Harriet Johnston, who died in 1903, and is survived by two children, Elizabeth R. and Samuel J. Gardner, both of this city.
     He had been a member of the Bethel M. E. Church for fifty years and lived the life of a correct man. About fifteen months ago, he moved to Gallipolis and died at No. 908 Second avenue, where he lived with his daughter.

Gallipolis Daily Tribune
Saturday, February 18, 1911
Transcribed by Sandy L. Milliron                                                                        Top of Page


Gardner, Wm. L.

     By telegraph we have the sad news of the death of Capt. Wm. L. Gardner and 1st Lieut. Adam Morehart, of the 8th Va. Mounted Infantry, who were killed on Wednesday, the 26th ult., in a skirmish with the rebels near Rocky Gap, about nine miles from Lewisburg, in West Virginia. These gentlemen were both citizens of Gallipolis, and highly esteemed as honest, worthy men. Capt. Gardner leaves a family to mourn his loss.—Lieut. Morehart was a native of Germany, but for some years resided in Gallipolis, where he has a sister and brother yet living. [. . .]

The Gallipolis Journal
September 3, 1863
Transcribed by Eva Swain Hughes


Gardner, William Lewis, Capt.

     Capt. Gardner, husband of Harriet Gardner, was killed in the battle of Rocky Gap, Virginia August 26, 1863.

[Note: Information found in an article about Harriet Gardner's 85th birthday.]

Gallipolis Daily Tribune
March 16, 1908
Abstracted by Henny Evans


Garrett, Alonzo B.

Garrett Rites Will Be Held Thursday A. M.
Pythians, Legionaries And Spanish War Vets To Take Part Therein.
     Funeral services for Dr. Alonzo B. Garrett will be held at Grace M. E. Church at 10:30 Thursday, with Rev. Scott Westerman in charge. Burial will be in Mound Hill Cemetery by George J. Wetherholt & Sons. For an hour before the services the body will lie in state in the vestibule of the Church, Lafayette Post, American Legion, supplying the Guard Of Honor.
     Pall Bearers will be selected from the membership of Naomi Lodge No. 55, Knights of Pythias. There will be a flag presentation by Spanish-American Veterans and there will be a firing squad made up of Legionaries.
     Comments made last night by old friends of Dr. Garrett as to his carreer as a medical pracitiioner indicated that he had aquired considerable property. He was industrious, prudent and conservative,
and it is believed that his practive and investments and pension increased his wealth year after year over an extended period. As to the nature of his holding, but little is known. He owned a valuable farm and orchard located between Miller and Athalia on which stand a large red brick house near the river bank. Dr. Garrett's age was 90 years, 10 months, 10 days and he was a son of Lewis Preston Garrett and Sarah E. Garrett of Wayne County, W. Va.

[Note: Co B 45th Ky Inf; Also served for 3 months in 1861 at the beginning of the war in Co. I, 18th OVI.]

Gallipolis Daily Tribune
Volume XLIV
Number 247
November 2, 1938
Gallipolis, Ohio

Transcribed By: MLT


Gaskins, John

Death Of An Soldier
     John Gaskins, an old soldier of the 18th Ohio, died Monday morning at Holcomb. He had just got an increase of pension from $14 ro $20. Mr. Gaskins was about 65 years old. He was buried Tuesday at Bethel, the services being conducted by the Rev. Gomer Hughs. Mr. Gaskins was a fine man who was held in high esteem by all who knew him. He had an extra good record as a brave soldier.

Gallipolis Daily Tribune
Volume XIII
Number 79
April 3, 1900
Gallipolis, Ohio

Transcribed By: MLT                                                                                     Top of Page


Gaston, Lafayette

Lafayette Gaston, Grand Old Man, Dies in 91st. Year
Pneumonia Fatal to Beloved Citizen and Soldier Hero
Funeral Tuesday P.M. Burial in Salem Cemetery
     Lafayette Gaston, a hero in war and an exemplar in peaceful pursuits, died at his home here at 10:35 Sunday morning. Death from bronchial pneumoina and arterio scer(l)osis after a week's illness.
When a serious affliction began to rack a sturdy frame, which, though wounded in battle, had withstood fourscore and ten years, he was reluctant to admit it, because of his anxiety to minister to his faithful helpmate, who was confined to her bed a day or two before his illness caused concern. Ere he passed on, there was a change for the better in her condition, and last night she talked with natural pride and boundless affection for her constant companion of the last 64 years.
     Mr. Gaston was the oldest of the old veterans in Gallipolis, and his was the second death in the thinning ranks in a period of 54 hours, John Roush, 10 Pine St., died early Friday morning.

Born in West Virginia
     As an industrious and dutiful boy, as a brave soldier for the Union, as a citizen, public official, neighbor, friend, churchman, husband and otherwise, Mr. Gaston's career left little to be desired. He earned and held down through the years the respect and esteem and admiration of thousands with whom he had come in contact.
     He was born May 30, 1843--almost 91 years ago--in Wood County, W.Va., a few miles below Parkersburg. He was a son of Samuel A. and Susan Hawk Gaston. The elder Gaston came to this county about a century ago and helped to build some of the first covered bridges over Raccoon. He returned to Wood county and later moved his family to Missouri and engaged in the timber business and died there in 1856. Soon thereafter the widow and children moved to Wilkesville.
     It was there that Lafayette Gaston enlisted as a soldier in August, 1862, becoming a member of the 90 regiment O.V.I. Four months later, at the battle of Stone River, he performed a deed of remarkable heroism and was shot through the breast by a musket ball. The incident is described in Hardesty's history of that Ohio military unit:

"The right of our army was being thrashed like a school boy. On the field between the lines lay a wounded comrade, exposed to the galling fire from both sides, raised partly up on his hands and knees, who was begging for someone to come and rescue him from the hands of the rebels.
"Lafe Gaston cast his cartridge box and gun on the ground, rushed between the lines and rescued the poor fellow. When Lieut. Witherspoon remarked to Gaston he might carry the wounded man back to the hopsital Gaston requested someone else to take him as he (Gaston) wanted to stay in the battle."

     A subsequent account of this act indicated the hero was wounded during the rescue. At any rate he was seriously wounded during that battle.

A Modest Hero
     J.L. Hatfield, writing to the historian of the regiment, in 1914, told of meeting a man at Hermos Beach, Calif., a year or two before that and of repeating the story about the hero of Stone River. "This man seemed surprised," Hatfield said, "and declared 'I have lived near Gaston for many years and never heard of that incident.'  "But I was not surprised at that," continued Hatfield, "as it would be more natural for Lafe Gaston to do a heroic deed than to boast of it." The man whom Hatfield met at Hermosa was Robert C. Johnston, who moved to California from here, and died there four or five years ago.
Mr. Gaston served till the end of the war, despite his wound, having received an assignment to look after the cook house of a soldiers hospital in Nashville. He was honorably discharged there at the end of the war in 1865.
     On January 1, 1870, he and Anna L. Heacock, who survives him, were married at her home in Salem tp.--a home in the forest to which she was carried as a baby in her mother's arms from Pomeroy, through miles of woodland, when her parents came to Meigs county from Columbiana. For five years the Gastons had charge of the Meigs county infirmary. Then they moved down into Cheshire tp. where they owned and lived on, successively, the Strong Bradbury farm (later the Edmiston farm) on Jesse Creek, then the farm now owned by Peter Brechtel, and later the farm near Cheshire now owned by Jacob Rupe.

Here 17 Years Ago
     They left Cheshire to take charge of the Children's Home in 1885 and during the 13 years of their management endeared themselves to hundreds of children long since grown to womanhood and manhood. They have owned two farms near the Children's Home and lived on what was known as the Ed LeBlanc farm after leaving the Children's Home. For the past 17 years they have lived in Gallipolis and own and occupy what was the J.W. Miles home at 602 Fourth ave.
     To the Gastons was born one daughter, Eva, who became the first wife of Frank H. Mills. She died June 24, 1898.
     Mr. Gaston was active and popular in the G.A.R. for half a century or more and was a faithful and devout member of the Methodist church.
     Mr. Gaston is survived by one brother and one sister: Sam Gaston, Pittsburgh, Kansas, and Mrs. Dee Halliday, widow of Sam Halliday, Parsons, Kansas, besides nieces and nephews also in that state.
     Brief funeral services will be held a 1 o'clock Tuesday at the home, in charge of Rev. W.H. Wilbur. Burial will be made in Salem cemetery by Funeral Director H.K. Butler of Vinton. A monument for himself and Mrs. Gaston was erected there several years ago.

Gallipolis Daily Tribune
February 5, 1934
Transcribed by Henny Evans                                                                          Top of Page

[And this was found in the newspaper for the following day.]

Squire Boice Attends Funeral of Comrade

     Squire M.C. Boice of near Kyger was here Tuesday to attend the funeral of his old comrade and former neighbor, Lafayette Gaston. The latter once lived on Jessie Creek farm, which he sold to the Edmistons, and which is now owned by Clell Conkle. It is scarcely half a mile below the Boice farm. It was Mr. Boice's first visit here for some weeks.

February 6, 1934


Gates, James M.

     James M. Gates was born in Gallia County, son of Moses and Harriet Baltzell Gates. He died at his home in Charleston, West Virginia January 15, 1904 at the age of 68. As a young man he moved to Charleston and shortly thereafter enlisted as a drummer boy in the 23rd Virginia Regiment. He remained in the army for 4 years. Afterwards he returned to Charleston and was in the grocery business for a short time and then conducted a paint and wall paper business.
     He had four brothers, Virgil A. and George W. who survived him, and John Francis and Daniel H. both deceased at the time of his death. Mr. Gates married June 2, 1862 to Virginia Rand and raised a large
family.

History of Charleston and Kanawha County, West Virginia
W.S. Laidley, 1911
Abstracted by Henny Evans


Gates, Robert H.

Death of Robert H. Gates
     Robert H. Gates died on Saturday morning last, about 7:00 o'clock, at the Farmers' Hotel, where he had made his home for several weeks. He requested that the Masonic fraternity conduct his funeral services, without display or ostentation. The funeral was held at Cheshire, a large number of Masons accompanying the remains here from on the noon train Monday.
     Mr. Gates was in his 81st year. He was born at Marietta, Ohio, January 18, 1812. The most of his long life was spent at Lancaster and Gallipolis. He was a man of strong characteristics---impulsive, and often passionate, but with a kind heart. A sister, Mrs. Caroline Van Gilder of Cheshire, and a half-brother, Mr. Noble Gates, of Columbus, survive Uncle Robert.

[Note: According to P.T. Wall he was a silversmith and noted locally as a musician and was the inventor of the Gates horns. He served in the Band in the 117th Ohio Volunteer Infantry and as a private in Co. F, 2nd Ohio Volunteer Heavy Artillery. He is buried in Gravel Hill Cemetery in Cheshire Township.]

Gallipolis Bulletin
October 29, 1892

Gates, Robert Harrison

Death of Robert H. Gates
     Robert Harrison Gates, a well known citizen of this city, whose varying conditions of health have been reported from time to time since last April, when taken ill with la grippe, died this morning at about five minutes before seven o'clock at the Farmers' Hotel where he had made
his home for sometime previous.
     Mr. Gates was born in Marietta, January 18, 1811, and was consequently nearly 82 years old. He was one of nine children of the family of James and Mary Harrison Gates, none of whom survive, but a sister, Mrs. Caroline H. Van Gilder, two a half years his senior, of Cheshire, and a half brother, Noble Gates, of Columbus. His father was a silversmith and a musician and the family moved to Lancaster, and there Robert learned his father's trade. He had inherited his talent for music, and was well known as being skillful in both professions. He married when young Miss Catherine Kincaid, of Lancaster, by whom he had one child, a daughter, now Mrs. Webster, living with her husband, who is a paymaster in the Regular Army, at Seattle, Washington. His wife we believe is dead. Lancaster has been mainly Mr. Gates' home, though he lived here for a while, in the west for a while, and again here, since 1872 or '73.
     He was reconciled and welcomed death, his only request being that his Masonic brethern should conduct his burial services without any display or ostentation, and he passed away painlessly and peacefully. While Mr. Gates was impulsive and passionate, as many talented men are, he was liberal, generous, charitable and socially firm and steadfast. He was honest and independent, and while he belonged to no church--nothing but the Masons and Grand Army, yet he believed in the good and true, and was honorable and high-toned.
He had a wonderful memory and prided himself on being able to remember almost every important historical event, even down to minuteness.

Gallipolis Journal
October 26, 1892
Transcribed by Henny Evans                                                                            Top of Page


Gates, Samuel H. (Hack)

Death of S.H. Gates
     Mr. S.H. Gates of Addison, after, an illness of two years, and utterly incapcitated for work for one
year, with asthma and complications, passed away Tuesday, May 21, 1901, aged 68 years. His funeral services will be conducted at his late beautiful home below Addison, at one o'clock Thursday
afternoon, by Rev. D.H. Jemison, the interment following at Gravel Hill Cemtery, back of Cheshire, by
Wetherholt.
     He left a widow in poor health, Mrs. Fannie Gates, daughter of the late Augustus S. Guthrie, who died in
'65, and sister of Messrs. James and Frank A. Guthrie. He also left sisters Abbie and Hattie, old Academy
students, Hattie being the wife of Capt. Val Collins, of Covington, Ky., and Abbie, single, making her home with her. They and a brother Wallace Gates, a retired business man and invalid, of Portsmouth, were at his bedside before he died. He left no children. The Gates family was orginally of Cheshire, and their old homestead is owned and occupied by Hon. W.S. Matthews.
     Mr. Gates was a prominent and popular steamboat clerk when a young man, but quit the river after the war when he married. He and brother Jack Gates, and Jack Lee of Pomeroy, owned the Jonas Powell, a government boat in war times, his brother being head clerk, the deceased second clerk, and Lee Captain, and they made a great deal of money.
    Mr. Gates was not a church member, but belonged to the Cheshire Lodge of Masons, and stood high with all who knew him. He left a pretty river bottom farm well stocked, and with an elegant home on it.

Gallipolis Daily Tribune
May 24, 1901
Transcribed by Henny Evans


Gates, Virgil A.

Death of Mr. Gates
     Hon. Virgil A. Gates of Charleston, died Wednesday evening, after declining health for the past two years and past 80 years old. He will be buried there. He left two sons and two daughters of adult age: Messers: Thomas and Harry Gates and Mrs. E.J. Goshorn of Charleston and Mrs. J.J. Richardson of Los Angeles, CA. He also left a brother, Hon. Daniel H. Gates of Buffalo, WV, who is also along in years and a brother, George W. Gates, a prominent businessman of Charleston.
     Mr. Gates was a resident of this city for many years and his brothers Daniel, George and James also. Their father was Moses Gates, prominent in the early history of this city.
     Mr. Gates married a daughter of the late Thomas McCafferty, Miss Gelina, a sister of Misses Amanda and Caroline McCafferty and Mrs. Sarah Hamilton. After going to Charleston, he and his brother Daniel were both elected to the House of Delegates of West Virginia. He also was a Justice of the Peace in Charleston, which there pays a good salary. He took contracts for street paving and we believe paved most of the Charleston streets and we think he ran a photograph gallery there.
     He was a fine musician and bandleader and was well read in history and current literature and was a genial well liked and respected citizen and his death will be a matter of sorrow to a wide circle of friends in this city.

[Note: Born March 1828. Married Aug. 30, 1863 in Gallia County. "The Gates Paint Manufacturing company was founded in 1861 by James Madison Gates. In a few years he was joined by his brother, Virgil A. Gates, who came to Charleston from Gallipolis, Ohio, to help him in the store, which was then located in a one room shack on Kanawha Street. Shortly after the Civil War broke out a younger brother, George W. Gates was left in charge of the store while the older brothers went to war in the Union Army. After the war the business was moved to the corner of Summers and Virginia streets. The new building constructed in 1871 by the Gates brothers, was the first three story building in Charleston. People came from miles around to see the city's first skyscraper."]    [Note: He served in the 4th West Virginia Infantry.]

Gallipolis Daily Tribune
Thursday, Feb. 20, 1908
Transcribed by F.K. Brown                                                                                 Top of Page


Gatewood, James

Death of Capt. James Gatewood
    The venerable Capt. James Gatewood, so well and favorably known to everyone in the city, passed away at 3 o’clock in the afternoon of February 5, 1901. His funeral services will be conducted at 1:30 p.m., Thursday, by Rev. I. I. Magee at Grace M. E. Church, the interment by Wetherholt following at Mound Hill cemetery. The pall bearers for the occasion will be A.A. Lyon, J. C. Hutsinpiller, J.W. Miles, H. P. Hanna, W. W. Watts, T. P. Williams.
     Capt. Gatewood’s wife died May 3rd, 1897. Two years before in 1895 they celebrated their golden wedding anniversary. The Captain left nine children, all of an adult age, as follows: William L. Gatewood, James M. Gatewood, Mrs. Emma C. Kerns, wife for Mr. A.W. Kerns, Mrs. Kate Small, wife of Capt. Chas. H. Small, Mrs. Sabina Brading, wife of Mr. Stanley Brading, of Tennessee, Mrs. Laura Mullineux, wife of Mr. Chas. Mullineux, Charles R. Gatewood, Edgar E. Gatewood and Mrs. Nellie Bovie, wife of Mr. George Bovie, by all of whom he will be remembered as an affectionate, kind father in whom they had the greatest confidence and respect. To each of his sons he gave a farm of 200 acres, and to each of his daughters a house and lot in the city and he left $3600 of Gallipolis Furniture stock to be divided among them.
     On last January 17, he celebrated the 81th anniversary of his birth by giving a dinner at which his children and their families were present and all had a happy time. The very next day he was taken ill and he has been gradually failing with varying conditions every since, though only confined to his bed for a week. He was fully prepared for the change. He had lead a Christian life for years and he laid down to his last rest peacefully and with a well grounded faith that all was well. It is hard to surrender these fine old gentlemen to grim visage death. It seems that they, with their fine examples of virtue, probity and honor are surely needed in every community. But we can remember and revere their virtues though they sleep. Capt. Gatewood will be remembered with kindness and respect by all who knew him. He was Captain of Co. G., 1st O. H. A. and served thought the entire war.
     The following is a short sketch of his life as told by himself shortly before being taken ill:

Biographical Sketch
    I was born January 17, 1817, on Piedlar River, Amherst County, Virginia. My father moved from there to Randolph County, Va., in 1827. He moved from there to Kanawha County, W. Va., in 1831. I saw the great ice break up and flood of 1832 in Elk River, and the brilliant celestial phenomenon of falling stars on November 13, 1833. At 18 years of age I engaged in the lumber business, such whipsawing, boat building and furnishing timber to the Kanawha Salines, then in its palmy days. In the meantime I had learned the carpenter’s trade. In October, 1839, I left Virginia for Louisiana, and arrived at Port Hudson, la, in march 1840. There I commenced my trade as undertaker, and continued the business until June, 1847. In the meantime I married Miss Virginia Lowry of Gallia County, Ohio. (Oct. 12, 1845), who had spent tow years with me in the South. The later part of 1847, I bought land at Raccoon Island, Ohio and went to farming and boating wood, staves, tanbark and hoop-poles to different points, a flourishing business at that time. I continued that business until August, 1862, at which time I volunteered in the Union army and served 3 years, less 18 days. I May, 1868, I formed a company partnership with W. G. Fuller, Jno. C. Hutsinpiller and T. R. Hayward, under the firm name of Gatewood, Fuller & Co., to manufacture furniture. In December, 1868, we blew the first factory whistle that was ever sounded in this city. In 1878, I sold my interest in the factory and in 1880 build a saw mill and conducted the Gatewood Lumber Company. In 1890, the saw mill was merged into the Gallipolis Furniture factory. On Jan. 1, 1893, I retired from business and have taken pleasure in my retirement after a long and busy life. I thank the good Lord for his goodness to me, for my good health and honesty of purpose that I have been able by close attention to business to lay up enough to keep me in my old age. I am satisfied with charity for all and malice toward none.

James Gatewood

Gallipolis Daily Tribune
Wednesday, February 6 ,1901
Transcribed by Marjorie Wood                                                                        Top of Page


Gatewood, Captain James Madison

Capt. J. M. Gatewood, Last Of Union Vets, Died at 8 Last Night
     Taps has sounded for the last Gallia County veteran of the great Civil War, which ended more than 78 years ago. Captain James Madison Gatewood died at 8 o'clock last night at his home in the hills overlooking the Ohio River above Crown City. He was 95 years old on the Fourth of July last and was known to be frail and feeble; but to hundreds who had known him and knew of his remarkable career the news of his passing will be surprising and saddening.

Funeral 2 Sunday
     Funeral services will be held at the funeral parlors of George J. Wetherholt & Sons at 2 o'clock Sunday, with Rev. W. Scott Westerman in charge. Interment will be made in Mound Hill Cemetery. Decedent was a son of James Gatewood who became the pioneer in furniture making here, and Virginia Lowry Gatewood. He was born July 4, 1848 in Clay Township. But his home from the time he was a boy of nine until his death was on the site of the home where he died.
     He attended the old Gallia Academy but at the age of 17 - near the close of the Civil War-he enlisted in Co. G. 195th Ohio Volunteer Infantry. From 1866 to 1869 he served in Co. K. 23rd U.S. Infantry and his experiences for the next decade were thrilling beyond description. He served as an aide to General Cook and at one time was in the command of General George A. Custer, but was engaged in carrying the mail to frontier army posts before the Custer massacre on the Little Big Horn. He was a superb horseman in his young manhood and one of his mail routes was from Camp Harney, Oregon to Prescott, Arizona. Mr. Gatewood returned to Ohio and the old homestead in 1876 and on Christmas, 1878, he and Margaret Ann Sheets were united in marriage.
     To all his older acquaintances, Captain Gatewood was distinguished for his iron will, his alert mind and his probity and integrity. In his later years his snowy white beard and erect figure gave him a patriarchal aspect.
To his descendants Captain Gatewood must have imparted his staunch patriotism and military propensities as will be noted in looking over the list of his survivors. Not only was he a soldier and the son of a soldier but also the father and grandfather of soldiers.
     Surviving children are Perry C. Gatewood, Dayton; Virginia Gatewood, and Mrs. E. R. Housekeeper, Gary, Indiana; Mrs. K. M. Leighton, Esther Gatewood, Mrs. Trimble Jones and Melvin E. Gatewood, all of Crown City R. D.; Mrs. Dwight Ghrist, Punta Gorda, Fla.; Paul Gatewood, Toledo. Another son, Major Edward Gatewood was killed in the historic battle at Verdun, France, in the first World War. Melvin, Major and Paul are in the present war and grandsons James, Robert and Nelson Gatewood and James T. Jones are in the U. S. Airforce.
     Two brothers and three sisters also survive: Charles Gatewood, who lives just below the James Gatewood home; Edgar E. Gatewood, Everett, Washington; Mrs. Emma Kerns and Mrs. Laura Mullineaux, Gallipolis, and Mrs. Sabina Brading, Chattanooga, Tenn.
    
[Note: Death was 17 Sept. 1943]

Gallipolis Newspaper
No Date
Transcribed by Margaret Calvin


Gatewood, William L.

     William L. Gatewood died at the home of his daughter, Mrs. Fred Brown, of Marceline, MO., Monday morning, January 27, 1913, aged 66 years. He had been in failing health for some time and went to Missouri to recuperate. For a time he seemed better, but two weeks ago he began to fail. He had a stroke of paralysis Saturday night and his death followed. He was the oldest child of Capt. and Mrs. James Gatewood and was born in Louisiana.
     He came to this county when 18 years old where he had since resided. At the age of 15 he enlisted in his father's company of the Ohio Heavy Artillery and served three years. After the war he worked in his father's factory and later farmed. He was a good upright man, respected by all who knew him. He was a number of the K. of P., Odd Fellows and G. A. R.
     He is survived by James M. Gatewood, of Crown City, Mrs. A. M. Kerns, Mrs. Chas. R. Small, Mrs. Stanley Brading, of Chattanooga, Mrs. Charles Mullineux, of this city, Charles R. Gatewood on a farm near Crown City, and E. E. Gatewood, of the state of Washington, also by his wife, Mrs. Mary Short Gatewood, to whom he was married in 1873, and five children, Mrs. C. W. Stevens, of Los Angeles, Cal., Harry in Michigan, Mrs. Ira Bootom, Jr., of Brownsville, Texas, Mrs. Will Drummond of Los Angeles, Cal., and Mrs. Fred Brown.

[Note: Corporal in Co G, 1st OVHA]

The Gallipolis Bulletin
January 30, 1913
Transcribed by Irene Blamer                                                                          Top of Page


Geisler, Ernest

     It is with sincere regret that we chronicle the death of Mr. Ernest Geisler, who passed away at the home of his son-in-law and daughter, Mr. and Mrs. Harley Bovie, Tuesday evening, October 12, 1909. He had been suffering with Bright's disease for a long time and recently became worse but his death was entirely unexpected and was a great shock to his family and his numerous friends.
     Mr. Geisler was born at Halle, near Leipsic, in Saxony, Germany, on July 20, 1838. He learned the machinist trade and came to America when about 18 years of age and first found employment in a machine shop in Cincinnati. He was married to Miss Anna Stelger, at Cincinnati in 1859. When the war broke out he entered the Union army as a member of the Turner regiment of Volunteer Infantry and made an excellent record. After the war he worked in Cincinnati until 1869 when he came to Gallipolis to fit up the machinery in the woolen factory built by the late Frank LeClereq. When Capt. J. C. Hutsinpiller became manager of the Gallipolis Furniture factory, Mr. Geisler became the engineer in charge of the machinery and served faithfully for several years and then became one of the skilled employees of the Enos. Hill & Co machine shops. He remained with this firm until the waterworks were built and then started a plumbing business of his own which he conducted until ill health compelled him to sell.
     He served for 25 years as engineer of the Fire Department and always had the engines in the finest condition. He was a member of Cadot Post. The Odd Fellows and Morning Dawn Lodge F. & A. M.
     Besides his faithful wife he leaves daughters, Mrs. Henry Worman, of Green township, Mrs. George Pfeiffer, Mrs. Will Uhrig, of Cincinnati, Mrs. Ed Copeland, of Jackson, Mrs. Chris Mack and Mrs. Harley Bovie, of Gallipolis, and one son, Will Geisler, of Cincinnati, besides nine grandchildren. All of his children were here to attend his funeral.
     Mr. Geisler was a member of the Lutheran Church and in later years has looked after the property here. He was a good, kind-hearted, whole-souled gentleman, honest and square in all his business transactions and had the respect and confidence of all who knew him. His death will be sincerely regretted by those who knew him best. The funeral services were held Thursday afternoon by Rev. Thomas Maguire at the residence of Mr. and Mrs. Bovie, and all that was mortal of this good man was laid to rest in Mound Hill cemetery by Hayward & Son, under the direction of the Masonic order of which he was an honored member.

The Gallipolis Bulletin
October 15, 1909, No. 43
Transcribed by Irene Blamer


George, Archibald

     Died, near Port Gibson, on the 5th ult., of wounds received in the battle of Champion Hills, Mr. Archibald George, member of John H. Evans' Company, 56th Regiment O. V. I., and son of Hiram D. George, of this county, in the 23d year of his age. He was a faithful soldier and an honest man.

[Note: buried in Vicksburg National Cemetery]

The Gallipolis Journal
July 2, 1863
Transcribed by Eva Swain Hughes


George, J. J.

J.J. George, 84, Dies of Paralysis Stroke

Was Veteran of Civil War, and Brother of A. S. George
     J. J. George, 84 years old, died at his home near Bulaville shortly after 5 o’clock Thursday evening after a stroke of paralysis had rendered him unconscious during the greater part of the day.
     Mr. George was a veteran of the Civil war, having served three and a half years with the Ohio Heavy Artillery. He was one of ten children in his family, the only surviving brother now is A. S. George, county treasurer elect of Gallia county.
     Mr. George was married twice, and was the father of thirteen children. Besides his wife and brother he is survived by four daughters, Mrs. Rilla Smiley, of near Bulaville, and Misses Janada, Goldie and Jessie George at home; and five sons, Allen, Roy, and Jay of Columbus, Junie, Milford Center, and Gene, address unknown.
     Funeral services will be held Thursday morning at ten o’clock at Bulaville Christian church, of which he was a member. Rev. Mossman will conduct the services. Burial will be in the Rife cemetery in charge of A. F. Tope undertaker.

Gallipolis Daily Tribune
August 31, 1927
Transcribed by Henny Evans                                                                          Top of Page


George, Joseph F.

Only Brother Dead
     Mrs. Aaron Rife received the sad news Friday evening that her only brother, Joseph George, 81, a native
of Gallia County and veteran of the Civil War, had passed away at his home in Columbus, Indiana, where funeral services will be held Monday at 2 p.m. Mrs. Rife is his only surviving relative.

[Note: He served in Co. B, 82nd Indiana Infantry and was promoted from private to corporal. He died March 12, 1925 in Bartholomew County, Indiana.]

Gallipolis Daily Tribune
March 14, 1925
Transcribed by Henny Evans


George, William

     OBITUARY - William George, son of Aaron and Mary George, was born June 3, 1845, and departed this life March 1, 1922, aged 76 years, 8 months and 28 days. He was united in marriage to Juritta Kincade in 1870, who preceded him to the better land 20 years ago. To this union were born two sons, O. E. and E. M. George of Bulaville, and one daughter, Eva, who died in her eighth year, April 25, 1866.
     During the Civil War he responded to the call for volunteers, anxious to serve his country, which he willingly and faithfully did. On Jan. 21, 1869, he enlisted again as a soldier, uniting with the Campaign F. W. Church. He remained faithful in all church activities until his death and was ever a consistent Christian. For years he acted as superintendent of the Campaign Sunday School, where he put forth every effort to make it the best possible. It was while under his leadership that the Sunday School won a banner in a contest in the Meigs Quarterly meeting as to which Sunday School had the largest per cent of attendance to the enrollment. He was always present at Saturday afternoon meetings and was in constant fellowship with his Master in the home as well as at church.
     In 1904 he was united in marriage to Mrs. Eliza Turner of Dyesville, Meigs County, who survives. Besides his companion, he leaves three brothers, J. J. of Bulaville, Moses of Milford Center, and Aaron George of Gallipolis, and one sister, Mrs. Mary L. Kincade of Saugus, California, two sons and 14 grandchildren, together with a host of friends to whom his death brings a deep and personal regret.
     Funeral services were held at Dyesville, March 3, at 10 a.m., conducted by Rev. Strickland of Columbus, and at Bulaville at 3 p.m., by Rev. Ewing of Rio Grande. Burial by Wetherholt in the Rife Cemetery.

Card of Thanks
     We wish to extend our sincere thanks to those who assisted us in the sickness and death of our father, including the telephone exchanges who so patiently assisted us, and for the consoling words of the ministers. His Sons.

The Gallia Times
Thursday, March 9, 1922
Transcribed by Sandy L. Milliron

William George Dead
     William George, a native of Addison township, this county, died at his home at Dyesville, Meigs County on March first, following an illness with heart trouble. He was aged 76 years. The funeral was held at Bulaville Friday and interment was made in the churchyard cemetery.
     Mr. George is survived by his wife, two sons, Ola E. and Eddie George, a sister, Mrs. W.F. Kincade of Saugas, CA and brothers Aaron S of Gallipolis, J.J. of Bulaville and Moses of Milford Center. He was well known here and highly respected.

[Note: Death Certificate: Born June 3, 1845; died March 1, 1922 ..76 years, 8 months and 28 days. Parents Aaron George and Mary Rife]

Publication Unknown
March, 1922
Transcribed by F.K. Brown                                                                            Top of Page


Ghrist, Christopher Columbus

Death of Capt. C.C. Ghrist

     Capt. Clum Ghrist, as he was familiarly called, died at Mt. Sterling, O., last Friday and was buried there. He was a Lawrence county man and his first wife was Miss Earwood of this county. He resided in Gallipolis a number of years and was landlord of the Ecker House opposite the Court House. His wife died and he dropped that and getting his pension increased to $72 a month he lived on that being an invalid from asthma and bronchial trouble. Two or three years ago he married again at Mt. Sterling.
     By his first wife he left the following children: Nathan, Corapolis, Pa, Peter and John of Jackson, Will, of Cincinnati, and Millard here. Also two married daughters---Mrs. Frank Stein of New Orleans, Nellie, of Washington, C.H., and Mrs. Leo Burke.
     He was a soldier during the war in a Tennessee regiment and was over 70 years of age.

Gallipolis Daily Tribune
December 28, 1910
Transcribed by Henny Evans

An Old Soldier Has Passed Away

     Mr. C.C. Ghrist died at his home in Mt. Sterling, Ohio, Friday December 23, 1910, aged 68 years. He was buried there Sunday under the auspices of the G.A.R. of which he had long been a member. Mr. Ghrist was a veteran of the civil war and drew a large pension for disabilities. He had suffered acutely from asthma for a number of years and it is supposed to have caused his death. He lived here almost all of his life until about four years ago when he moved to Mt. Sterling and married. He is survived by a wife and eight children all of whom are grown. Many friends here will regret to learn of his death.

[Note: He served in Co. F, 117th OVI and then Co. F, OVHA. He is buried in Pleasant Cemetery in Madison County, Ohio.]

Gallipolis Bulletin
December 30, 1910
Transcribed by Henny Evans


Gibbs, Henry S.

Henry S. Gibbs Dead.
Old Soldier And Veteran Musician Passes To The Great Beyond.
     Henry Summerfield Gibbs, an old resident of this City, died Tuesday evening, Nov. 1, 1910, of a complication of troubles and general breakdown.
     The funeral services will be at his late residence on 2d Avenue near the Opera House, Friday at 2 P. M., conducted by Rev. Benj. Dunn of the First Baptist Church, his interment following at Mound Hill
Cemetery by Wetherholt.
     Mr Gibbs was born at Homedale, Pa., 75 years ago next April. His father and family later moved to Portsmouth. His father was a Methodist Minister and the family became quite prominent in that City. Dr. Gibbs, Henry's uncle, was a prominent dentist. Frank, a brother, became both Auditor and Treasurer of the County and Postmaster of Portsmouth and a sister became Mrs. Judge Crane.
     Henry learned the shoemaking business, then all done by hand, and came here when yet a young man. Capt. Frank Donnally says with Mr. John James, the shoe merchant, and grandfather of James Johnston, late reporter of the Journal, he was an expert on lady's work and was brought with several others who had been in the employ of C. P. Tracy & Co., in whose establishment Capt. Donnally was then a clerk.
     He came on the A. W. Quarrier in March of 1860. He was well educated and naturally a bright intellectual man and very fond of music, and belonged to the band in which were Charley Carel, Virgil Gates, H. M. Onderdonk, Felix Wood and various others. Most of the band enlisted for the war in the 4th Va. O. V. I. Capt. A. O. Mauck's Company and was in General Lightburn's famous retreat down the Kanawha Valley from Charleston, driven out by Gen. Henry A. Wise. We think the band was disbanded after that, but can't distinctly recall, and Mr. Gibbs re-enlisted perhaps in the 141st O. V. I. and then that time was out re-enlisted again in 100 day service and was at Barboursville, to the end of the war, when he was honorably discharged.
     Right after the war he was united in marriage with Miss Florence Gillespie, of Rodney, who, with children, Mrs. Ellen Carroll, Mrs. Rose Holtslander and Miss Lulu Gibbs and Roy Carroll, a grandson survive him. His son Frank died eight years ago and Nellie in infancy. None of his parents' family survive.
     Mr. Gibbs was employed in all the best shoe stores of the City, Dages, Maxon, James and Thomas Mc Cafferty, and always commanded the best wages for work. As is known the machine made shoe took precedence in after years, and the shoe shops became as now mere cobling shops, but Mr. Gibbs had lots of friends and lots of work down to about ten years ago, when his health failed him and he has lived principally upon his pension for services rendered during the war. In the past ten years he has been much afflicted but he was courageous and cheerful. He was of an untiring nature, but always kind and affectionate, good natured, broad minded, philosophical, upright and honest. He never gave one of his family, it is said by them, a cross word.
     He was a student of good literature and read much until his eyesight failed him five years ago. This was a great blow to him for he loved good books. He had a large vein of humor in his make up and was a splendid peformer on the stage, and we believe was the promoter of an amateur ministrel company once that bore his name and which was quite a local sensation. He was a great musician and loved the violin on which he was quite proficient and only a year or so ago went about with Col. Pattee of Huntington with a troupe of amatures known as "The Old Time Fiddlers." He could not refrain from a good joke even on his death bed. He was taken down two weeks ago today, and gradually grew worse from day to day, passing away peacefully and conscious up to a few moments before the end. All who knew Henry S. Gibbs will hear of his death with sorrow.

Gallipolis Daily Tribune
Volume XVI
Number 249
November 2, 1910
Gallipolis, Ohio

Transcribed By: MLT                                                                                     Top of Page


Gibson, Norman

Norman Gibson Died
     Norman Gibson, Sr., an old resident of Henderson died Friday, August 27th, after an illness of seven months from infirmities due to old age. The deceased was born May 23, 1836, in Gallia county, Ohio, and was aged 84 years, 3 months and 4 days. His parents were Samuel and Agnes Gibson. He was united in marriage Oct. 20, 1856, to Sophie McKeeuer [possibly McKever] of Scioto county, O. To this union were born nine children, three sons and six daughters, all of whom with his wife survive.
     Mr. Gibson had been a black smith during his life time and for forty-seven years had been a resident of Henderson. He was a member of the I.O.O.F. lodge and was a devoted christian, being a member of the Christian Church for many years. He was an old U.S. soldier, being a member of the seventh Ohio Cavalry.

[Note: He is buried in Henderson Cemetery in Henderson, West Virginia.]

Gallipolis Daily Tribune
August 28, 1920
Transcribed by Henny Evans


Gibson, William W.

     GIBSON – William W. Gibson, son of John Gibson, was born in Meigs County, Ohio, June 25, 1819, and died at the home of his son, John P. in the city of Jackson, Ohio, May 24, 1901, aged 81 years, 11 months. He was married to Miss Margaret Sarah Cox of Somerville, Nicholas County, W.Va., Nov. 15, 1844. To this union were born nine children, four of whom passed on before him. P.H. of Cox, Ohio, J.P. of Jackson, Ohio, A.P. of Chillicothe, Ohio, Eliza and Alice of Hawk’s Station, Ohio, with the feeble mother live to mourn their loss.
     When quite young, his father moved to Sutten, Braxton Co., W.Va., where he remained until the Spring of 1862, during which time we learn he was twice elected Sheriff of said county. Being loyal to his country, advocating principles adverse to his rebel neighbors, to save the life of himself and family, on the night of June 23, 1862, he left his pleasant home with all its belongings, taking with him his wife, and six little children. Groping their way through midnight darkness, he placed them in a canoe and launched out in the swift current of Elk River. At the dawn of day they were fired on several times by rebel bush whackers but none were hurt. Finally they reached Charleston, W.Va., where they found the Union army, where he remained as teamster for the post until Gen. Lightburn was driven out to Point Pleasant.
     He and his family came to Gallipolis and remained there for several years. He next moved to Jackson County where he has lived ever since. For a few years past he was badly afflicted, during which time he was never known to murmur or complain, fully trusting in Him who doeth all things well. To all questions asked him regarding the future state, his answers were of such nature as to satisfy the most doubting ones of the reality of God’s love for his children and that he too was in covenant favor with Him.
     His funeral took place on Sunday afternoon at 1:30 o’clock from the residence of his son, J. P. Gibson, in this city. A large number of friends and neighbors attended, who took this method of showing their respect to the memory of the deceased and sympathy for the family. The services were conducted in a very impressive manner by Rev. M. D. Vaughn. His remains were interred in the Pierce graveyard.

Standard-Journal, Jackson, Ohio
May 29, 1901
Transcribed by Donna Scurlock                                                                        Top of Page


Gilber, Abraham

      Abraham Gilbert, at his home in Northup village, October 19, 1886, of flux.  He leaves a loving wife, four children, and a host of friends and relatives to mourn their loss.  He was buried at the Northup Cemetery.  The Leaper Post, G.A.R., conducted the burial services. Mr. Gilbert was a practical farmer, a good citizen and highly respectled by all who knew him. 

[Note: 141st OVI]

Gallipolis Journal
October 27, 1886
Transcribed by Teresa Herrmann

Gilbert, Abraham

In Memory
     Of Mr. Abraham Gilbert, who died at his home in Northup Village, Oct. 19, 1886, in the 59th year of his age. He leaves a kind wife and four children, three sons and one daughter and many relatives and friends to mourn their loss.  He was buried in Northup graveyard October 20, a large concourse of relatives and friends attending to pay a last tribute of respect to his memory.

Death has been among us, friends,
And taken off our neighbor,
From all the cares of this world,
And from his wonted labor.

Thy wife and children's tears,
May mingle over the clay;
Midst all their cares and all their fears,
They could not have thee stay.

Look up, dear friends, be comforted,
And calm your troubled mind,
For those who go are happier far,
Than those who stay behind.

Then farewell, husband and father dear,
Though thee no more we see,
We pray that thou mayst rest in peace,
In God's eternity.

                                           Dora

[Note: Northup Graveyard is also known as Rose Cemetery]

Gallipolis Journal
Oct. 27, 1886
Transcribed by F.K. Brown                                                                             Top of Page


Gilkinson, George

     George Gilkinson, an old army veteran, died at his home, near Crown City on Thursday of last week, of consumption, and was buried at the Fowler graveyard on Friday following.

[Note: He died March 4, 1897. He served in Co. C, 10th Kentucky Volunteer Cavalry. He is buried in Good Hope Cemetery.]

Gallipolis Journal
March 13, 1897
Transcribed by Henny Evans


Gill, Daniel

     Uncle Dan Gill has been called from this life. His death occurred Tuesday evening, Feb. 2, at 7 o'clock at the Good Samaritan Hospital at Cincinnati and the sad event was painful news to all that knew him. His death was not unexpected, as he had been struggling between life and death for a long while, though the announcement was a shock to his folks, as he had been better than usual that week. Deceased was a remarkable man, and possessed of many noble qualities. No one ever asked assistance of him that was ever refused and his charitable acts were many and made with an unstinted hand.
     Daniel Gill was born at St. Clairsville, Belmont county, O., March 25, 1825, and was the youngest son of Mr. and Mrs. Samuel Gill, the latter dying when he was three years old. He went to Mt. Pleasant when quite young as an apprentice and there completed his apprenticeship as a harness and saddle maker. It was here that he met and was wed to his wife in 1853. The result of this union was the birth of three children, two of whom survive -- Mrs. Arna Gilbert, of Crown City, and J. V. Gill, of this city. He came to this county in March, '57, and settled in Harrison township, on the farm of the late John Leeper, until he removed to this city. Uncle Dan was an industrious man and until the hand of affliction was laid on him was never found idle. After he had raised a crop he would come to town and follow the river as a livelihood during the winter. He steered coal-boats down the Ohio and Mississippi for a good many years and was known quite well at every port. He was a successful farmer and when he moved here vacated a fertile and profitable farm.
     He moved to this city in September, '94, and has since made his home with his son, J. V. Gill, who now resides on Vine street. He has been in declining health since '88. However, he bero [bore] his sufferings patiently, and though he knew his end was near at hand he awaited the summons with perfect resignation. He was taken to Cincinnati six weeks ago to submit to an operation for urinary trouble. It was made there at the Good Samaritan Hospital, and the doctors were encouraged until he had a relapse, and at the hour above stated passed away. The news of his death was telegraphed by Dr. William Howell Wednesday morning. His remains were taken in charge by the Knights of Pythias there, of which order he was a member, prepared for burial and expressed here Thursday. The funeral was under the auspices of the Knights at Macedonia cemetery in Harrison township, Rev. John Porter officiating. The body was met by a committee from Naomi Lodge, and conveyed to the home by undertaker Wetherholt.

[Note: Co. K, 78th Ohio Volunteer Infantry]

Gallipolis Journal
February 9, 1897 Vol. LXII, No. 17
Transcribed by Irene Blamer                                                                          Top of Page


Gillette, Paschal F.

Fine Old Soldier Dead; Member of Lincoln's Body Guard Dies at Kanauga
     P. F. Gillette of Kanauga, in his 80th year, died of pneumonia Friday. He was an ex-recorder of Lawrence county, was one of Abraham Lincoln's body guards during the war, and assisted in the capture of his assassin. He served during the war in the 26th Ohio Volunteer Cavalry. Mr. Gillette died at the home of his daughter, Mrs. L. J. Guthrie, and will be buried Sunday at Gravel Hill after services at the residence at 2 p.m. by the Rev. Mr. Lightner. He leaves also a son Charles at Newark, and a brother and sister. Wetherholt has charge of this fine old gentleman's remains.

Memoir, Paschal F. Gillette
     The subject of this memoir, Paschal F. Gillette, son of Lawrence and Aurilia McClure Gillette, was born Dec. 22, 1835, in Rome, Lawrence Co., Ohio, and entered into rest at the home of his daughter, Mrs. Leverett J. Guthrie, Kanauga Sta., Gallia Co., O., Oct 1, 1915. He was united in marriage to Maria Radford McGonagle, Dec. 22, 1862. Of this union two children were born, Chas. A. of Newark, O., and Georgia Anna, both living.
     The mother passed on to the better land March 4, 1907. After the death of his beloved companion, he made his home with his daughter, moving from Ironton, O., to Kanauga Sta. in 1910. His last illness was of short duration and the loving tender services of his dear ones were truly a labor of love, and the end was peace.
     He heard the call of his country and was one of the first to respond, enlisting in the 2nd O.V.C., Oct. 1861 and served until Sept. 11th, 1865. when he was honorably discharged at Washington, D.C. He saw service in 14 states and territories and was in 33 engagements, and proved himself to be a soldier indeed, always enduring as a good, true and brave defender of his country. He was a member of the personal guard of President Lincoln, and was in Washington at the time of the assassination. He was commissioned Com. Sergeant in the Q. M. Dept. at Washington. He was wounded at Monticello, Ky., 1863.
     After his discharge he returned to his native heath, Lawrence Co., O., where he lived a useful and honorable life respected by all who knew him. His countrymen elected him Recorder of Lawrence Co., for two terms. The last five years of his life were spent amid the quietude of rural life where he loved the flowers, fruits and foliage all around him, and after having served his generation according to the will of God, he like one of old, was gathered to his fathers. In every relation of life, as son, father, husband, soldier, citizen and churchman, he was one of God's noblemen. The loved ones who remain have been left a rich heritage by the departed father. He was especially devoted to his two grandsons, Raymond and Franklin Guthrie, and may they ever emulate his virtues and be true to God and country as their grandfather. Funeral services were held at the home of Mrs. L. J. Guthrie. Interment at Cheshire, Rev. Lightner officiating.

"Soldier rest! thy warfare o'er,
Sleep the sleep that knows not breaking;
Dream of battle fields no more,
Days of danger, nights of waking.
Soldier, rest! thy warfare o'er
Dream of fighting fields no more;
Sleep the sleep that knows not breaking
Morn of toil nor night of waking.

     Mr. Gillette was a member of the M.E. Church from childhood, and also a member of Persian Conclave No. 4, Heptasophs, or Seven Wise Men, of Ironton. O. Five brothers of this order, Messrs. Arthurs, Kurts, Schweickart, Haggerty and Huddle, were present and acted as pallbearers at the residence. He leaves one brother, Revillo Gillette of Proctorville, O., and a half brother and sister-F. Radford of Kansas City and Mrs. John Rucker of Huntington W.Va.

The Galipolis Tribune,
Friday, October 8, 1915

Records of Gravel Hill Cemetery, Cheshire, Ohio:
P. F. Gillette b. 1835 d. 1915
Maria Gillette b. 1835 d. 1907
Transcribed by Eve Hughes
Also submitted by Mark Taylor                                                                       Top of Page


Gillingam, B.D.

     B.D. Gillingham was born about 1834 and he enlisted in Co. L, 7th Ohio volunteer Cavalry on August 30, 1862. He lived in Clay Township in 1860. He was taken prisoner of war at Rogersville, Tennessee on November 6, 1863 and died of disease at Andersonville Prison April 18, 1864. He is buried in Andersonville National Cemetery.

Obit constructed from soldier records and newspaper article
Gallipolis Journal
January 19,1865
Constructed by Henny Evans


Gillingham, James

Death of James Gillingham
     Mr. James Gillingham died at the home of his nephew, Mr. Jos. Thompson, at Huntington Sunday morning, Jan. 31, 1904, after a long illness of enlargement of the liver age 62 years. The remains were brought here Monday morning and conveyed to the home of his brother-in-law, Rev. John Porter, where services were conducted, interment following at Cottrell graveyard by Wetherholt.
     He was a veteran of the civil war, having been a member of the 7th Ohio Cavalry, and was an honest, industrious citizen with a wide circle of friends who will sincerely mourn his death. He was in this city a few weeks ago attending to some business matters and called on the writer, to whom he had been a great friend. At that time he was sanguine of recovering his health though in a very feeble condition.
     His wife, who was a Miss Guilbert, and a sister of Mrs. J. C. Ingels, Mrs. June Plymale and Mrs. Hugh Plymale, died several years ago, leaving two daughters, Mrs. Geo. Brammer and Miss Mina, of Huntington, and one son, Chauncey, who was killed by a train at Columbus about a year ago. The relatives will have the sympathy of a legion of friends in their bereavement.

Gallipolis Bulletin
February 5, 1904
Transcribed by Margaret Calvin                                                                        Top of Page


Gills, Edwin LeRoy

Death of Mr. Edwin L. Gills
     Mr. Edwin LeRoy Gills, whose varying conditions of health been so frequently mentioned in the papers, passed away, to the great distress of family relatives and a host of friends, Saturday evening at 6:30, November 10, 1900.
     His funeral services were conducted at Grace M.E. Church, at one o'clock, this Monday afternoon, by Rev. L.L. Magee, the pastor of the church, the interment following at Mound Hill by Undertaker Wetherholt, under the auspices of the Knights of Pythias of Naomi Lodge, No. 55, of which he was a charter member. The pall bearers who laid him away to rest were Messrs. E. Lincoln Neal, Will Horner, Will Clendenin, David T. Davis, J.C. Hutsinpiller and Geo. s. Berridge. There was also an honorary escort, and a turn out of members of the Grand Army of the Republic, of which organization he was also a member.
     Mr. Gills was born in Green township, June 1st, 1846, and was the son of James and Julia Gills. He became a carpenter by trade, and has been a resident of this city since 1860, and an employee of the Fuller & Hutsinpiller furniture company for eleven years prior to two years ago, when his health failed and since which he has been in an invalid condition from lung trouble and incapacitated for labor of any kind. For six weeks prior to his death he was confined to his bed. He had been a member of the Methodist Church for sixteen years, and was ready for the change that must come to all, and bade his family an affectionate and touching farewell till they meet above. During the rebellion he served his country in Capt. Cole Gillilan's Company C of the 173d O.V.I., and drew a pension for disabilities incurred for his country's sake.
     He was united in marriage July 13, 1875, with Miss Annie V. Ralph, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. E. Perry Ralph, and their union was a happy one, he proving a kind and loving husband. Their union was blessed with six children, four surviving--J. Lewis, Edna F., James and Harry, and by them he will be remembered as a kind and indulgent parent. He also left to mourn their great bereavement, two brothers, Messrs. J.F. and M.F. Gills, and two sisters, Mrs. Wm. McConnell and Mrs. Marion Blazer.
     He bore his twenty-eight months of illness with Christian fortitude, and was patient and uncomplaining. Outside of all family relations, he was known by acquaintances as an upright, conscientious, companionable gentleman, at whose death profound regret was universal.

Gallipolis Weekly Tribune
November 16, 1900
Transcribed by Henny Evans


Gills, James

     Mr. James Gills died last Saturday morning, February 8, 1902, after a long illness. Deceased was a native of Bedford County, Va., and was 78 years of age, 65 of which he had spent in this county. When the great war broke out he enlisted in Co. B, 91st Ohio, and served three years. For many years he had been a consistent member of the Methodist Church. He was a kind, indulgent husband and father and an upright citizen. In 1844 he was married to Miss Julia A. Blazer and unto this union nine children were born, of whom the wife and five children survive him, viz., J. F. Gills, Anna L. McConnell, F. M. Gills, Emma M. Blazer and J. T. Gills. The funeral services were conducted at the late home, on the neighborhood road, by Rev. Gordon, interment at Mound Hill by Hayward & Son.

[Note: from stone born November 18, 1824]

Gallipolis Bulletin
February 14, 1902 Vol. XXXV No. 16
Transcirbed by Irene Blamer                                                                          Top of Page


Gilmore, Frank

Death of Frank Gilmore.
       Mr. Frank Gilmore, of near Bethel, Ohio Township, died Tuesday morning May 31, 1910, of a chronic ailment, which had made him an invalid for the last two or three years.  He was an old soldier of the 86th Ohio and was about 70 years old.  He left a wife and a family of grown up children and was a very nice man.  He served through the war and recieved disabilities that caused his death.  His funeral services were conducted under the direction of the G. A. R., Wednesday afternoon by Rev. Floyd Dailey and the interment was at Bethel Church.

Gallipolis Daily Tribune
Volume XVI
Number 134
June 2, 1910
Gallipolis, Ohio

Transcribed by: Michael L. Trowbridge


Gilmore, Thomas Benton

Former Local Teacher Dies in Huntington
Thos. B. Gilmore Spent Most of His Active Years in Gallia County
     Thomas Benton Gilmore....Eighty-six years old, Civil War veteran and retired farmer, who resided with his daughter, Mrs. J.R. Patterson, 201 Thirty third street, died Thursday morning at the home of his son Thomas A. (Burt) Gilmore 245 Eighth avenue. Death followed a stroke of paralysis. Since the death of his wife eight years ago Mr. Gilmore has resided here with his daughter.
     He was born in Gallia county, O., on November 4, 1841. Most of the active years of his life were spent in and near Gallipolis. For more than 40 years he was a public school teacher there. He also was a successful farmer and was interested in various business enterprises. Mr. Gilmore was a staunch and active member of the Democratic party. He moved to Huntington in 1903 and at that time retired from all business activity. For more than 60 years he was a member of the Christian church.
     Funeral services were conducted Saturday afternoon at 2:30 o'clock from the home of his son Otis L. Gilmore, 2676 Collis avenue. Dr. W.H. Sheffer officiated. Burial was at Woodmere cemetery. Huntington Herald Dispatch

[Note: His Civil War draft card was found; it is possible that he served in a WV Unit.]

Gallipolis Daily Tribune
April 7, 1928
Transcribed by Henny Evans                                                                          Top of Page


Glassburn, Nelson

Reached Good Age
     Mr. Nelson Glassburn, 84, one of Vinton's well known and highly respected citizens, passed away on last Tuesday evening after a two weeks' illness. He is highly spoken of by all who knew him in life, and he is now doubtless enjoying the reward of a long life rightly lived.

[Note: He served as Squirrel Hunter. He is buried in Wood Cemetery in Huntington Township, July 8, 1831-November 18, 1914.]

Gallia Times
November 25, 1914
Transcribed by Henny Evans


Gleason, Hiram

Headq'rs 173d O.V.I., Nashville, Tenn., December 17th 1864

     At a meeting of the officers and members of Co. I, 173d O.V.I., in which Captain Samuel Welker, was called to the chair, the following resolutions were adopted:

Whereas: It has pleased Almighty God to call from our midst, by a mysterious Providence our worthy comrade, Hiram Gleason, of Huntington Tp., Gallia Co., and private in Co. I, 173d O.V.I. Therefore,
Resolved, That while we recognize the Divine Wisdom in this inscrutable Providence, and meekly bow to this sad allotment that we sincerely regret the loss of one, who, bore his part so well, and exhibited those soldierly qualities which endeared him, to all his comrades in arms
Resolved: That we tender our christian condolence to his friends, and that the secretary be instructed to present a copy of these resolutions to his relations, and the Gallipolis Journal and Dispatch, for publication.
     Capt. S. Welker, Pres.
     Geo W. Isaminger Chaplain and sec'y.

[Note: He is buried in Nashville National Cemetery. He was born about 1845 died of disease on December 7, 1864.]

The Gallipolis Journal
December 29, 1864
Transcribed by Eva Swain Hughes                                                                 Top of Page


Gleason, Rile

     The grim monster death has made several calls in the vicinity of Vinton lately. Rile Gleason, an old soldier, was buried by Corwin Post Sunday, 30th.

[Note: 12/25/1830 - 12/28/1894 Buried at Brush Cemetery, Gallia Co., Ohio]

The Gallipolis Journal
Vinton News Notes
January 9, 1895
Transcribed by Sandy L. Milliron


Glenn, Addison Newell
 
A.N. Glenn Dead 
     A.N. Glenn died at his home in this city Sunday night at the age of 65 years, 3 months, and 26 days, of pneumonia after an illness of a few weeks.
     Addison N. Glenn was born in Gallia County, Ohio, September 16, 1839. At the outbreak of the civil war, he enlisted as a private, and September 1, 1862, was promoted to first sergeant, and on May 4, 1863, was again promoted to second lieutenant, and was again on January 1, 1864, promoted to first lieutenant in Company M of the engineer corps. He was discharged at Atlanta, Ga., on October 31, 1864, after having been in all the engagements in which his company took part.
     Mr. Glenn had lived in this city for a number of years, formerly being in the implement business, but of late years had been on the retirement list. He had many warm friends to learn of his death. Short funeral services were held at the M.E. church Monday afternoon at 3 o’clock by the pastor, Rev. W. T. Cline, after which the body was shipped to Mound City, Mo., for burial. The sympathy of the entire community is extended to the bereaved wife and other relatives.

[Note: He served in Co. H, 25th Missouri Infantry and transferred to Co. M, Missouri 1st Engineers. He died in either Falls City, Richardson County or in the neighboring county Pawnee in DuBois, Nebraska, the two most southeastern counties of Nebraska. He is buried in Mount Hope Cemetery in Holt County, Missouri.] 

The Falls City (Nebraska) Tribune
March 17, 1905
Transcribed by Deanna Partlow


Glenn, M. K.

M. K. Glenn
Passes Beyond the Veil Where the Ranks are Never Broken
     "Taps have sounded, the last roll is called" and M.K. Glenn has answered the final summons of the Great Commander who said "come." About two weeks ago, Mr Glenn was taken suddenly ill and medical aid was at once called and everything within human skill and power was done to alleviate his sufferings and to prolong life, but all to no avail and on Thursday night, when his Savior came he found him waiting and the soul of this dear old man winged its way to that home not built with hands--eternal is the heavens.
     "Uncle Kim" as he was well known by all, was of an amiable, genial nature and a friend to everyone. He had no enemies; his home life was ideal and his kindly influence [missing words] home. The old, the middle aged and the young, all were his friends, and the radiance of his life will shine down the long visits of years as a blessed memory in the hearts of all those whose lives were enriched by his kindly influence. We, as friends, who will miss him so much, know that there is a vacuum in the hearts of his family which never can be filled, but there is a solace in the kindly words of Him who has said, "Blessed are they who die in the Lord".
     Milton Kimble Glenn, the son of James and Polly Glenn and was born Jan. 12, 1832 and departed this life, April 15, 1909; aged 77 years, 3 months and 3 days. He was married Jan. 6, 1853, to Sarah Ellen Lewis. To this union were born two children, James and Mandane, the latter having about twenty years ago preceded him to that realm of perpetual day.
     Mr. Glenn's army record shows that he was loyal to his country, having answered his country's call early. He enlisted and was mustered in as a member of Co. B., 36th O.V.I. at Camp Putman, Marietta, Ohio; Aug. 12, 1861 and for three years faithfully served his country. The following being a few of the hard fought battles in which he was engaged, Louisburg, Bull Run, Antienam, Stone Mountain, Fredericksburg, Chickamauga, Mission Ridge and Lookout Mountain, besides many minor engagements.
     His homelife was one of simplicity and worthy of imitation. On the death of his daughter, Mandane, there was given to him and his good wife the care of her two children, Frank R. Atkinson and Miss Byrd, now Mrs. Ed Phillips, to whom they gave every care and attention, loving them as only parents could their own children, until about six years ago the grim messenger of death entered their home, taking his dear companion home, where she now waits to welcome him and where there will never more be sorrow and death.
     Besides a host of relatives and friends he leaves one son, James, three grandchildren and one great-grandchild to mourn his death, but they can but realize that their loss is His gain.
     The last sad rites were held Sunday at 10:30 a.m. at his late home, conducted by Rev. J.W. Briscoe, pastor of the M.E. Church. The burial services were under the direction of Crowin Post #259 G.A.R., of which the deceased was an honored member, being Commander of the Post at the time of his demise. The interment took place in Glenn Burying Ground by Undertaker H.K. Butler.
     Six old comrades as follows assumed the duties of pallbearers: C. C. Coy, Martin Freshcorn, Wm. Cahoon, Rich Hartsook, Sanford Viers and J.C. Spires.

[Note: Tombstone is in Old Holcomb Cemetery in Huntington Township]

Vinton Paper
April 22, 1909
Transcribed by F.K. Brown                                                                            Top of Page


Glover, Samuel

Civil War Veteran Dies
     Samuel Glover, 83, died at 5 a.m. Saturday at his home in Maple Shade. He was a veteran of the Civil War. Funeral services will be held at Clay Chapel Sunday at 2 o'clock with burial following them by Geo. J. Wetherholt and sons.

[Note: He served in Co. A, 173rd Ohio Volunteer Infantry.]

Gallipolis Daily Tribune
June 2, 1928
Transcribed by Henny Evans


Goddard, Francis

Sudden Death
     Mr. Francis Goddard, engaged in the grocery business at the corner of Second and Spruce Streets, died very suddenly last Sunday morning, September 18th. During the week previous he had been complaining of twitching of the flesh and rapid beating of the heart. On Saturday night he retired as usual and on Sunday morning arose, made the kitchen fire, went after milk, and assisted in getting breakfast. Shortly afterward he was seized suddenly with the same symptoms that had bothered him before, accompanied with profuse perspiration. His son Reese was summoned and hastened to his side. He found his father rubbing his breast. When he saw his son he said: "Reese, I'm gone." Active remedies were applied, but without avail, and in a few minutes he was dead.
     Mr. Goddard was about 78 years of age, and was a favorite with all who knew him. He was a soldier, and for disability received in the service drew a pension of $17 per month. His burial was under the direction of the G.A.R., and was largely attended. During the present year death has claimed four members of the Goddard family. Leonard, a son, died in February; Mrs. Goddard died in May; William, a son, was killed by lightning in June, and now the sudden death of the father. Reese,a son, and three daughters are left.

[Note: He served in Company H, 1st WV Infantry and is buried in Mound Hill Cemetery, 1814-Sept. 18, 1892.]

Gallipolis Bulletin
September 24, 1892
Transcribed by Henny Evans


Goetting, Christopher

     Mr. Christopher Goetting died suddenly last Saturday at the home of his daughter-in-law, Mrs. R. L. Goetting, at Marion, Ohio, while seated in a rocking chair. He suffered an attack of cerebral and pulmonary hemorrhage and was found with blood gushing from his eyes, ears, nose and mouth. Mr. Goetting had been in failing health for some time and last December went to Marion. He was an upright, kindly old gentleman and leaves many friends and relatives to mourn his demise.
     The remains wer brought to Rodney Monday and the funeral services conducted the same afternoon by Rev. Smith and Rev. J. W. McCormick. The burial occurred at the family burying ground by Undertaker Glassburn.

[Note: from stone born March 21, 1828; died February 1905; Goetting Cemetary Springfield Twp.; served with the Squirrel Hunter army in the Civil War]

Gallipolis Bulletin
March 3, 1905 Vol. XXXVIII No. 17
Transcirbed by Irene Blamer                                                                          Top of Page     


Goins, Thomas

     Mr. Thomas Goins, the well known colored barber, was found dead in bed Monday morning. He had been in his usual health and Sunday had taken a long walk in the country with his brother. Death was the result of heart trouble.
     He was 65 years of age, a veteran of the civil war and had been a resident of Gallipolis for over 50 years, coming here from Illinois. He is survived by three sons Harry, Homer and George and one brother and one sister. He was a good citizen and many friends deplore his sudden end.

[Note: Born August 10, 1843 died December 1908; Co B, 92nd O.V.I.]

Gallipolis Bulletin
December 18, 1908 Vol XLI No. 51
Transcibed by Irene Blamer


Goolden, Thos.

     Thos. Goolden, of Ohio Township, died Monday from the effects of cancer. The funeral was held at the home of his son, James Goolden, Tuesday afternoon by Rev. John Porter. Burial at Bethel cemetery by Lewis Evans. He was 71 years old and an old soldier of the 7th O. C.

Gallipolis Bulletin
September 8, 1905
Transcribed by Irene Blamer

Goolden, Thomas A.

     Thomas A. Gooldin, who was born April 12th, 1834; departed this life September 4th, 1905, aged 71 years, 4 months and 12 days. He was married to Rebecca Kerr Oct. 24, 1867, who with one child preceded him to the glory world. There survives him one daughter, Elizabeth Holsten, and two sons, J. A. and Wesley Gooldin.
     Mr. Gooldin was a soldier of the civil war, a member of the 7th Ohio Cavalry, Co. L. He was a good and kind father and well respected. We will miss him in our community. The funeral services were conducted by Rev. John L. Porter, and burial at Bethel by Lewis Evans.

[Note: Ohio Twp.]

Gallipolis Bulletin
September 22, 1905
Transcribed by Irene Blamer                                                                          Top of Page


Gordon, Alexander

Alexander Gordon
     Alexander Gordon was born May 29, 1838, at Rockbridge, Va., and died June 21, 1911, at his home in Arlee, W. Va., aged 73 years and 22 days. He was married Feb. 1, 1864, to Sarah Ralph. To this union were born ten children, 7 girls and 3 boys, Ella Roush and Gusta Scott of Cheshire, Hettie Roush, Lottie Poston and Gena Vance of Plain City, Jessie McCarty of Hanlin, Pa., Minnie Pearson, John, Hays and Emory of Arlee, W. Va. He also leaves 39 grand children and 3 great grandchildren, and one brother, Peter Gordon of Arlee.  
     He was a kind father and loving husband and a good neighbor and his death is mourned by a host of friends, but our loss is his gain.
     Mr. Gordon joined the Second Kyger Free Will Baptist Church at an early age. He bore his sickness with much patience and said that he was ready to go. He served his country in the Civil War in Co. I, 4th Virginia.
     The funeral was held at Poplar Church in Cheshire township Friday afternoon conducted by Rev. W. J. Fulton, burial in the church cemetery by undertaker Hix.

[Note: Buried Poplar Ridge Cheshire Twp.]

Gallipolis Bulletin
June 29, 1911
Transcribed by Margaret Calvin & Irene Blamer


Gothard, James

Death of James Gothard
     James Gothard, an old soldier died at his home at Crown City Thursday morning, Oct. 2, 1913, aged 82 years. A sudden attack of heart disease was the cause of his demise.
     The funeral was held Friday and the remains were laid to rest near Mercerville by undertaker Stevers.
     He is survived by widow and three sons and one daughter in Arkansas.
     Mr. Gothard was a Civil War Veteran and the news of his death will be received with regret by his many friends.

[Note: Feb. 24, 1842 to Oct. 5 1913. Buried in Pine Grove Cemetery in Mercerville...Death Certificate shows born April 22, 1830 in Gallia County; died Oct. 2, 1913...age 83 years 5 months and 10 days of age. Parents: Robert Gothard and (unknown first name) Page...both born in VA..informant was Emily Dawson]

Gallipolis Journal
Oct. 10, 1913
Transcribed by F.K. Brown                                                                            Top of Page


Grady, Francis M.

     F.M. Grady, an old soldier died at his home in the 5th ward on Saturday morning last, 55 years old. His
funeral was held in the Methodist church on Sunday forenoon, by the G.A.R. Rev. T.B. white officiated.

Meigs County newspaper
1893
Transcribed by Henny Evans

     Grady...At his home in the Fifth ward, on the morning of the 18th inst., F.M. Grady,aged 55 years.
Funeral services were held at the M.E. church Sunday forenoon under the offices of the G.A.R., conducted by Rev. T.B. White.

[Note: He served in Co. A, 56th Ohio Volunteer Infantry. He died February 17/18, 1893 in Middleport, Meigs
county, Ohio and was born about 1839.]

Meigs County newspaper
February 1893
Transcribed by Henny Evans


Grafton, James

     We regret to chronicle the death of Capt. James Grafton, who passed away at his home at Centreville Sunday morning, May 15, 1904, after several months illness with cancer of the stomach. Capt. Grafton came to this county from Wellsville before the war. He served as Captain of Company D, 179th. O.V.I. and was wagonmaster on the Kanawha for a long time.
     He had been twice married, his first wife being Miss Biglow and the second was Susan Eagle, both of whom are deceased. Since the death of his last wife, his step-daughter, Mrs. Hattie Donally, has taken care of his home.
     He leaves one sister, Rachel Malone, at Wellsville, Ohio. Mrs. Gillingham, mother of the late Thomas and James Gillingham, was also a sister.
     After the war, Capt. Grafton engaged in business at Centreville, conducting a large general store with a big trade. He served as postmaster and made a good record. He was an honorable, upright man, kind and generous and will be sadly missed in the community. He was cheerful and jovial and always had a good story to tell. He was a staunch Democrat and several times was placed on the county ticket. As a candidate for Sheriff he was beaten only 18 votes, so great was his popularity.
     He was a thoroughly good man and his death will be deeply regretted by all who knew him. The funeral services were conducted at Centreville Tuesday morning under the auspices of the Odd Fellows, of which he was an honored member and a large concourse of friends attended the last sad rites.

Gallipolis Bulletin
Friday, May 20, 1904
Transcribed by F.K. Brown                                                                             Top of Page


Grandstaff, John S.

     John Grandstaff aged 18 years. Enlisted from Walnut township 26th of August, 1863 in Co. B, 91st O.V.I. and was killed at the battle of Winchester, Va., on the 19th of September 1864. Unmarried.

[Note: This was taken from a list of soldiers who died in the war. Another source said he was killed at Opequan, Virginia and is buried at Winchester National Cemetery in Winchester, Virginia,]

Gallipolis Journal
August 24, 1865
Transcribed by Eva Swain Hughes


Graham, Phillip

     Phillip Graham was born December 30th, 1838, and died of consumption, at his father's residence, in Green township, April 15th, 1869. His last illness was long and painful—he having for several weeks, been confined to his room, yet murmured not, but was resigned to the will of God. He was not alarmed at the approach of death, but called his friends to him and exhorted them to meet him in Heaven, saying, "Glory; I am almost home; I'll soon see mother." He died trusting in Jesus.
              S. B. Mathews

[Note: Co. G, 1st OVHA; buried in Centenary Cemetery]

The Gallipolis Journal
April 29, 1869
Transcribed by Eva Swain Hughes


Graves, William Thomas

     William Thomas was born at Porter, Gallia County, Ohio, December 3, 1843 and died at Middleport on January 4, 1929, being 85 years one month and one day of age. He enlisted during the Civil War and served valiantly in Company B, 91st Regiment of Ohio Infantry.
     He was married October 30th, 1873 to Melissa Butcher, of Vinton County. To this union were born six children. Three of the children have preceded him in death. They were: George, Chancey, and Clara. The other three: Pearl Graves of Middleport, Will Graves of Middleport, and Mrs. Sarah Strickler of Bowling Green, remain to mourn his passing. His wife preceded him in death, going to her reward five years ago last May. Besides these three children, he leaves to mourn his loss, five brothers: Charles of California, M.E. of Florida, L.H. of Huntington, Henry of Charleston, and John of Columbus, and six grandchildren and one great grand child.
     He has been a member of the Church of Christ of Middleport since 1915. He loved to attend the services of the church and did so while health permitted. He regretted keenly not being able to join in the services during the latter period of his life because of his infirmities.
     He was a member of the G.A.R. and will be sorely missed among the few remaining members of that honored group. He was a loving and a patient and father and grandfather. His life was a noble example set before his children and all who knew him. He was ever cheerful. His presence carried with it strength, encouragement, enthusiasm, and courage---truly he was a benign influence among us.

Middleport newspaper
January 1929
Transcribed by Henny Evans


Gray, Wilders Bivens

IN MEMORY
     Wilders Bivens Gray was born in Columbiana County, Ohio, Nov. 10, 1836 and died: Dec. 8, 1922, aged 86 years and 28 days. His father died when he was quite young throwing many hardships and much responsibility upon him and the rest of his family to gain a livelihood. He continued those labors up until the last two or three years of his long and useful life. Many of the homes of the country surrounding Vinton are monuments testifying to his labor and efficient workmanship.
     He was an exceptionally kind and loving husband and father. Unlike many fathers, he succeeded in keeping his sons at home associated with him in business. He leaves to mourn their loss two sons and four daughters, all of whom cared for him in his last illness, also one sister, Nancy Hutchinson and twelve grandchildren. His wife died in 1916. Two sons and three daughters preceded him in death.
     He was married to Charlotte McCarley in 1859. To this union were born seven daughters and four sons. Those living are Elizabeth, at home, Nannie Glenn, Mahala Fisher, Ethel Quickle, William and Thomas.
     He associated himself with the Christian Church in 1898. He was very fond of young company, which made him seem young for one of his years. While he had been a sufferer for about one year, he never complained. He leaves a wide circle of friends, neighbors and relatives who join in mourning with the family.
     The funeral was held at the home Sunday afternoon conducted by Rev. W.J. Fulton, assisted by Rev. Bethel. Burial followed in McGhee Cemetery by the side of his departed wife.

Card of Thanks

     We desire to express our sincere thanks and appreciation to our neighbors and friends for their many acts of kindness during the illness and death of our dear father, W.B. Gray, also the ministers for their consoling words and the singers for the music furnished.
                     The Family

[Note: Death Certificate...Wilders Bevons Gray born Nov. 1, 1836 Ohio; died Dec. 8, 1922 Morgan Township, Gallia County, Ohio; aged 86 years, 28 days. He was a Carpenter and resident of Vinton. Parents: Wilders Gray and Elizabeth Peart. He married Anna Charlotte McCarley on Sept. 11, 1859. Squirrel Hunter.]

Gallia Times
Dec. 21, 1922
Transcribed by F.K. Brown                                                                            Top of Page


Grayum, Henry, Maj.

Death of Major Henry Grayum
     A good man has fallen. After an illness of some months duration, Major Henry Grayum died at his residence in Springfield township, early on Saturday morning last. His age was 58 years. He was buried at Mt. Zion, Sunday, by military honors, under command of Capt. J.W. Dale, one of his old comrades in the war. The Naomi Band kindly furnished the music. The attendance was large, Rev. W.J. Griffith preacing the funeral sermon.
     Major Grayum entered the army for the Union, as Captain, in June, 1861, in the 4th West Virginia Infantry Regiment. He served until late in 1864, when he was mustered out on account of the Regiment being reduced below a Major's command. He was wounded in the arm, which left it in a partially paralized [sic] state, in the siege of Vicksburg, May 19th, 1863. He died in the coat he had on when wounded. He was a brave, gallant soldier, loved and respected by all his army associates.
     Major Grayum was serving as County Surveyor at the time of his death. He was a man of great integrity of character, and performed all his duties, both as a citizen and officer, from a conscientious regard to right and justice. He died respected and lamented. His family, in their sore and sad bereavement, have the sympathy of all who knew him.

Gallipois paper found in scrapbook
June 1877
Transcribed by Henny Evans


Grayum, William

At his residence in the village of Cheshire, O., Friday, July 16, 1875, of obstruction of the bowels. Capt William Grayum, in the 55th year of his age.

[Note: from stone born 9/3/1820; buried Gravel Hill Cemetery, Cheshire twp. Served in the 4th regiment, West Virginia Infantry]          

Gallipolis Journal
July 22, 1875
Transcribed by Irene Blamer                                                                          Top of Page


Green, Alonzo Jewel

County's Oldest Lawyer, Civil War Vet, Dies
A.J. Green Passes After Long Period of Ill Health
Practiced at Last Court Term

     Death came early Friday morning to Attorney A.J. Green at his home on Island Side, following an illness of several weeks. Mr. Green became ill of a heart affection while visiting relatives in Parkersburg and suffered another attack upon his return home, since which time his recovery had not been expected.
     Mr. Green was veteran of the civil and is perhaps the last in this county of those who were confined in the Andersonville prison during the conflict betwen the north and the south. He celebrated his 84th birthday on Oct. 30 last, since he was stricken. Mr. Green had been active in his profession up to his late illness having a case during the last term of the Common Pleas Court in September.
     Funeral arrangements, which are in charge of A.E. Tope and further particulars will be given in Saturday's Tribune.

[Note: In other sources, (on his tombstone & on Cherrington family references) the name is spelled Greene.]


A.J. Green Funeral Sunday Afternoon
     Funeral services for A.J. Green will be conducted Sunday at 2 p.m. at his late home on upper First avenue, by Rev. J.V. Stone, pastor of the M.E. church. Burial in Pine street cemetery in charge of A.E. Tope.

[Note: He served in the 13th Indiana Battery and Co. A, 2nd West Virginia Volunteer Cavalry.]

Gallipolis Daily Tribune
November 15 and 16, 1929
Transcribed by Henny Evans


Green, Lemuel

     Lemuel Green of Blue Mound, Kansas, a former resident of this county, near Patriot, died March 18, 1893, of paralysis, at the age of sixty-six. In 1855 he was married to Miss Sarah Donnally, a sister of Mrs. Joseph Schenck, of the city. He is well remembered here as a good man and a devout Christian and was loved by all who knew him. He left a wife and three children to mourn their loss. They have the sympathy of many from here.

[Note: He served in Co. F, 141st Ohio Volunteer Infantry and he is buried in Pleasant View Cemetery, Blue Mound, Linn County, Kansas.]

Gallipois Journal
April 12, 1893
Transcribed by Henny Evans                                                                            Top of Page


Greene, William S.

Pioneer Gone
     Mr. William S. Greene, of Bladen, died last Friday in his 81st year, of chronic bronchitis, with which he had been ill for several weeks. He is survived by his wife and the following children: John H., Ira E., Harrison, Mrs. Charles Gilmore and Chas. M. Greene of the O. H. E. He was a member of the 78th O. V. I. during the civil war and a consistent member of Mt. Zion Baptist church. He was also a Mason and that order had charge of the funeral which was held Sunday afternoon at Bethel, burial by Wetherholt.

Gallipolis Bulletin
April 16, 1909
Transcribed by Margaret Calvin


Greenwood, Alexander

Death of Alex Greenwood

     Mrs. Johana Greenwood has just learned of the death of her husband, Alex Greenwood, the one-legged man. Mrs. Greenwood had just returned from a visit to her son Frank at Springfield, O., and says that Frank learned through the Patterson boys from Gallipolis, traveling with a circus, that Mr. Greenwood was taken to a State Hospital at Brighampton, N.Y., Feb. 2, 1893, [sic] and died at that institution. Frank wrote to the Superintendent of the Hospital and received full and exact confirmation of the news the Patterson Boys gave him, and he has no doubt of its authenicity. He came to the Hospital afflicted with general paralysis and never recovering, died as stated, and was given a soldiers burial.
     Mr. Greenwood left home 17 years ago with a New York Circus, after traveling quite awhile he left the circus and opened up a gun store at Waverly, N.Y., and lived there until taken to the Hospital. He had no reason for leaving home except to better his condition. While gone he deeded the property here to his wife, no doubt expecting to return sometime if he bettered his fortune. He was about 54 years old when he died. All our older citizens will remember when he lost his leg in the runaway. He was the father of Frank and Hattie Greenwood, and was well liked.

[Note: There is a tombstone for him in Pine Street Cemetery, 1841-1895 although the indication is that he was given a soldier's burial in New York. The date on the stone is June 10, 1895. The obituary states he went to the hospital in February 1893 almost two years before the obituary dated December 1895. He served in Co. F, 137th O.V.I.]

Gallipolis Daily Tribune
December 30, 1895
Transcribed by Henny Evans                                                                          Top of Page


Grimes, Edward H.

Mr. Edward H. Grimes, A Pioneer Citizen
     Mr. Edward H. Grimes, a pioneer citizen, aged 70 years, died at his home near Langsville, recently. He served three years in Company H, 36th Reg. O.V.I. He also had three sons in the war.

[Note: Born November 27, 1818, died January 17, 1889.]

Athens Messenger
January 31, 1889
Transcribed by Henny Evans


Grindley, George

     DIED - Suddenly on Saturday, December 23, 1922, at his residence, 44 Seaton place northwest. George, beloved husband of Mary Grindley. Funeral from his late residence on Wednesday, December 27, at 1 p.m.; thence to Arlington National cemetery. Relatives and friends invited to attend.

Washington Post
1922
Transcribed by Henny Evans

[Note: The following information was sent to us by T. Peter Lewis of Morriston, Swansea UK.]

     "George Grindley was born in 1841, Carmarthen St., Llandilo, in the county of Carmarthenshire, Wales. He emigrated to America with his parents, George and Elizabeth Ambrose Grindley, in 1852. Both of his parents died after arrival in the year 1852.
     George was 20 and a "Farmer's boy" in Raccoon Township, Gallia County, at the outset of the War. He volunteered for service in the Army of the United States and enrolled in the 56th Ohio Volunteer Infantry on October 15, 1861.
     Following his discharge George made his home in New Orleans and married Mary Miller, an immigrant from Ireland, in 1866. Ten children were born between December 1866 and December 1872, including two sets of twins.
     George was employed in various capacities in New Orleans including as a stenographer, working on his own account and a bookkeeper with U.S. Customs. He left New Orleans for Washington D.C. in the latter part of 1890 taking up a position as an Accountant in the Government Pensions Bureau.
     A brother, Henry, died in 1864 at age 19 whilst serving with the 27th Ohio Volunteer Infantry and is buried in Marietta National Cemetery, Georgia."                                                Top of Page


Gross, John C.

Death of Former Gallia County Resident
     J.C. Gross, aged 86, died in Michigan the first of the week. Three sons and one daughter survive. He was a resident of Rio Grande for over forty years and was well known here.

[Note: He has a Civil War Grave Registration Card and is buried in Calvary Cemetery in Raccoon Township.]

Gallipolis Daily Tribune
January 7, 1920
Transcribed by Henny Evans


Grover, John

     John D. Grover was born in Gloucester, Mass., June 17, 1825; died at his home near Cheshire, Ohio, February 4, 1897, aged 71 years, 5 months and 17 days. He served his country in the late war, being a member of Co. D, 141st Reg't, O. V. I., in which service he incurred injury which caused his death. He was a kind and loving father, a good and generous neighbor, and a true and affectionate husband, and leaves three sons, one daughter and a wide circle of friends to mourn their loss.
     Dear father, you have gone to the great unknown beyond, where all will have to go, and where we trust we will meet again some bright day, where parting will be no more. Although we expected death at any time yet how it did thrill our hearts with sorrow. Oh, how sad, how solemn, how sorrowful it is to see our near and dear friend taken from us and deposited in the cold and silent grave. Dear father, you have been snatched from us by the cold and cruel touch of death, and lie hidden from our tearful sight; but you will be held dear and sacred to our memory till the One who doeth all things well hath gathered us together in our eternal home. R. G.

[Note: stone Gravel Hill Cheshire Twp]

Gallipolis Bulletin
February 13, 1897 No. 15
Transcribed by Irene Blamer

     John Grover, aged 71, one of the substantial citizens of Cheshire Township, died of dropsy, Thursday of last week, and the remains were interred at the family burying ground on Saturday morning, the services being conducted by Rev. Fulton. Deceased was an old soldier having enlisted and served in the 141st O. V. I., and as a man was held in esteem by all who knew him, and who deeply regret his demise.

Gallipolis Bulletin
February 13, 1897
Transcribed by Irene Blamer                                                                          Top of Page


Grover, John W.

     John W. Grover died at his home at Porter on Wednesday, March 28, aged 71 years. The funeral services were conducted by Rev. Parkins at the Porter M. E. church, burial following by undertaker Butler of Vinton.  Mr. Grover was a fine old gentleman, a native of Gallia County and a Civil War veteran. He is survived by his widow, Mrs. Hannah Ward Grover, brothers Hiram A. Grover of Pine Grove, Joseph Grover of Vinton rfd, Isaac Grover of Bidwell rfd and Mason Grover of Bidwell.

[Note: from stone Clark Chapel, Morgan Twp August 30, 1842]

The Gallia Times Gallipolis, Ohio
April 11, 1917 Vol. XIX
Transcribed by Irene Blamer


Grube, August

     It is always a sad duty to record the death of a good man, but it is rendered doubly so when death comes so sudden, as is the case of August Grube, one of the most highly respected and honored citizens of Walnut township, who, without a moment's warning, was taken away while on a mission of mercy. Monday morning, February 25, 1895. Mr. Grube rose feeling as well as he had for a long time, ate his breakfast with the family and went about his work. As was his custom he went about a half mile to the farm he had recently purchased, where he was keeping some stock, to feed, and learning that his neighbor a short distance further on the way, Mr. Marshall Allbright, was sick, went to visit him. He left the home of Mr. Allbright about 10 o'clock, but not returning home within a reasonable time Mrs. Grube became uneasy and started some one in search of her husband, who found him where he had, from all appearances, fallen a short time after leaving Mr. Allbright's, dying instantly. Besides a widow, he leaves a large family of highly respected sons and daughters to mourn their loss.
     Three of his children, Mrs. Louise Steffens, August and Wm. F. Grube are in Missouri; one daughter, Mrs. Augusta Lehman, in Ogden, Utah; Henry E. of this city, and the others are Carl, Ernest, Robert and Mary at home. The absent ones have been telegraphed for and at this writing the time of the funeral cannot be fixed. Rev. Becker, of Pomeroy will conduct the services and Hayward & Son the burial. Deceased was a soldier in the rebellion having served in Company B of the 178 O. V. I.
     Later.--The funeral will take place today, Wednesday, at 10 o'clock a. m., the absent members of the family being unable to attend.

[Note: from stone German Ridge Walnut Twp. born December 13, 1837; Civil War Soldiers and Sailors web site lists him as Augustus Gruby in Co B 173rd O.V.I.]

Gallipolis Journal
February 27, 1895
Transcribed by Irene Blamer


Grube, August

     Another respected and beloved man has been called to his eternal rest. August Grube, of Walnut Township, died suddenly on Monday last, February 25, 1895, aged 56 years. On Monday morning, Mr. Grube arose in his usual health, and after breakfast started to visit his lower farm, as was his custom. From the farm, he went to call on a neighbor, Mr. Marshall Allbright, whose house he left at 10 o’clock to return home. Not reaching home for dinner, his wife became alarmed and sent her son Ernest in search of him. Ernest found his father lying in a fence corner, dead, about a quarter of a mile from his home. For years he had been a sufferer from heart trouble, and it was this dread disease that, without doubt, caused his death.
     Mr. Grube was a soldier in the 173d Ohio Infantry, a citizen of unblemished character, and his death is universally regretted. His wife and ten children survive, and have the sympathy of all in their bereavement.   
     Three of his children, August, Mrs. Louise Steffens and William, live in Missouri; Mrs. August Lehman, another daughter, resides at Ogden, Utah; Henry E. is a resident of Gallipolis, and five others, Carl, Ernest, Robert, Mary and Lena are at home.
     The funeral took place on Wednesday, Rev. R. Becker, of Pomeroy, officiating, and the burial by Hayward & Son, was at the church cemetery in Walnut Township.

The Gallipolis Bulletin
Saturday, March 2, 1895
Transcribed by Sandy L. Milliron                                                                     Top of Page


Grube, Henry

Aged Farmer Dies at Northup Home Thurs.
Henry A. Grube, Born in Germany, Veteran of Civil War
     Henry Andrew Grube, aged 85, one of the best known farmers of this county died at 2 p.m. Thursday at his home near Northup. He was born in Germany, coming to this country when about 14 years old and served during the Civil War with Co. C, 173rd reg. Ohio infantry, and is one of a few remaining veterans in the county.
     He is survived by his wife, Carolina, 5 daughters and 4 sons: Fred Grube, Kansas City, Mo.; Mrs. Frederica Hupman, Independence, Mo., Mrs. Dora Tope, Northup, John and Henry Grube, Groveport, O. Mrs. Emma Keister, Columbus, Louis Grube and Mrs. May Danner, this city and Miss Stella Grube at home, another daughter, Miss Christine, passed away only a few weeks ago.
     Rev. Pilch, of the Pomeroy Lutheran church will conduct the funeral services at 2 p.m. Sunday at Centenary church and burial in Mound Hill cemetery in charge of A.E. Tope.

[Note: He actually served in Co. B, 173rd OVI]

Gallipolis Daily Tribune
February 3, 1928
Transcribed by Henny Evans


Guard, Walter

     Walter Guard, Corporal, age 22, enlisted July 21st, 1861, from Gallipolis, killed at Snicker's Ferry, Virginia, July 18th, 1864—unmarried.

[Note: This was taken from a list of soldiers who died in the war. He served in Co. G, 4th West Virginia Infantry.]

Gallipolis Journal
September 21, 1865
Transcribed by Eva Swain Hughes


Gudgeon, Dixie

     Dixon Gudgeon, enlisted in Co. H, 56th O.V.I., died in prison in Louisiana, 10th of May, 1864—unmarried.

[Note: His name was found in a list of soldiers who died in the war. He was born about 1842. He was wounded and taken prisoner April 4, 1864 at Sabine Cross Roads, Louisiana. He is buried at Alexandria National cemetery in Alexandria, Louisiana.]

Gallipolis Journal
November 9, 1865
Transcribed by Henny Evans                                                                           Top of Page


Guinn, A. S.

     Mr. A. S. Guinn died at the at Bulaville, Monday morning, home of his son, John R. Guinn, July 19, 1909. He had been a teacher, mostly in West Virginia, for 30 years, but had not taught for the past nine years. He leaves a wife and nine grown children, all married but one. He was a good man and his death will be regretted by all who knew him. The funeral was held Wednesday afternoon.

[Note: stone Ahas Seilc Guinn, Mound Hill Cemetery; Co. B, 4th W.Va.I.; b. Jan. 29, 1842 d. July 19, 1909]

Gallipolis Bulletin
July 23, 1909 Vol. 39
Transcribed by Irene Blamer


Guinn, Richard W.

     Richard W. Guinn, Civil War veteran and a resident of El Dorado Community for 63 years died at the home of his son, Charles Guinn, 503 North Taylor street this morning at 9:30. He was 89 years old.
Mr. Guinn was one of the few surviving veterans of the Civil War still living in Butler County and his death ends a life filled with adventure. Because of his long residence in this community, he was known by hundreds of persons who mourn his passing.
     The El Doradoan, then a resident of Ohio, enlisted in the Seventh Ohio Volunteer Cavalry, Company L., in 1862 and served through the entire war. He also served as a scout and as a spy and had numerous interesting experiences to relate. Although not generally known, Mr. Guinn was a member of the party which captured Jefferson Davis, president of the Confederacy on May 10, 1865, near Irwinsville, Ga.
     Mr. Guinn once related the story of Davis capture in the following manner: "Several times we saw Jeff Davis, but every time he was surrounded by a body of Confederates and it was not safe to try to capture him. One day, however, the major of the Ninth Michigan infantry, who was in charge of our detachment, got a tip that Davis had received word that his wife and children were in peril and he had gone to join them near Irwinsville, Ga.
     We hurried to Irwinsville, where we camped near a spring and near another camp. There we waited until morning, sleeping on the blue grass sod, hoping to get track of Davis at daybreak. We did not know for sure that the camp near where we slept was the Davis camp. While we were dressed as Confederates we kept up the semblance of military order.
     When day was breaking, we were roused by our watch who reported that an old woman was coming towards us. Since she was coming from the direction of the camp we thought it would be wise to stop her and make inquiries. A man was with her. The man told us that the old grandmother simply wished to go to the spring to get a drink.
     At that time a Tennessee boy, who had been lying on the grass and who had not risen with the rest of us, spied spurs sticking out under the skirts. The old grandmother is wearing boots and spurs? He exclaimed. Of course we were sure than that something was wrong and we arrested the woman pulled the headdress off and found it was none other than the president of the Confederacy. We hurriedly turned him over to federal troops in that vicinity and then returned to our own command.
     Davis, his wife and members of his cabinet who were present at the time of the capture, deny that he was wearing petticoats but Mr. Guinn always maintained that he was dressed as a woman. For his part in the capture, the El Doradoan received a letter of commendation and $100 in cash from the War Department. Each man participating in the capture was supposed to have received $300 but Mr. Guinn believed that the reason he never received the full amount is because he came to Kansas soon after.
     Mr. Guinn was born on June 1, 1843, near Gallipolis, Ohio, and came to Butler County settling on a claim near Towanda, in 1870. He resided there for several years and then removed to a farm north of El Dorado where he had maintained his residence since. He had resided here with his son, however, for the past 32 years. Mr. Guinn had been in poor health for two years.
     He was married to Miss Katheryn Siders, in Ohio, on September 28, 1868, but she died on September 20, 1898. Mr. Guinn was a member of Patmos Lodge No. 97, A. F. & A. M. here.
     Surviving are three sons, Charles, of El Dorado, George R., of Wichita, and Dr. Edward Guinn of Antlers, Okla. Four other children are deceased, two boys dying in infancy.
     Funeral arrangements will be announced through the Byrd Funeral Home. Among out of town relatives who were here to attend funeral services this afternoon for R. W. Guinn, Butler County Pioneer and Civil War veteran, were Dr. and Mrs. Edward Guinn and their granddaughter, Edwardene of Antlers, Okla., Mr. and Mrs. Cloyd Guinn of St. Louis, Mo., Mr. and Mrs. Corwin Guinn of Wichita and Miss Adjesta, a student at the University of Wisconsin, at Madison. Dr. Guinn is a son of the deceased Mr. Guinn and Cloyd, Corwin and Miss Adjesta are grandchildren.
     Mr. and Mrs. Chas. Guinn will leave tomorrow morning to drive to Bidwell, Ohio were interment will be made.

[Note: He was buried in Pine Hill Cemetery in Springfield Township.]

El Dorado Times
March 30, 1933
Transcribed by Henny Evans                                                                          Top of Page

     Funeral services for Richard W. Guinn, Civil War Veteran who died at his home, 503 North Taylor Street, Thursday, were held at the Byrd Funeral Home Saturday afternoon with Rev. R. m. Truesdale, pastor of the Presbyterian Church, officiating. A large crowd of friends and relatives of the well known El Doradoan were in attendance to pay their last respects while an abundance of floral offerings testified as to the friendship in which he was held. A trio, composed of C. M. McCaughan, C. W. Harvey and Tom Kington, sang "Tenting Tonight" and "The Vacant Chair" while Mr. Kington sang a solo, "Requiem." They were accompanied by Miss Thelma Atkinson.
     The casket was draped with an American flag while other flags were placed at the head and foot by the Women's Relief Corps here, who attended the services in a body. The casket was also banked with flowers.
The body was taken to Bidwell, Ohio, yesterday where funeral services and interment will probably be held tomorrow afternoon.


Guthrie, Charles

An Old Cheshire Boy, Dies in Dodge City, Kansas
     C. A. Guthrie, a brother of Milo Guthrie of Cheshire and of A. D. Guthrie of the B. I. S. at Lancaster, died January 15 at his home in Dodge City, Kansas.
     The following sketch of his life is taken from the Globe-Republican published at Dodge City:
For 44 years he remained in the town of his birth. On April 15th 1863, his 23rd birthday, he was united in marriage to Miss Sarah Lindsey, of Gallia County, Ohio. After their wedding this happy young couple settled down to housekeeping in their native county in Ohio where they lived for 21 years, when they made their first move in the fall of 1884, coming to Augusta, Butler County, Kansas, where they remained about one year. In the fall of 1885 they with their family, came to Hodgeman county where they erected their new home on government land. Here they learned to endure the hardships of pioneer life.
     In spring of 1900, this worthy couple, now growing old, moved to Dodge City, where they have made their home until God took the husband to the home above.
     Two sons and two daughter[s] were born to them. One daughter, Almira, died at the age of five years. The others, Augustus Lindsey Guthrie, of Dodge City, Charles Homer Guthrie, of Jetmore, and Mrs. Laura Sheldon, of Spearville, remain to join their mother in mourning the departure of a kind father and devoted husband.
     The subject of this sketch was cenverted at the age of 22 years and joined the Methodist Episcopal church. To him church membership meant more than a mere form. He was always an active worker in the church of his choice. He held official positions in the church and Sunday School nearly all his life. While a thorough Methodist and loyal to his church, he was broad in his sympathies and was always ready to help in every good cause. For several years he had been an officer in the County Sunday School Association.
     His early life was spent in mercantile pursuits in association with his father. He was never a very rugged man and for several years past had been in poo[r] health. On the first of October last he was stricken with his last sickness. During these months, in spite of medical skill, he had slowly grown weaker and much of the time his sufferings were intense. All that loving hands and medical attention could do was lavished upon the sufferer, but on Saturday, January 5th 1910, at 5:30 P. M. the weary form was at rest and the spirit of this man of prayer went to God who gave it. He had lived on the earth 69 days and 9 months.
     During the Civil War he served a brief term toward its close. He joined company D, 141st Ohio National Guards, May 2, 1864. He was mustered out of service September 3rd of the same year.

Gallipolis Journal
February 9, 1910
Transcribed by Romaine Smith


Guthrie, Franklin Augustus

The Remains of Frank A. Gutherie Buried at Kanawah [sic-Kanauga]
     Mr. Franklin Augustus Guthrie, whose death was briefly mentioned Monday, was the son of Augustus S. and Cyntha A. Guthrie, fine old people remembered by elderly people, and was born in Addison twp. January 23rd, 1838. He always lived on a farm and was well known over the county. He was married to Miss Sarah J. Smith, of Pt. Pleasant, May 26, and they became the parents of three children, Mrs. Floyd Kellar, of Fayetteville, W. Va., A. S. Guthrie, of Charleston and L. J. Guthrie, who lives on the old home farm above Kanauga. He was the last of his father’s family and a good enterprising citizen, well liked and respected. His brother James died in June 1612 [sic-should be 1912].
     Mr. Floyd Kellar, his brother-in-law, is here but his wife was unable to come. His sons are here and the funeral services were this afternoon, conducted by Rev. Mr. Lightner, of the Cheshire Methodist Church, of which Mr. Guthrie was a member, the interment following at the Guthrie Family cemetery above Kanauga by Wetherholt. Frank was one of the old Academy boys and was a highly intelligent man, kind hearted, sympathetic, generous and upright.

[Note: He served as a Squirrel Hunter.]

Gallipolis Daily Tribune
December 16, 1913
Transcribed by J. Farley


Guthrie, James Madison

James Madison Guthrie
     Died at Cheshire, Ohio, July 2, 1875, James Madison Guthrie, of cancer of the stomach.

[Note: Company D, 141st. Ohio Voluntary Infantry]

Gallipolis Journal
Thursday, July 18, 1875 (Vol XL no. 35)
Transcribed by F.K. Brown                                                                            Top of Page


Guthrie, Wesley B.

Death of Dr. W. B. Guthrie
     After a long illness Dr. W. B. Guthries (Guthrie) died at his residence on Second Street at 3 o'clock on Thursday morning, June 20, 1889. Although he had been dangerously sick for a year past, his death was a surprise to most of our citizens. It was but a few days since we shook hands with the Doctor upon the street and congratulated him upon his being able to walk about. He replied that he felt somewhat stronger, but said he knew he was "liable to go at any time."
     The funeral was held on Friday afternoon at the M. E. Church, the services being conducted by Rev. Messrs. Evans and Arbuckle and Ariel Lodge, No. 156, I. O. O. F., and the burial at Mound Hill under the direction of Messrs. Hayward & Son.
     Mr. Evans gave an interesting memoir of the deceased, which we would, had we the space, be glad to publish in full, but can only make a few condensed extracts from it.
"Wesley B. Guthrie, son of Rev. Francis and Elizabeth Guthrie, was born in Ellsworth, Trumbull County, Ohio, April 18, 1835. He was the ninth child of a family of thirteen children. A few years ago the doctor was prevailed upon to write a brief sketch of his life for the use of his family, and now that he has taken his departure for the heavenly country, whence he will not return, we take pleasure in presenting interesting points in his career.
    "He says in his sketch 'after a somewhat checkered boyhood I went into business, as a clerk, in Harrisonville, Va., at the age of sixteen, and attended a select school as I had opportunity.' He attended other schools and also taught until 1856, when he took a course and graduated at Duff's College, Pittsburg. In 1857-8 he attended the Athens University, and in 1860 he received licenses to exhort and preach. In the latter part of the same year he was received into the Ohio Conference at Gallipolis. He filled several appointments until August 1862, when he volunteered his services for the Union. He was made a 1st Lieutenant in the 81st O. V. I., and served until the end of the war. He participated in six battles and fifty-six skirmishes, and held the positions of Lieutenant, Quartermaster, Captain, and Judge Advocate.
     After the war he returned to his father, who was then stationed at Ewington, in this county. He commenced the study of medicine and graduated from the Ohio Medical College in 1872. In
1869 he married Miss Selina M. Brown, daughter of Major Brown, of Mason County, W. Va. In 1874 he located in this city where he has since resided. Dr. Guthrie was elected a member of the City Council in 1877 and served four years."
     In closing his remarks Mr. Evans said: "Dr. Guthrie has been an acceptable member of the Methodist Church for many years. He was a man of strong attachment--loved his church and loved his family. If he had no faults he differed from those who survive him in that particular. He will be greatly missed from society and the church, but no where so much as in the loving home where his widow and five fatherless children mourn their loss. The last year of the life of Dr. Guthrie was one of suffering--of ten of intense suffering, but in the midst of it all he was in perfect harmony with God, and, at times, exulted in hope of freedom from earthly confinements and rest in heaven. The burden of his song continually was: "This world is not my home."

Gallipolis Bulletin
June 25, 1889
Transcribed by Karen Strojin                                                                         Top of Page


Guyn, Thomas C.

Thomas C. Guyn In Memory
     Thomas C. Guyn, a veteran of the Civil War, and son of Robert and Mary Guyn was born at Porter, Ohio, August 21, 1840, and died May 24, 1922, aged 81 years, 9 months, and 3 days.
     He was united in marriage with Elizabeth Rife on October 21, 1863, and to this union one son, James L., was born, who with his mother preceded him to their heavenly home.
     Mr. Guyn is survived by three grandchildren, Mrs. Omar Rife and Mrs. Blanche Mink, of Bulaville, and Thomas G. Guyn of Wapato, Washington, and two great grandsons, Estel Mink and Thomas Jack Guyn.  He is also survived by two brothers amd four sisters.
     Since the death of his son he has been tenderly cared for by his granddaughters, Mrs. Rife and Mrs. Mink.  He will be sadly missed in their homes and by his neighbors and many friends.  We trust what is our loss will be his eternal gain. There was no sacrifice too great for him to make for those who cried for him so kindly. We would have kept him longer, but the death angel touched him and he slept.  His many acts of kindness all through life will be a solace and comfort to those left behind. As we looked on his peaceful face these words came to our mind, "Blessed are the dead that die in the Lord."  He united with the Bulaville Church, February 19, 1893, and was always at church services when health would permit.
     The funeral services were held at Bulaville Church Sunday at 10 A. M. by Rev. Ewing, interment in the Rife Cemetery by H. K. Butler.

Sad and sudden was the call,
Of him so dearly loved by all.
His memory still is ever dear,
The flowers we laid upon his grave
May whither and decay.
But fresh with love within our hearts,
His memory will ever stay.

Card of thanks - We desire to extend our hearthfelt thanks to our friends and neighbors for their kindly help and sympathy in our time of need.  The family.

Gallia Times
Volume XXIV
Number 25
June 22, 1922
Gallipolis, Ohio
Transcribed by Michael L. Trowbridge

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