Genealogical Resources Page    Gallia County Newspaper Obituaries
Civil War Families Page                              for Civil War Veterans

M - Q

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Macomber, Jonas Purdee

     Jonas was raised by Linza and Calphurnia Macomber but was he was born a Purdee January 13, 1840. He
married Sarah McMillin in 1859. He enlisted in Co.K, 60th Ohio Volunteer Infantry and was one of those who surrendered to Stonewall Jackson. He was paroled to Richmond and then to Chicago. After his discharge he enlisted again in Co. G, 195th Ohio Volunteer Infantry.
     After the war he worked as a sawyer. Sarah died in 1901 and he married again to Celestine Norton Spires.
He died in 1928 and is buried at Old Holcomb Cemetery in Huntington Township.

Created obit from research of Nancy Hank Ewing and war records
1928
Created by Henny Evans


Maddy, John Cook
     Rev. John C. Maddy was born in Monroe co., W.Va., Feb. 5, 1822, and died in Kokomo, Ind., Dec, 12, 1885, aged 63. He was the son of Jacob and Nancy Maddy. His boyhood and youth were passed on various farms in West Virginia, and most of the time he was engaged in hard labor. His educational advantages were very meager. Up to his twelfth year he attended such schools as the neighborhood and the times afforded. From 12 to 21 hard manual labor forbade any schooling, and after 21 sixteen days' attendance was all that he was able to obtain.
     In Nov., 1843, he came to Gallia co.,O., and soon afterward his father's family followed him. Here he became the mainstay of the family. He located forty acres of land, which he cleared and cultivated, on which he placed his parents, and where they lived until their death. After his arrival in Ohio Brother Maddy became very anxious for a better education. Unable to go to school, he resolved to do the next best thing, and to study and read by himself. Wherever he could obtain the loan of a book, he hastened to avail himself of it. His evenings, after a day's labor, were devoted to reading, and every spare moment found him with a book in hand. He laid out before himself the whole curriculum of the Ohio Wesleyan University at that time, and read and studied it privately, until in time he had gone through with the whole of it. In this way he became especially proficient in Greek and philosophy. In 1843 he taught his first Winter's school, and for the next seven years he taught each year more or less.
   He was converted at a camp-meeting in Monroe co., W.Va., Aug. 30, 1842. He at once united with the Church. In 1843 he had a very severe attack of lung fever, during which he was given up to die. In the sickness he promised God that if he should be spared, he would go forth and try to warn sinners to flee the wrath to come. He was licensed to exhort in 1846. Three years later he was licensed to preach. A vacancy occurring on the Ironton Circuit, he was sent out as junior preacher two weeks before he was licensed to preach. In 1850 he was admitted on trial in the Ohio Conference. In due time he was admitted in full connection, and ordained deacon and elder. On the division of the conference, he fell into the Cincinnati Conference, of which he remained a member until his death. The following is the list of his appointments: Wheelersburg, Madisonville, Goshen, Amelia, Harrison, Miami, Laurel, Manchester, Moscow, Amelia, Mt. Washington, Centenary,Walnut Hills, Amelia. While at Amelia for the third time, in 1870, his health failed in the middle of the year. He was obliged to take a superannuated relation, and in that most honorable station he remained, testifying to the grace of God to sustain in the midst of the greatest prostration of body, until the day of his release. In his active ministry he preached 2,300 times, and received nearly a thousand into the Church.
     Brother Maddy was married to Miss Hannah S. Langdon, while on the Madisonville Circuit, in 1852. She has been to him a most faithful wife. Eight children were given to them, of whom two in early childhood were translated to the many mansions. Six have grown up to manhood and womanhood. For 15 years he was the victim of disease. In 1874 he removed to Rushville, Ind., where he purchased a little farm, on which he remained four years. Three years ago he sold this place, and purchased another farm at Kokomo, Ind. About six months after his removal to Kokomo, he was again prostrated and never rallied again to be out among his brethern or in the church. Immediately before his death he was better than usual. He was taken worse at noon of the day before his death, and continued to sink until death relieved him from his sufferings. On that day he was in the full possession of his consciousness until midnight, giving all his directions and final counsels to his wife and children. At midnight he became unconscious, and at 5 in the morning the light of the eternal day dawned upon him, and he was at home in his Father's house. His funeral took place from his residence, on the morning of December 15th, and was conducted by his intimate friend and former pastor, the Rev. Reuben Andrus, D.D., assisted by the Rev. J. E. Erivn, presiding elder of the Kokomo District, and by his pastor.
     As a man he was also transparent, ingenious and honest. He was the soul of honor in all his relations, and especially in pecuniary manners. He never feigned to have any characteristics which he did not possess. Toward others he was confiding, truthful, and unsuspecting. He was public spirited, and all his powers were ever fully thrown on the side of every great and good reform. His reputation as well as his character was ever above reproach, and not the faintest shadow of aspersion was ever cast on his fair fame [sic]. As a superannuate he was cheerful and sweet-spirited. He never repined, but was hopeful and pleasant. He was a valued helper to his pastor. There was nothing about him that caused his pastor to dread him, but on the contrary, his pastors looked upon him as a brother beloved and a wise counselor. In his home, as a family man, he was affectionate, kind, and full of love, yet always ruled his own household well. He was anxious for the education of his children, and did all in his power to aid them. His influence and faithfulness, even in his sickness, are well shown by the fact that all of his children have developed into a Christian maturity, and not one of them has ever done or said aught unworthy of the character or standing of their father. The love between him and his wife was such that it was a pleasure to care for him,and their affection(s) were remarkably developed by a third of a century of trial and suffering. C.G. Hudson

[Note: He served in Co. H, 138th OVI.]

Paper unknown
Probably 1885
Transcribed by Henny Evans


Maguet, John

Death of Mr. John Maguet
     Mr. A.C. Safford received a telegram stating the death of Mr. John Maguet at Washburn,Ind., Friday, July 25, 1924. Mr. Maguet was a Civil War veteran and had spent most of his life in Gallipolis, moving away only a few years ago.
     He leaves his widow Mrs. Margaret Jones Maguet. His remains will arrive Monday with funeral services Tuesday, burial following at Mound Hill by W.N. Hayward.

Funeral of John Maguet
     The funeral of Jno. Maguet will be held at the residence of A.C. Safford on Tuesday at 10:30 a.m.
Remains will arrive here on the Hocking Valley.Rev. Glenn of the Presbyterian church will conduct the service. Burial by Hayward on Mound Hill cemetery.

[Note: He served in Co. F, 2nd Ohio Heavy Artillery and enlisted at the age of 13 or 14 as a Drummer.]

Gallipolis Daily Tribune
July 26 and 28, 1924
Transcribed by Henny Evans


Mahan, John Nelson

Civil War Veteran
     John Nelson Mahan, a civil war veteran, died at his home in Walnut township on Jan. 1, 1928. The funeral was Tuesday at Fairview church by Rev. Frye.
     Mr. Mahan was born in West Virginia 87 years ago, but he had lived in Ohio nearly all his life. He leaves six children, Melvin E. Mahan of Waterloo, Ezra P. Mahan and Mrs. Nora B. Edler of Springfield, Enoch L. Mahan, Mrs. Esta E. Myers and Mrs. Cora A. Myers, all of Patriot. His wife, Mrs. Nancy Sutton Mahan, preceded him in death two years ago at almost the same hour. He was a member of Fairview Christian church. He is survived by 29 grandchildren and 17 great-grandchildren.

[Note: He served in Co. B, 1st West Virginia Artillery. He is buried in Fox-Fairview Cemetery.]

Gallia Times
January 12, 1928
Transcribed by Henny Evans


Mahan, Joseph Stewart

Old Soldier Dead
    Joseph Stewart Mahan, an old soldier died Sunday at Northup at the home of his daughter. He was 78 years old, his wife preceding him several years ago. The funeral was conducted Tuesday morning at 11 o'clock by the Rev. Mr. Morrow at Centenary. Mr. Mahan was a well known man and had many friends who will hear of his death with regret. Wetherhold has charge of the remains.

[Note: Centenary Cemetery - Tombstone reads B.1825 - D.1916 - Unit CD B 173rd OVI]

Gallipolis Bulletin
March 2, 1916
Transcribed by Maxine Marshall


Malloon, Lewis Franklin

     Died, at his residence in Green township, Gallia county, O., Nov. 18, 1863, of disease of the lungs, Lewis Franklin Malloon, aged 22 years. He was a private in Capt. E. S. Aleshire's Company, 2nd O. V. H. A., but discharged a few days prior to his death.

The Gallipolis Journal
December 17, 1863
Transcribed by Eva Swain Hughes


Malloon, Mark

     Died, at his residence in Green township, Gallia county, O., Dec. 5, 1863, Mark Malloon, aged 55 years. His death resulted from camp fever, contracted at Covington, Ky., whilst attending on his son Lewis Malloon. Thus father and son have fallen victims to this unhallowed rebellion.

The Gallipolis Journal
December 17, 1863
Transcribed by Eva Swain Hughes


Maloon, Samuel

     DIED - At Andersonville Georgia, July 9th, of Chronic Diarrhea. Samuel B. Melloon in the 20th year of his age. In Sept., 1862, he felt it his duty to go at his country's call, and enlisted under Capt. Leaper, in the 7th Ohio Cavalry in which he served faithfully until taken prisoner, which was in Nov. 1863. Although being confined in prison for near 9 months, he bore it very patiently, and seldom complained of his hardships and privations, we trust he has

Gone to the land where spirits rest,
Gone to the home of Angels blest,
We mourn his loss, we linger on,
Waiting to go where we trust he has gone
He wonders now by that peaceful river,
In that cloudless clime where we'll live forever.
              By a friend.

[Note: Co. L, 7th OVC; D. 7/10/1864]

Gallipolis Journal
April 6, 1865                                                                                               Top of Page


Manring, George W.

     Second Lieutenant George W. Manring was killed in the Battle of Champion's Hill on May 16, 1863. His death was reported to his father in a letter home written by Capt. Maschil Manring, also in Co. A, 56th O.V.I.
George was the son of Jordan and Sarah Knox Manring and was born in Gallia County. He never married but enlisted in the Civil War. He is buried in the Vicksburg National Park in Mississippi.

[Note: The information came from a transcription of the letter written home by Capt. Maschil Manring. A transcription was passed down by family members and the entire article can be seen on this website under Civil War history. Submitted by Henny Evans.]


Manring, John Jordan

Drummer Boy Dead
     After an extended illness from Bright's Disease and heart trouble, John Jordan Manring, died early Tuesday morning at his home in West Wellston. His condition had been serious since December.
     Mr. Manring was born near Vinton in Gallia county, 73 years ago. After the death of his mother, he went to Centerville to make his home with his brother and a short time later ran away from there, when only a lad of 14 and enlisted as a drummer boy in the struggle between the north and south. Later he was transferred to Co. D, 179th O.V.I. He was first married to Mary Nichols, who died 18 years ago and three years later he married Sarah Hammon, who with his two daughters, Mrs. W.E. Braley of this city, and Marie, survives him. He also has one brother, William Manring of Richland Furnace.
     Mr. Manring had been a resident of Wellston for eighteen years and until five years ago was in the grocery business with his son-in-law, W.E. Braley. He is a member of the local G.A.R. and was the drummer of the Drum Corps. The funeral will be held Thursday afternoon at the home and interment will be in Ridgewood cemetery. The Masonic lodge, of which he was a member, will have charge of the services. Wellston Telegram

Gallia Times
April 14, 1921
Transcribed by Henny Evans

J.J. Manring, Old Soldier, Dies at Wellston
     John J. Manring, 73, a former resident of Centerville, is dead at Wellston of Bright's disease. He was born at Vinton and was a drummer boy in the Union army at 14. Later he was transferred to Co. D 179th O.V.I. The Masons had charge of the funeral services.

Gallipolis Daily Tribune
April 9, 1921
Transcribed by Henny Evans                                                                           Top of Page


Manring, Maschil/Masquil

     Manring, Maschil...died 22 Feb. 1905, of pneumonia, of McFall, Mo.. His parents, Jordan and Sarah (Knox)
Manring moved to Gallia Co., Ohio shortly after their marriage. His father served in the war of 1812.
Maschil was born in Gallia Co., Ohio, 5 Sept. 1823 & was the 11th child in a family of 10 boys & 9 girls
& all lived to manhood & Womanhood__Andrew J.; Minerva; Elisha; John; Permelia; Ruana; Elizabeth; William;
Holden; Sarah; Jordan: Alden; Maschil; Mary Ann; Ahira; Aurila; Eliza; Alvin; Rebecca; George & Ruth Manring.
     Maschil taught school in Ohio for some years. He married Ann Love, of Gallia Co., Ohio 11 April 1850.
Nine children were born, 7 boys & 2 girls__Lauren; Margaret; Ellener; Elavins; Oakley; Edward D.; Maschil;
William Sherman; John Franklin & Eva. Only 4 sons remain.
     Maschil, Sr. was engaged in the manufacture of Iron & was keeper & had full control of the Keystone
furnaces. Gallia furnace, Logan furnace, Lawrence, Center furnaces at different time(s) until the war.
     He enlisted in Co. A, 56th Ohio Inf. & was mustered into the army at Portsmouth, Ohio as a Capt. of his
Co. with brother George as a Lt.. George died at Champion Hill, 16 May 1863.
After the war, they moved to Gentry Co., Mo. in April of 1865.

[Note: He is buried in Fairview Cemetery, McFall, Gentry County, Missouri.]

Gentry County Missouri Death Notices
February 1905
Transcribed by Henny Evans


Manring, Warren William

     Warren was born April 9, 1842 to Andrew Jefferson and Sarah Ewing Manring in Huntington Township, Gallia County and was actually known as William all of his life. He enlisted in 1861 in his uncle's company, Capt. Masquil Manring of Co.A, 56th Ohio Volunteer Infantry. He came down with measles soon after enlisting and spent time in both Routh Hospital in Cincinnati and Overton Hospital in Memphis. He was discharged in 1864 but reenlisted as a veteran at once and served until May 1866.
     William had two wives but the first's name is unknown. He married second to Sarah C. Bolar in Vinton
County. He had three children, Charles, Margaret and Warren, Jr. He and Sarah settled in Jackson County where he worked as a watchman for the B & O Railroad. He found it difficult to work as a result of general disability from the war. He died February 10, 1922 in Jackson County.

[Note: buried in Byer Cemetery, Washington Twp., Jackson Co., OH]

Created obit from Ewing family research of Nancy Hank Ewing and war records
February 1922
Created by Henny Evans


Markin, Squire Jefferson Taylor

Taps Sound For Squire Markin
Old Soldier and Well-known Citizen
     Squire Jefferson Taylor Markin of Eureka died at 9:15 Saturday night after a two weeks illness. A week before he had been successfully operated on for a ruptured bowel, and for several days thereafter his condition seemed to improve satisfactorily. News of his critical illness and later of his death caused general sorrow, because he was well known throuout the county and was respected and highly esteemed.
     Mr. Markin was born July 18, 1847, at Lincoln, this county, and was 68 years, 9 months and 11 days old. Converted at old Salem church (now Lincoln), he united with the M. E. Church early in life and was still actively engaged in Christian work when called from labor to reward. He was a Union soldier, serving from Feb. 27, 1864, to July 26, 1865, in the 23rd O.V.I.
     On Aug. 31, 1870, he married to Isabelle Boggs, who survives. He is also survived by five children, Wheeler M., Eureka; Chas C., Newark; Mrs. John P. Lasalle, Kimberly, Idaho; J. Q., Cleveland; Mrs. W. H. Burton, Frederick, Oklahoma. Mirandus S. Markin, an account of whose wife's death was in last week's Journal, was a brother of Squire Markin, and Mrs. Wheeler Brothers of Clay Tp. and Mrs. John Crouse of Harrison Tp. were sisters.
     The funeral services were held at Clay Chapel at 10 o'clock Tuesday, Rev. J. W. McConnell officiating. Burial at same place by Wetherholt. E. J. Riggs, Wm. Lewis, Charles Craft, Wm. Shaw, Curtis Allmon and W. E. Gilmore were the pallbearers.

Gallipolis Journal
Thursday May 4, 1916
Transcribed by Maxine Marshall


Markin, W. H.

Death of a Veteran
     Death has claimed another veteran. Afrter a long and honorable life, W. H. Markin, of Lincoln, has joined those who have preceded him. He died Monday morning, after a two weeks' sickness from general debility.
He was eighy-two years of age and leaves five children, viz:, Mrs. Susan Brothers, Mrs. Elizabeth Harbour, Mrs. Sarah Kraus, Taylor and Maranda Markins. After devine exercises at Dickey church conducted by Rev. Rice Tuesday, burial followed in the church burial grounds. Deceased was a member of the United Bretheren church and a good man.

[Tombstone reads B.Dec 17, 1816 - D.June 20, 1898 - Unit Co I 18th OVI]

Gallipolis Journal
Tues June 28, 1898
Transcribed by Maxine Marshall                                                                      Top of Page


Marshall, Samuel

Samuel Marshall Dead
     Samuel Marshall, a highly respected citizen of Chambersburg, passed away Saturday morning, February 7, 1914. He was in his eighty-fourth year and had been ill but a short time. The funeral services were conducted under the auspices of the Masonic lodge at Clay Chapel Sunday morning, the burial being in the church cemetery by Undertaker Wetherholt. Mr. Marshall is survived by his wife and one daughter, Mrs. Canada. He was an honest, likable man and his death will be regretted by all who knew him.

[Tombstone has B. Jul 13, 1832 - Unit Sq Hunter]

Gallipolis Bulletin
Feb 12, 1914
Transcribed by Maxine Marshall


Martin, Alpheus

Gallia County's Youngest Soldier Has Been Dead Half A Century
     Almost 54 years ago, on Oct. 23, 1862, a little Gallia County lad heard the call to arms through the rattling drum and shrilling fife and, boy-like, he ran away to the war. He served 27 months under the Stars and Stripes, and at the age of 16 years, a boy yet in years, he was stricken with typhoid and brot home to his mother to die.
     For almost 51 years he has been sleeping in the Robinson graveyard in Morgan Township, this county, awaiting the bugle call which will at last close up the gaps in the ranks of the soldier dead, no matter where they're sleeping, for the Grand Review.   (Photograph)
     Alpheus Martin, son of Mrs. Ann Eliza (Robinson) Martin of Morgan Township enlisted in the Union army at the age of 13 years and 9 months. He ran away from home and made his way to Charleston, W. Va., where he enlisted in a company then being raised by Capt. Ankrone, which later became attached to one of the West Virginia regiments.
     Young Martin was a bright, trim youngster and attracted the attention of Gen. Powell, who detailed him as an orderly to his staff. Our youthful Gallia County soldier saw service in the Shenandoah Valley and was engaged in the Lynchburg and Richmond campaigns.
     Unscathed by mimié ball or grapeshot, young Martin fell a victim to typhoid and was invalided home. He was unable to withstand the ravages of the disease, and on January 23, 1865, just one day after he had passed his 16th birthday the Death Angel mustered him out.
     The original of the picture accompanying this article, showing Alpheus Martin in the well remembered blue uniform and trim cap of the 60's, is an invaluable possession of his brother, Charles Martin of Bidwell, who himself was the first enlisted soldier from Gallia County in the War of the Rebellion. Charley was at the front at the time his brother ran away to enlist, and it was doubtless in emulation of his older brother's example, that young Alpheus determined to don the blue and follow the flag.
     Some day, doubtless a monument will be erected in commemoration of the brave boys who went forth from Gallia County in answer to their country's call, and what more fitting symbolic figure could be had than that of young Alpheus Martin, who enlisted at the age of 13 years and 9 months. All honor to his memory.

The Gallia Times
Wednesday, July 5, 1916
Transcribed by Margaret Calvin

[Subsequently the original obituary was found and is presented below.]The Gallipolis Journal
March 16, 1865

Martin, Alpheus T.

     Alpheus T. Martin, son of Alpheus Martin, deceased, and Ann E. Martin, died at his Mother's residence, in Morgan township, Gallia county, Ohio, on the 23d of Jan., 1865, of Typhoid Pneumonia. Although but a youth, he was anxious to serve his country, and in Sept., 1863, at the tender age of 15 years his zeal and patriotism getting the better of his judgment, he volunteered in Co. F, 2d R.W.Va., Cav., where he faithfully and satisfactorily performed his duties until his undeveloped frame, gave way under the exposure of the service. He was taken sick at Winchester, W.Va., after the very hard Cavalry expedition to Gordonsville, and through the kindness of Dr. Gardner, Surg., 1st Va. Cavalry, he was brought home where he died. One of the officers of his Reg't. informed his bereaved relations and friends, that he was a good boy and much liked in his Reg't., that he neither drank whisky [sic], gambled or used any profane language. He was the youngest and only Son at home at the time of volunteering, his older and only brother entered the service at the commencement of the war, and is now, a Veteran in the 56th Reg't. O.V.I. He was a sharer in the hardships and success of the Lynchburg raid, was a sharer in Gen. Sheridan's hard marches and grand victories in the Shenandoah Valley, and could he have lived, would have been a blessing to his Mother, and made an intelligent and useful citizen. His young heart beat high for the battlefield, that he might aid in the triumph of law, liberty, truth, justice, Union and Constitution, and the crushing of armed, organized treason. He did his duty, more than his duty, has given his young life to his Country, and others must enjoy the blessings his valor was aiding in preserving. At the time of his death he was 16 years, 5 months, and 24 days old.


Martin, Anthony

Mr. Martin Dead
     Mr. Anthony Martin, of Crown City, an old soldier of the Civil War, aged 86 years, died Wednesday, May 13th, 1908. He was taken to Huntington Friday for burial by a daughter who lives there.

[Note: - Not Buried in Gallia County, Ohio]

Gallipolis Bulletin
May 22, 1908
Transcribed by Margaret Calvin                                                                       Top of Page


Martin, Benj

Obituary
     Died at his home in Vinton, Gallia county, O., on Friday, February 13th, 1885, Capt. Benj Martin, in his 65th year. Capt. Martin was born in Jackson county, O., January 15, 1821. He served as an apprentice on a farm until he was of age.
     On Dec. 31, 1846, he was married to Miss Mary L. Rothe, who died about one year ago. Mrs. W. S. Matthews was their only child. For quite a number of years Capt. Martin was elected and served as Justice of the Peace in Huntington township. He filled during his lifetime many places of trust and honor in the public service. In 1870 he was admitted to the practice of the law, and continued a member of the Gallipolis bar until his death.
     During the war he raised a company of volunteers, and was commissioned and served as Captain of Co. C. 194th O.V.I., doing service most of the time in the Shenandoah Valley, in Va.

Gallipolis Journal
Wed Feb 18, 1885
Transcribed by Maxine Marshall


Martin, Charles

Chas Martin Dead
     Charles Martin, 75, said to be the first man to enlist from this county in the Civil war, died at the Soldiers' Home at Dayton last week and was buried in the Robinson cemetery at Eno Tuesday. He was twice married and is survived by a son in New Orleans, a married daughter near Danville and a younger daughter who makes her home with Ed Soles and family near Rodney.

Gallipolis Bulletin
Aug 31, 1916
Transcribed by Maxine Marshall


Martin, Henry Clay

Martin
     Mr. Henry c. Martin, of Harrison township, died Friday morning, April 14, 1905, of liver and heart trouble. He had been in ill health for the past two years and had been bedfast for the two weeks previous to his death. He was about 65 years of age and leaves a second wife and several children. Mr. Martin was an honorable, respected citizen and had held several public positions of trust and leaves a wide circle of friends to regret his death.

[Note: He served in co. B, 193rd Ohio Volunteer Infantry. He is buried in Mound Hill Cemetery in Gallipolis Township, 1844-1905.]

Gallipolis Bulletin
April 21, 1905
Transcribed by Henny Evans


Martin, James Perry

Death of James Perry Martin
     Perry Martin of Northup, aged 90 years, 6 months and 27 days, died Sunday evening, Aug 27, 1916. He was an old soldier of the 91st Regiment O.V.I. He was in good health up until within an hour of his death and it was thought his death was due to heart trouble.
    He was born in Halifax county, East Virginia, and came to this county in 1836, settling about a mile from the place where he died and has been an active farmer, and excellent citizen who made a host of friends during his long, useful life.
    His widow, Melissa Martin, and five children survive him. The funeral was conducted Wednesday at 2 p.m. at his late home. Interment at the White cemetery under direction of Myers.

[Death Certificate info: B.Feb 1, 1826 - D.Aug 27, 1916 - Buried in White Cemetery in Walnut Twp - No tombstone]

Gallipolis Journal
Aug 31, 1916
Gallipolis Bulletin
Aug 31, 1916
Transcribed by Maxine Marshall                                                                       Top of Page


Martin, Joseph Franklin

J.F. Martin Dies at Rio Grande Thursday

Former Sheriff Was Last Civil War Veteran in That Village
     Early Thursday morning Joseph F. Martin, the last Civil War veteran in Rio Grande, joined in death his comrades, whose memories were being honored and revered throughout the nation. His death was not unexpected for he had been critically ill of a heart affection [sic] for several weeks. Mr. Martin was well known throughout the county and had been a familiar figure about Rio Grande all his life. He was a former sheriff of Gallia county and prominent in political affairs.
     He was twice married and is survived by his second wife, four children by the first marriage, Clarence, Agnes, Josie, and Emory and two by the last, Hollis and Helen, all of whom had been at his bedside. Miss Etta Martin, a sister, of Gallipolis also survives. Mr. Martin enlisted in the army at the age of fifteen and was one of the youngest to enter service. He was almost eighty two years old. Funeral services will be held Saturday at 2 p.m. at his late home at Rio Grande and burial in charge of W.N. Hayward in the family lot in Mound Hill cemetery.

[Note: He served in Co. B., 91st Ohio Volunteer Infantry.]

Gallipolis Daily Tribune
May 31, 1929
Transcribed by Henny Evans


Martin, Reuben

     The remains of Grasson M. Cole and Reuben Martin, who fell in the Union cause at Selma, Ala., were brought here in April for interment.

[Note: He is buried in Rose Cemetery in Green Township. He served in Co. L, 7th Ohio Volunteer Cavalry. The date on his stone is April 1, 1865, aged 27 years, 4 months and 20 days.]

Information found in an old scrapbook article dated about 1866.
Transcribed by Henny Evans


Martindale, David D.

Granted a Pension
     An original pension has been allowed to Prof. David D. Martindale, of Niobrara, Nebraska, late of Co. E, 141st O.V.I., through the agency of J.A. Martindill, of Eureka, this county. The rate of pension granted is $8 per month from Sept. 10, 1902, date of application, no prior application having ever been made.
     Prof. Martindale is a son of Squire John A. Martindale, of Addison township, this county, and a brother-in-law of Dr. Chas. G. and the late Dr. E.W. Parker of this city. He is at present holding an elective office of Superintendent of public instruction of Knox county, Nebraska, with duties similar to our county board of school examiners.

[Note: David was born about 1848 and grew up in Gallia County. After the war he moved to Nebraska and by 1877 was living in Cass County. In 1900 he was in Knox County where he served as Superintendent of public instruction. By 1920 he was living with his son-in-law in Morrill County. He was 72. After that he can not be found on the census.]

Information compiled from article and census records
Gallipolis Daily Tribune
June 15, 1903
Transcribed by Henny Evans                                                                          Top of Page


Martindale, John A.

Death of John A. Martindale
     Mr. John A. Martindale, of Addison township, long known and respected as an honorable good citizen died this Saturday morning, August 8, 1903, at 3 o’clock at the home of his son-in-law, Mr. Jesse James, of Kyger, aged about 78 years.
     His funeral will be preached by Rev. W. J. Fulton at 10 o’clock Sunday. He was an old soldier, a good citizen and had been Justice of the Peace and held other positions of trust, and was a man well liked by all who knew him.
     He left three sons and three daughters, his wife dying several years ago. Only a part of his children can be here to attend the last sad rites of an affectionate father whom they loved and with whom they parted with regret.

Gallipolis Daily Tribune
Saturday, August 6, 1903
Transcribed by Sandy L. Milliron

Martindale, John

Old Pioneer Gone
     Mr. John Martindale, one of the oldest residents of the county, died at the home of his youngest daughter, Mrs. Minnie James, at Bulaville, last Saturday morning, August 8, 1903, aged 79 years 5 months and 2 days. His wife died 14 years ago.
     Mr. Martindale was born in Meigs County and moved to this county with his parents when only a lad. He was married to Miss Rhoda Plymale, a sister of Hugh, Al, June and John A. Plymale, on July 25, 1846, and to this union 12 children were born, 4 boys and 8 girls and of them 3 boys and 4 girls are living, David, of Nebraska; Hugh, of Huntington, W. Va., and Joseph, of Illinois; and daughters Orinda Kelley, Belle Pierce, Mec. Richmond of Nebraska, and Mrs. Minnie James of Bulaville.
     Mr. Martindale it will be remembered suffered a stroke of paralysis at the home of his nephew, Chas. King, of Clipper Mill, on July 3rd last and though the best of care and medical skill was supplied he gradually became weaker until he passed away as above stated.
     He was a veteran of the civil war having been a member of the 141st Ohio. He repeatedly served his people in positions of trust as Township Trustee, Clerk, Justice and Postmaster at Bulaville and at all times commanded the respect and confidence of all his neighbors. He was a staunch Democrat and served many years on various committees. Always courteous, kind and obliging he was a favorite with all who knew him.
     The funeral services were held Sunday morning by Rev. W. J. Fulton, of Rio Grande, interment following at the Campaign Church by undertaker Hix. Peace to his ashes. Green be the grave where sleeps our departed friend.

[Note: Tombstone has March 6, 1824 - Unit Co E 141st OVI]

Gallipolis Bulletin
Aug 14, 1903
Transcribed by Maxine Marshall


Martindale, John Alexander

     John A. Martindale, 81, a retired farmer and school teacher, died of paralysis Friday at his home in
Columbus. He suffered a stroke of paralysis Thursday.
     Mr. Martindale was a veteran of the Civil War. He leaves five sons, Dr. E.W. Martindale, dentist, W.H., John A., Hoyt and Rose Martindale, living in or near Columbus, and five daughters, Miss Genevieve Martindale, teacher in the Columbus schools, Mrs. Theodore R. Williams of Chester, W.Va., Mrs. F.F. Mackey and Mrs. Warren Harger of East Liverpool, and Mrs. Wilbur Ramsey of Bidwell, Gallia County.
     Funeral services were held at the Glenwood Avenue M.E. Church in Columbus Monday, interment following in Green Lawn cemetery.

[Note: John lived in Gallia County before moving to Columbus. Born 3/14/1839 Died 3/19/1920. He served in Co A, 91st OVI]

Gallia Times
March 25, 1920
Transcribed by Henny Evans


Martindale, Niles Quincy

     Niles, usually called Quince, was born October 7, 1844 in Huntington Township, Gallia County to Alvin and Julia Ewing Martindale. He learned the trade of wood carving from his father. He enlisted in Co. D, 194th Ohio Volunteer Infantry twice.
     In 1876 he went to Warren County, Iowa and in 1877 he married Mary L. Moore. They moved around a bit, back to Gallia County and Vinton County and then Mary moved their three daughters back to Iowa. Thinking divorce proceedings had taken place, he remarried to Nancy Wallace in 1891.
     Niles died November 1, 1927 and is buried in Old Holcomb Cemetery in Huntington Township. Nancy applied for a pension. Things got complicated as even Niles' and Mary's daughter thought her parents were divorced but apparently the attorney had not filed a final action. Congress came to Nancy's rescue when in 1930 a law was enacted declaring Nancy to be the legal wife of Niles. She got her pension.

Created obit from Ewing family research of Nancy Hank Ewing and war records
November 1927
Created by Henny Evans


Martindale, Warren

Obituary
     Warren Martindale was born in Jackson county, O., May 26, 1842, and died Dec. 20, 1887, aged 45 years 6 months 24 days. Since the time he was one year old his home has been in Gallia county. He enlisted in the 53d Ohio Regiment in 1861, and after two years of faithful service as a soldier, he had to accept a discharge on account of broken health. He served as 1st Sergeant, and when discharged he had received a commission as 1st Lieutenant, which position he never accepted because of ill health.
     He was married to Lucretta Weed Oct 26, 1865. Five children, all living, came into the home as a blessing upon this happy union. Mr. Martindale served two terms as County Treasurer and two years as Mayor of Gallipolis. No man in the history of the county has filled these offices better than did our departed brother.          He joined the church in early life, and on the first Sunday after his return from the army, he was found in the class meeting ready for Christian work. He has lived a quiet, devoted life, had great peace in his last hours and has gone to enjoy the reward of a consecrated life.

[Tombstone in Mt. Zion Cemtery has Unit Co E 53rd OVI - Family stone has D. Dec 29, 1887 but obit has
Dec 20. Parents are Alvin & Julia Ewing Martindale. During his service he was commissioned as a first lieutenant into Co A, 1st USCT and was sent to the south to enlist freed slaves in the army.]

Gallipolis Journal
Wed Dec 28, 1887
Transcribed by Maxine Marshall                                                                    Top of Page


Martindill, George Washington

G. W. Martindill Dead
Dies Suddenly While Seated in Chair at Chambersburg
     Mr. G. W. Martindill, retired merchant of Chambersburg, ten miles below this city, died at 3 o'clock this morning of heart trouble, while sitting in his chair. He was on the streets yesterday afternoon, but was taken worse in the night and died before a physician could be called.
     He was about 76 years of age, and leaves a widow, two sons, James of Chicago, and Millard of Cincinnati, and three daughers, Mrs. Addie Stout, a widow of Cincinnati, Mrs. W. H. Jeffers of Huntington, and Mrs. Georgie Gilmore, widow of Len Gilmore, of Raccoon Island.
     Mr. Martindill was an Odd Fellow, member of the Methodist Church and a very fine, well liked man influential and fairly well off. The burial will be at Clay Chapel and Undertaker Wetherhold has charge of the body. Other particulars will not be determined until the arrival of Mrs. Stout.

Gallipolis Daily Tribune
Sept 9, 1913
Transcribed by Maxine Mashall

Died of Heart Trouble
     Mr. G.W. Martindill, aged 76 years, died suddenly at his home at Chambersburg Tuesday morning at 3 o'clock while sitting in his chair. His funeral services will be conducted probably Thursday or when his sons and daughters can arrive home. Mr. Martindill will be recalled as a prosperous merchant of his home town. He is survived by his wife and several adult sons and daughters. He was a member of the M.E. Church and of the I.O.O.F., and was a man with hosts of friends.

[Note: He is buried in Clay chapel Cemetery with the dates, April 14, 1839 to September 9, 1913. He served as a Squirrel Hunter. He first married in 1857 to Leona Roach who died in 1895 and secondly to Mrs. Mary E. Waugh in 1897 who survived him.]

Gallia Times
September 10, 1913
Transcribed by Henny Evans


Martindill, Wesley

     Died on Wednesday morning, March 30, of epilepsy, that peculiar and complicated disease for which there is no cure. He was born Oct. 18th, 1842, being 38 years of age when he passed away.
     He served in the late war, and carried on business for a number of years at Chambersburg, this county, moving to this city about a year ago, and boarding at R. Bray's where he could receive proper medical attention. His sickness was remarkable for its severity and the wonderful manner in which he withstood its attacks.
     He was very popular where known, a man of excellent business ideas and strong in his likes and dislikes. For intellectual capacity he stood very high. Masonic services were held by the lodges of this city and Chambersburg, at the residence of R. Bray, of this city, Friday morning at 10 o'clock, Rev. M. B. Wilson leading in prayer.
     The funeral services of the deceased will be preached at a date unannounced. Mr. Martindale left a widow, formerly Miss Morriszella M. wall, daughter of Dr. C. D. wall. Mr. M. left a will, not yet probated, the contents of which are known only to his attorney.

[Note: Co.E, 23rd OVI]

Gallipolis Journal
Thursday April 7, 1881
Transcribed by Maxine Marshall                                                                      Top of Page


Massie, John

Death of an Old Soldier
     The unwelcome information was received here Wednesday of the death of Mr. John Massie, an old soldier living out at Wales, in consequence of which the sympathy of many go out to his aged widow and family. He has been a long and patient sufferer from consumption which caused his death at 10 o'clok Tuesday, Jan. 4. Deceased was a son of Robert Massie and son-in-law of John Norman. He was a private in Co. A., 91st O.V.I.

Gallipolis Journal
Tues. Jan 11, 1898
Transcribed by Maxine Marshall


Massie, Moses P.

     Died, on the 30th day of May, 1864, Moses P. Massie, son of Robert and A. A. Massie, aged 21 years, 10 months, 14 days. M. P. Massie answered the call of his country, and volunteered in Co. A, 91 Reg. O.V.I. His sickness was contracted while in West Va. He was removed frrom his regiment, to Gallipolis Hospital, there under the care of Dr. Stone, all was done (for) him that could be done, but he was fast failing, his dear parents went after and brought him home. His sufferings were great, but he bore it all patiently; in speaking to him, he would reply with a smile, he placed his soul in Jesus' care and died leaning on the Lord. He was buried on the 31st, when a large number of people gathered to pay their last token of respect to him, when a funeral was preached by Rev. D. C. Thomas Peace to his ashes.

The Gallipolis Journal
July 7, 1864
Transcribed by Eva Swain Hughes


Matthews, John A.

     Mr. John A. Matthews died at the Athens Hospital last Sunday. The remains were brought to Vinton, his home, on Monday and deposited beside his wife, whose sudden death is attribed as the cause of Mr. Matthews losing his mind. He was about 60 years of age and a veteran of the civil war.

[Note: Has stone; Mt Tabor Cemetery; Unit Co I 36th OVI; Born April 30, 1841; Died August 9, 1903]

Gallipolis Bulletin
August 14, 1903
Transcribed by Irene Hively Blamer                                                                  Top of Page


Matthews, Moses Russell

     Moses R. Matthews was born January 26, 1845 in Cheshire Township to Charles and Taphena Holcomb Matthews. He was a journey man carpenter and wagonmaker. He enlisted in Co. H, 53rd Ohio Volunteer Infantry and served four years.
     He married Charlotte Hampton in 1865 and they had two children, Harriett and Charles.They later moved to Columbus and then to Chicago where he died March 28, 1928. His body was returned to Gravel Hill in Cheshire Township for burial.

Created obit from Nancy Hank Ewing research and soldier records
March 28, 1928
Created by Henny Evans


Matthews, Phineas

     Phineas was born in Ohio about 1842 to Aaron and Lydia Roush Matthews. As a child he lived in Huntington Township. He was a private in Co. G, 12th Illinois Cavalry and enlisted from Pilot Grove, Hancock County, Illinois. He married to Alice Ewing. He died March 24, 1916 in Dora, Missouri.

Created obit from Ewing family research of Nancy Hank Ewing and war records
Created by Henny Evans


Matthews, Samantha

Miss Samantha Matthews
     Miss Samantha Matthews, whose death occurred at the home of her brother, the late Charles Matthews, at Washington Thursday, March 16, was one of the large family of the late Mr. and Mrs. Moses Matthews, and was born and spent the greater part of her life in Vinton. She left here about twenty years ago, when her brother was bereft of his companion, to keep house for him and to help brighten his lonely years, which duty she faithfully performed, remaining constantly with him until a few months ago, when he was called to his reward, and since which time she has been gradually failing. She was a sufferer from heart trouble and dropsical affliction, but only kept her bed a couple of days, the end coming as a great shock to her many friends.
     It would seem that her entire life has been spent in serving others, no sacrifice too great for her to make for them. Miss Matthews would have reached her eightieth milestone on May 31, the only surviving members of this large and well known family now being Miss Nan Matthews of Washington, Mrs. Hettie Holcomb of Detroit, and Russell Matthews of Columbus.
     A funeral service was held for her at the home in Washington on Friday, March 17, in charge of the Loyal Legion, of which she was a highly esteemed member, the funeral party leaving at once for Vinton, arriving here Saturday. A short funeral service was held at the home of her niece, Mrs. H.K. Butler by Rev. Wm. Alexander, Monday at 2 p.m., burial following in the Holcomb cemetery, the burial place of many of her deceased friends.

[Note: She is included here because her funeral was by the Loyal Legion, which was a post war organization established by Union veteran officers to further the cause for which they fought and for the benefit of veteran's families.]

Gallia Times
March 23, 1922
Transcribed by Henny Evans


Matthews, Samuel

     Died, in Chicago, Illinois, November 1st, of Camp Fever, Samuel Matthews, in the 26th year of his age. When nineteen years of age, he united with the Baptist Church, and died in hopes of a better world. He volunteered in the 60th Ohio Regiment, on the 17th of last August. His last battle was a glorious triumph, and his end was peace. No more will his pleasant voice be heard around the fireside circle, yet your loss is his gain. It is but a moment till you shall meet on the far shore of the River of Life. Let us who mourn no beloved dead, be greatful [sic], be humble to God that no blow has fallen upon our homes. May he drop the dews of his healing on the hearts, torn with anguish, for which there is neither help [n]or consolation. His remains were brought home, and now sleep a few yards from his birthplace.

The Gallipolis Journal
December 11, 1862
Transcribed by Eva Swain Hughes


Matthews, Thomas Corwin

     DIED--At the Regimental Hospital, Covington, Kentucky, on Saturday, the 6th of February, 1864, of Measels and Pneumonia, Thomas Corwin Matthews, of Co. G., 1st Regiment Ohio Heavy Artillery, son of Phineas Matthews of Vinton, Gallia Co., O. Aged nineteen years.
     His remains were brought by his father to Vinton, where, after a very impressive discourse by Rev. R. Breare, from Proverbs 4 and 18, "But the path of the just is as a shining light, that shineth more and more unto the perfect day." The remains were interred with military honors.
     The deceased was, in all things, a goodly young man; the pride of his family, and the admiration of his friends. In the summer of 1862, though a boy, he volunteered in the 60th Regiment O. V. I., commanded by Col. Trimble, was taken prisoner at Harper's Ferry, on the 15th of September, 1862, parolled, sent to Annapolis, thence to Chicago, where, he, with his regiment, was discharged and afterwards exchanged. In June, 1863, he volunteered as a soldier in the 1st Regiment Ohio Heavy Artillery, for a term of three years. After entering the service in this Regiment, his deportment was such as to commend him to the favorable consideration of Col. Hawley, the Commandant, who detailed him as his Orderly, in which position he discharged every duty with promptness and fidelity, until about the 12th of January, when he was taken sick of measles and pneumonia, with which he lingered until the 6th of February, when, while repeating the Lord's Prayer, he was promoted from the patriotic armies of earth, to the celestial army of patriots on high. Thus have we another martyr to the great cause of freedom and enfranchisement.
     Proudly do the national patriots recall the high deeds of valor of our gallant sons. With unfaltering courage and heroic bravery, they have borne themselves in every contest, and whether on the tented field or in the dreaded hospital; whether on the long and weary march, or before the murderous fire of traitor bands everywhere, and under every circumstance, have they borne themselves with veteran intrepidity; shrinking from no anger; quailing under no assaults, but attesting their prowess in every battle [rest cut off.]

[Note: - Buried in Vinton Memorial cemetery, Vinton, Ohio.]

Gallipolis Journal
February 18, 1864
Transcribed by Margaret Calvin                                                                       Top of Page


Matthews, Timothy Smith

Memoir of T. S. Matthews
     T. S. Matthews was born at Vinton Gallia county, October 4th, 1834, and was one of a large family of brothers and sisters, many of whom survive him. He was married November 17th, 1864, to Frances Chappelle. From this union there have been three children, Adele, Gertrude and Avery P. all of whom, together with their mother, are still living.
     In the first year of the civil war, he enlisted as a private in the 36th Ohio, and in the summer of ’63 was promoted to the rank of Major in the 1st O.H.A., serving in that capacity until the end of the war. In 1868, he removed from Middleport, O., to this city where he has since resided. During the earlier part of his residence here he engaged in mercantile pursuits; more recently he became president of the 1st National Bank, which position he held at the time of his death. He was twice a member of the city council, served many years on the school board and was in many ways related to the public and business interests of the city.
     Major Matthews was long and prominently associated with the Masons. He has held at various times the following positions: Sec’y of Trowel Lodge 132; W.M. of the same and was also its Treasurer for a number of years; Sec’y of Chapter No 70 and its High Priest; Treasurer of Council No. 71; Royal and Select Master, and was Recorder at the time of his death; Past Em Com of Jackson Commandery No 58, K T; has been Secretary of the Masonic Association from the beginning. He died Oct. 29th, 1895.
     “And the work of righteousness shall be peace; and the effect of righteousness, quietness and assurance forever”
     Timothy Smith Matthews was born in Vinton. Gallia county, Ohio, October 4th, 1834, died October 30th, 1895. From the parents of the highest integrity he inherited those noble qualities which lifted him above the average man. His early education was received at the public schools, at academical schools in Marietta and Gallipolis and at a commercial school in Columbus. In his boyhood he worked in his father’s tan yard, later teaching school, clerking and working on his father’s farm.
     At the first call for troops in April 1861, he went to Columbus to enlist in a cavalry company, but as the regiment could not be completed, he returned to his father’s farm, where he remained until October. He then enlisted in the 36th O V I, serving with this regiment at Lewisburg, Va, May 23rd, at Second Bull Run August 30th, at Frederick, Md, Sept 12th, at South Mountain, Sept 14th and at Antietam, Sept 17th, 1862. In Sept 1862 he was made 1st Lieutenant and Adjutant of the 117th O V I. On the reorganization of that regiment as the 1st O H A. in May 1863, he was promoted to Major serving as such till the close of the war, July 25th 1865. It was in the service of his country that he showed, in the highest degree, those manly and soldierly qualities which won the regard of his superior officers and endeared him to his regiment. Not only was he brave and patriotic, but kind and considerate to his men. Many times have comrades come to him in after years, to tell him of some kindly office performed for them which he had long forgotten. He never wore his badge of authority with arrogance. To his superior officers he accorded all the respect due their rank, but did not fear to resent an arbitrary assertion of power. Of his inferiors he demanded the same deference to his rank, but beyond the necessary discipline, he was a brother, a comrade.
     While still in service he was married to Frances Chappelle, November 17th 1864. At the close of the war they removed to Middleport, where he engaged in the hardware business. In October 1868, they removed to Jackson. Here he engaged in the same business for fifteen years, when he became Vice President, afterward, President of the First National Bank. He was a member of the Masonic Order, having joined the Vinton Lodge at the age of twenty one. As a worker in the Jackson Lodge and Commandery, he was active and trustworthy, receiving in the great honor and respect shown him, only the just reward for faithful service. He was unselfish in his devotion to this family, faithful to his friends, conscientious in all his relations with men. Loving Truth and Justice, pure and temperate in living, he lived his life unswayed by public opinion. His wife, two daughters and a son survive him.

“We live in deeds not years: In thoughts and breaths:
In feelings, not in figures on a dial.
We should count time by heart throbs. He most lives
Who thinks most, feels the noblest, acts the best.”

[Note: He is buried in Fairmount Cemetery, Jackson County, Ohio.]

Jackson Standard, Jackson, Ohio
November 6, 1895
Transcribed by Donna Scurlock


Matthews, William Symmes

Tribute to the Memory of William Symmes Matthews
Assistant Adjutant and Quartermaster General Department of Ohio Grand Army of the Republic
     William Symmes Matthews was born at Vinton, Gallia County, Ohio, January 1st, 1847, and died at his home, 902 Franklin Ave., Columbus, Ohio, Sunday, February 7th, 1926, aged 79 years, 1 month and 7 days.
The many friends of W.S. Matthews, Assistant Adjutant and Quartermaster General of the Department of Ohio Grand Army of the Republic, including his wide acquaintance among the comrades of the Grand Army throughout the nation, were stunned by the news of his death, which came as a great shock also to his immediate household.
     He was stricken on December 31st, 1925, in his office at Department Headquarters, Memorial Hall, Columbus, Ohio, with an attack of acute indigestion, so pronounced, accompanied by a slight cerebral disturbance, from which he soon rallied and was thought to be slowly, but steadily improving until Sunday, February 7th, when the end came unexpectedly, the immediate cause of his death being due to pulmonary embolism, or blood clot, stopping the circulation.
     Funeral services were held in J.M. Wells Post room at Memorial Hall Wednesday, February 10th, at 2 P.M., Rev. W.G. Price of the First Universalist church of Columbus, Ohio, being the officiating minister. The Ritualistic Memorial service of the Grand Army, held at J.M. Wells Post, of which he was a member, was conducted by the Commander of the Ohio Department Grand Army of the Republic, John Ambler of Youngstown. Mrs. Blanche Price, soloist of the First Universalist church, beautifully sang, "No Sorrow There," "Some Sweet Day" and "Abide with Me."
     The services were attended by a large body of people, including an unusually large representation of the Grand Army and other patriotic orders, both local and from all parts of the state. The many beautiful floral tributes--tokens of love and esteem--were from individual friends and from the various patriotic and other orders to which he belonged, or which desired to honor his memory. The honorary pall-bearers were his intimate associates among the comrades of the G.A.R.--L.N. Conard, Walton Weber, David F. Pugh, D.S. Wilder, Chas. H. Durfey, John McClay, William Miller and Fred Knagi. The active pall-bearers were from the Sons of Veterans' Camp. His body was laid to rest in Greenlawn cemetery beside that of his wife.
     He is survived by one sister, Mrs. Abigail Shannon of Columbus, Ohio, three brothers, Edward B. of Jackson, Ohio, H. Greeley, of Mantako, Minn., and Stanley of Columbus, Ohio, besides numerous other relatives and friends. One cousin, Miss Lida S. Lucas, has for several years made her home with him and was his Secretary in the Department of Ohio Grand Army Headquarters, from September, 1919, (excepting a few months in 1922) until the close of his life.
     He was married at Vinton, Ohio, December 6th, 1880, to Alice E. Martin, who preceded him to the Better Land, January 16th, 1922. The union was not blessed with offspring.
     In a remarkable and surprising degree he carried his youth into old age, being noted for his vigorous power of both mind and body. His intellect was keen, clear and active, his step, quickly, firm and elastic, his health and physical being, sound and normal. In his last illness he remarked that the Lord had been especially good to him in that he had had been ill so seldom.
     Mr. Matthews life was one of great activity and usefulness; his career varied, distinguished and laudable.
In June, 1863, at the age of sixteen, as a Private in Co. G, 1st Ohio Heavy Artillery, he enlisted in the Civil War in the service of his country and was mustered out with his Company, July 25th, 1865, and discharged at Camp Dennison, Ohio, August 1st, 1865. His army life and experiences were to him a source of great pride and satisfaction.
     Following his discharge from the service, he entered the Ohio University at Athens, where he remained as a student for a period of some three years, after which, still in his early manhood, he engaged in teaching school, being a successful teacher in various places in Ohio, Illinois and Kentucky. He occupied many positions of public trust and honor, which he filled with marked ability and credit, holding all such in sacred faithfulness and was never known to violate or betray a trust reposed in him.
     As a young man he took an active interest in politics, being devoted to the principles of the Republican party. His first prominent political office was that of Message Clerk in the Senate during the 64th and 65th General Assemblies. A litte later, in 1883, he was elcted to represent his County, Gallia, in the State Legislature, and was re-elected to that body two years later, serving the two consecutive terms in the 66th and 67th General Assemblies. He achieved considerable recognition in the House by reason of his close
application to Committee work and his brilliant successes on the floor as a speaker. He was an able speaker and during his political career, earned an enviable reputation as a political and campaign orator.
     In 1887 he was appointed Chief Clerk in the State School Commissioner's office, where he remained until May, 1896 serving under the administrations of Professors Eli. T. Tappan, John Hancock, Chas. C. Miller and Oscar T. Corson. In 1896 he was selected by Governor Bushnell to serve as State Insurance Commissioner, which office he filled with distinction and honor for a period of four years, making a record unequaled by any predecessor.
     He was three times elected Secretary of the Republican State Ececutive Committee, in 1891, 1895 and 1896, and twice endorsed by his County for the Congressional nomination in the 10th District.
His integrity, ability, faithfulness and enery, made him a brave soldier, a wise legislator, a successful political manager, an efficient public official and a faithful friend.
     After he vacated the office of State Insurance Commissioner, for a few years he was engaged in the insurance business and other private business in Toledo since which time his activities have been largely devoted to the Grand Amry of the Republic. He was appointed Assistant Adjustant General of the Department of Ohio G.A.R. in 1909, by the Department Commander at that time, Chas. H. Newton of Marietta, and the high esteem, comradeship and warm affection that ever since extended between
them, was that of brothers. He served the Department in this capacity from that time to the close of his life--a period of over sixteen years--with the additional office of Assistant Quartermaster General since 1914, being re-appointed to these offices by each successive Department Commander. As all Grand Army comrades know, he was devoted to the interests of the Grand Army. No comrade was more widely known, or more highly esteemed than he. His familiar figure at Department and National encampments will be sadly missed. In his death the Ohio Department Grand Army of the Republic has sustained an irreparable loss--the loss of one of its most efficient officers, loyal, patriotic and devoted workers, a conscientious, high-souled man. He was a member of the Masonic Fraternity for many years, holding his membership with the Vinton Lodge.
     The character of Genearl Matthews was irreproachable. He loved truth and honor and scorned to stoop below his high standard of morals and conduct for any reason. He was a man whom to know was to admire, honor and esteem. He had the happy faculty of winning friendship without resorting to flattery or obsequiousness, and his friends were legion, among whom were numbered many notable personages. His manner was characterized by simplicity, plainness, directness and sincerity--utterly without affection. He despised hypocrisy or deception of any kind or form.
     He was a profound thinker and a great reader. His extensive library attests the value he placed upon books, the content of which, in a large degree, bear evidence of having been well read. It contains many valuable volumes of classic literature, though largely historical, scientific and biographical. Being an ardent admirer of Lincoln, he was especially well read on the subject and possessed a valuable collection of works on the life and character of the great Emancipator. He was always well posted upon current events and took great interest in the affiars of state and nation.
     His was a delightful personality. Intellectual, well-informed and genial, possessing a keen sense of humor, a ready, spontaneous wit and pleasing conversational powers, he was always a social favorite and a delightful companion. He was generous to a fault, if such a virtue can ever be termed a fault, for he seldom, if ever, refused his aid, finanacial or otherwise, when appealed to, and many a young person has had him to thank for timely assistance in the hour of trouble. His many acts of kindness, unselfishness and generosity will shine in the memory of his friends as stars in his crown.
     He was deeply religious and reverential, but no degree dogmatic. In the matter of religion and doctrine, as in everything else, his views were based on reason and characterized by broad-mindedness and charity. He was for many years a member of the Universalist church and was interested not only in its advancement, but in the advancement of the church at large.
     Tributes to his memory have been numerous, from friends and comrades in all part(s) of the country. Some one said, "His burial was like that of a Prince, but unlike a Prince, he deserved it."
     His life was an open book whose pages were unsullied. The life he lived and the record he has left behind have builded him a more worthy monument and one that will longer endure than granite or marble.

To tell the story of his life and deeds,
No monument or marble shaft he needs:
The record of his life--its varied parts
Is graven on the tablets of fond hearts.


                                   Lida S. Lucas
                                   Secretary Department of Ohio G.A.R.

Gallia Times
April 1, 1926
Transcribed by Henny Evans                                                                          Top of Page


Mauck, Amos O.

Capt. Mauck is Mustered Out
     The interment of Capt. Amos Mauck who died the latter part of the week at the Dayton Soldier's Home, was at Cheshire, his former residence, Monday afternoon. Rev. J. M. Davis of Rio Grande conducted the services. Capt. Mauck saw service during the civil war in the 141st Ohio and the Fourth Virginia. He was a miller by trade and is well remembered by many old friends here. One brother, J. W. Mauck, president of Hillsdale College in Michigan, survives him.

Gallia Times
October 11, 1916

Captain A. O. Mauck
Passes Away, Aged Nearly 74- Burial at Cheshire
     Captain Amos O. Mauck, born near Cheshire Nov. 29, 1842, died at Dayton Sunday, Oct. 8, 1916. His parents were Joseph and Adaline Sigler Mauck. He was a big, jolly, open-hearted, popular man. One of his second cousins said he never knew anyone who had such a large proportion of warm friends among his acquaintances as Amos Mauck.
     In 1861 he enlisted in the regimental band of the 4th Virginia. The band was mustered out in the fall of 1862. He organized Co. D, 141 O. V. I., in 1864, serving as captain until mustered out 100 days later. Among the surviving members of this company are Joseph Roush, George W. Bing, S. F. Coughenour, S. H. Jacobs, Benj. Jenkins, C. H. McCormick, Frank Souverain, George N. Swisher and Eli Wheaton.
     He engaged successively in mercantile business at Cheshire; flour mills at Middleport and Groveport; in coal mines which he traded 20 years ago for the Moore farm near Yorktown, Va., on which General Cornwallis surrendered to Washington. He was appointed a member of the State Board of Agriculture and Immigration by the Governor of Virginia. He was in the real estate business in Norfolk until infirmities sent him to the Soldiers Home. He had been in declining mental and physical health for the past 5 or 6 years.
     Mr. Mauck is survived by his widow, formerly Victoria Scott, who now lives at Pickerington, near Columbus, and two brothers, Sigler Mauck, a teacher at Burton, Ohio, and Joseph William Mauck, president of Hillsdale, (Mich.) College. The decedent was the oldest of 7 children.
     The body arrived at Cheshire on the H. V. train Monday afternoon and was taken at once to the Baptist Church where funeral services were conducted by Dr. J. M. Davis, assisted by Rev. Y. H. Reed and Rev. G. S. Lightner. J. W. Mauck also spoke of his brother's life, of his relations to the older folk of Cheshire. He impressed on his hearers that it was not an occasion for mourning and bitter tears but that he regarded it as a sort of farewell party to his brother Amos. He did not deliver a prepared address but in an informal and conversational way paid a beautifully simple tribute to the departed.
     The body was taken to Gravel Hill cemetery for burial under the auspices of the Masons led by H. B. Gentry. Mr. Mauck was a charter member of the Masonic Lodge at Cheshire.

Gallipolis Journal
October 12, 1916
Transcriptions by Lynn Anders                                                                       Top of Page


Mauck, Amos

     Capt. Amos Mauck passed away at the Soldiers' Home at Dayton Friday. The remains were brought to Cheshire, where the funeral was conducted Monday afternoon by Rev. J. M. Davis. Capt. Mauck was a former resident of Cheshire and is survived by a brother. J. W. Mauck, President of Hillsdale College in Michigan. He was a veteran of the Civil War, having been a member of the 141st Ohio and the 4th Virginia Regiments.

[Note: Has stone; Gravel Hill Cemetery; Born November 29, 1842; Died October 8, 1916]

Gallipolis Bulletin
October 12, 1916
Transcribed by Irene Hively Blamer


Mauck, Eli Robert, Capt.

Capt. Eli Mauck Dies at Wheeling
     Word has been received here of the death of Captain Eli Robert Mauck, 82 years old, widely known river man, at his home in Wheeling Saturday. He was a native of Gallia county, and had many relatives in Gallia and Lawrence counties.
     After serving throughout the Civil War as a member of the Ninety-first Ohio Volunteers, he began a successful career as a steamboatman. He became a master and clerk and commanded some of the largest boats on the Ohio and Mississippi, and later became freight and passenger agent of all boats plying between Pittsburgh and Cincinnati. He held this position at Cincinnati until a few years before his death or until the passing of the last Pittsburgh & Cincinnati Packet Line composed of the Queen City, Keystone State and Virginia.
Capt. Mauck was clerk of the famous sidewheel Fleetwood in the Cincinnati and Pomeroy trade and he was ___ on the Wild Wagner (?). Capt. Mauck belonged in the old school of great boatmen and was held in high esteem by all who knew him. Capt. Mauck steamboated back in the days of such expert navigators as Capt. Wash Kerr, Capt. Kirker, Capt. Williamson, Capt. Holloway, Capt. Knowles, Capt. Calhoun, Capt. Tillison, Capt. Maddy, Capt. Campbell, Capt. L__, Capt. Hubleman, Capt. Huntington, Capt. Knox, all of whom passed several years ago. Their like will never again be seen on the upper Ohio, nor, will such packet boats as ran in their days.

Gallipolis Daily Tribune
December 23, 1924
Transcribed by Henny Evans


Mauck, Lewis W.

     Lewis W. Mauck born May 7, 1844 died June 17, 1883. Got good practical education in community school and Cheshire Academy. Volunteered in Sept. 1861 and was discharged Sept. 1862 disabled. His health being somewhat recruited he went out in the ‘One Hundred Days Service.”
     May 16,, 1866 married Fannie A. Bradbury who with 3 children survive. At close of war he engaged in merchandising and led an active business life until May 1878. During a part of his business life he published a newspaper called “Mauck Hearld”. In June 1878 he contracted a violent cold which resulted in pulmonary consumption, the cause of his death. The winter of 1878-9 he spent in Florida for his health but returned in the spring no better. Soon after by his extensive reading, he learned of Dr. Salisbury of Cleveland, who treated lung disease. He applied to him for relief and continued his treatment constantly ‘til his death. The diet of beef and hot water probably prolonged his life a few years.
     He was a man whom it was a great pleasure to know and converse with. He had seen much of the world and had read extensively. What he saw he observed attentively and what he read he remembered and reasoned upon. Consequently his conversation was not gossip, but a clear and discriminating discussion of history, current events and other important subjects. He watched the progress of his disease carefully and accurately understood the nature of treatment which had been adopted. But this did not seem to produce a morbid self-conciousness, or lead, him to think alone of himself and his afflictions. This was illustrated in the last conversation which the writer had with him. He spoke of his sons, briefly mentioning the mental peculiarities of each and the pursuits in life for which he thought them adapted by nature.
     He was a son of Daniel Mauck.

Gallipolis Journal
June 20, 1883
Transcribed by J. Farley

Mauck, Lewis W.

     Lewis W. Mauck was born May 7, 1844, and died June 17, 1883. He obtained a good practical education in the public schools and Cheshire Academy. He volunteered in the military service of his country in Sept. 1861, and was discharged for disability in September 1862. His health being somewhat recruited he went out in the "one hundred day's service." On May 18, 1860, he was married to Fanny A Bradbury, who with their three sons, survives him. At the close of the war he engaged in merchandising, and led an active business life until May, 1878. During a part of his business life he published a newspaper called "Mauck's Herald." In June 1878, he contracted a violent cold which resulted in pulmonary consumption, the cause of his death. The winter of 1878-9 he spent in Florida for his health, but returned in the spring no better. Soon after by his extensive reading, he learned of Dr. Salisbury, of Cleveland, who treated lung disease. He applied to him for relief and continued his treatment constantly till his death. The diet of broiled beef and hot water probably prolonged his life a few years.
     He was a man whom it was a great pleasure to know and converse with. He had seen much of the world and had read extensively. What he saw he observed attentively, and what he read he remembered and reasoned upon. Consequently his conversation was not gossip, but a clear and discriminating discussion of history, current events, and other important subjects. He watched the progress of his disease carefully and accurately understood the nature of the treatment which had been adopted. But this did not seem to produce a morbid self-consciousness, or lead him to think alone of himself and his afflictions. This was illustrated in the last conversation which the writer had with him. He spoke of his sons, briefly mentioning the mental peculiarities of each and the pursuits in life for which he thought them best adapted by nature. He then spoke of the present agitation of the temperance question, and confidently expressed his conviction that the liquor traffic could be conquered, not simply compromised with. Few then, even in health, with good expectation of years of active public life, have a deeper and more intelligent interest in important public events then he had.
     In his illness, when addressed on the subject of religion, he responded cordially, and warmly expressed his thanks for this form of interest in his welfare. He declared his firm belief in the divine origin of the gospel of Jesus Christ. He did not in the same unreserved manner declare his personal, acceptance of the Redeember and trust in Him, or distinctly assert that he had learned to apply the gospel to his heart, as a full source of comfort and hope; but some men express their inmost feelings with less freedom than they do their mental convictions.
     He is gone from us. The long, weary endurance of pain and wasting sickness is over. He is at rest. His kindred give united testimony to the uncomplaining patience with which he bore his sickness of the years. To these relatives it is only the most meagre justice to say that everything which love and labor and lavish expensed and medical knowledge and skill could do to avert his death, to prolong his life, or to diminish his sufferings, has been freely and constantly done.
     On Wednesday, June 20th, the writer preached his funeral to a large and sympathetic audience gathered at the residence of his father, Daniel Mauck, Esq. and his body was buried in the Gravel Hill Cemetery, according to the ritual of the Masonic order of which he was a member.

                                                                                              J. M. Davis
[Note: Has stone; Sergeant, Co. H 53rd OVI & Co. D, 141st OVI (National Guard)]

Gallipolis Journal
June 28, 1883
Transcribed by Irene Hively Blamer                                                                 Top of Page


Mauck, Robert

Robert Mauck Dead at Cheshire Home After Long Period of Ill Health and Physical Weakness
     Robert Mauck, a lifelong and highly respected citizen of Cheshire, died today after a year or more of ill health, leaving a widow and two children. His wife is a sister of Mr. E.J. Resener of this city, and his children are Stanley, a student at the Ohio Wesleyan University, and Mrs. Ann Thompson of Cincinnati.
     Mr. Mauck was a bookkeeper, and about 70 years of age. He was a veteran of the Civil War and a member of Siloam Lodge of Freemasons. The funeral will be Friday, but the hour is not yet fixed.
     Mr. Mauck was a cousin of the late Isaac Mauck, and distantly related to Judge Mauck of this city. The news of his death will be heard with regret by many friends all over the county.

[Note: He is buried at Gravel Hill Cemetery in Cheshire Cemetery. He served in Co. D, 141st O.V.I.]

Gallipolis Daily Tribune
February 25, 1915
Transcribed by Henny Evans


Maxon, Hannah

Miss Hannah U. Maxon Dead
Prominent and Good Woman Passes Away After Long Illness.
     It is with regret and sorrow that we record the death of Miss Hannah Utley Maxon. The sad event occurred at her home on 2d Avenue between Cedar and Spruce streets Thursday evening, May 26, 1910 of a malignant and painful trouble that had caused her great pain and suffering for three or four months.
     The funeral services will be conducted at the First Presbyterian Church of this city Sunday afternoon at 2 o’clock by the Presbyterian minister of Middleport and Pomeroy, the interment following at the Pine street cemetery by Hayward on the family lot among her kindred. At this time the pallbearers had not been selected. 
     Miss Maxon was the daughter of the late Samuel and Eliza Maxon, permanent residents of this city fifty or sixty years ago, and was born in the corner brick house at State street and 2d avenue in October, 1840 and was consequently in her 70th year. She had brothers and sisters who died in infancy, but more who reached an adult age but the late John J. Maxon and Mrs. Lucy Cherrington, widow of the late William Cherrington, being the last of the family to survive her.
     Miss Maxon had talent and applied herself at the best schools the city afforded, being one of that famous throng of pupils that gave the Gallia Academy a fame that has not yet perished, for many years and was a graduate of the Springfield, O., Female College. Splendidly equipped for life’s battles she began her career of teaching in the Public Schools when less than 20 years old. After teaching here awhile she taught in Springfield for perhaps a couple of years. 
     Returning to this city the war of the Rebellion broke out. Everybody became disturbed, distracted and demoralization of regular business and the general order of things prevailed. There was an immense Military Camp laid out on the site of what is now the State Hospital grounds, and there were long rows of hospital building(s) there. The ladies of the city became helpers to this hospital and carried flowers and delicacies not belonging to army regulations to the sick, wounded and perishing soldiers there. Miss Maxon by her zeal and activity became prominent in this work, and took a leading part, and no doubt brought comfort and solace to many a weary one, who was far away from home and any soft and tender female hand to make smooth his dying pillow. She became an enthusiast and really was a local army nurse until the close of the war when she again took up the occupation of teaching which she had never entirely dropped and spent at least forty years in this work.
     Yet interspersed with it she found time to become a leader of temperance work, of Sunday School work and after the organization of the G.A.R. Posts, of Woman’s Relief Corp work. She was President of the Relief Corps here auxilliary to Cadot Post G.A.R. many times, met with other posts throughout the county and while yet a comparatively young woman had achieved a reputation among the military organizations of the G.A.R. all over Ohio. She became the Department President of the W.R.C. of the State and was Chaplain of the National organization when she died, a position she had held for several years and if her health had continued good would no doubt have been elected National President. She had become so well known by her beautiful, charming and eloquent addresses all over many states that she never put in appearance without without receiving the greatest applause. She was indeed a beautiful speaker. Thoroughly enthused with her topic she sometimes talked almost as one inspired and her audience would go wild in their applause.
     No Decoration Day came around that Miss Maxon was not looked for. Always with a well trained corps of little girls she put in the day in the most sacred way scattering floral tributes among their graves, lifting high their voices in sweet songs of praise.
     Miss Maxon had faults, perhaps, but her noble character and charming talents obscured them entirely from the sight of those who knew her. Her career is ended, but how few of us will have it said of us as it can be said truthfully of her that our entire life was spent in uplifting and bettering the conditions of those surrounding us. It is like gold to dross to compare these attributes of character with those who leave behind nothing but great wealth. The poor and needy, the sick and suffering, found in her a friend. 
     Every noble cause found in her an advocate and one of force power. She has gone to her reward.  Certainly she did receive it here. It must be somewhere in God’s kingdom for her. Surely some goodly angel stands, ready to place upon her head a crown of glory as enduring as time. 

Gallipolis Daily Tribune
27 May 1910
Transcribed by Henny Evans                                                                          Top of Page 


Maxwell, John Lewis

     It is with regret that we announce the death of a good old man in the person of John Lewis Maxwell, who died Wednesday morning, Aug. 17, 1904, at the ripe old age of 78 years.Mr. Maxwell was a currier of leather by trade and spent his early life in Pennsylvania.
     He was married to his esteemed wife in Monroe County, this state, in 1853, and by this union came three children, only one of whom is living, our efficient Hocking Valley Agent, L. A. Maxwell. The deceased's wife also survives him, with whom the many friends will join in sympathy.
     Mr. Maxwell was a soldier in the great war of the rebellion having served for three years in the 90th O. V. I. from which he received an honorable discharge. At the time of his death he was receiving $12 per month pension for injuries received during that war. He had been failing for the past year and a half but had only been confined to his bed three weeks. He left several grand children and great grand children in whom he took a kindly interest.
     The funeral will be conducted today at his late home. The interment by Wetherholt at Pine Street cemetery. Rev. W. H. Miller, of Grace M. E. Church, conducted the religious ceremonies, Messrs. T. P. Williams, J. E. Wood, S. B. Winters, J. E. Harrison, A. R. Weaver and D. A. Barton will be the pall-bearers.

[Note: Has stone; Born August 1829; Unit Co G 90th OVI]

Gallipolis Bulletin
August 19, 1904
Transcribed by Irene Hively Blamer                                                                  Top of Page


McBride, George D.

     George D. McBride died Friday morning about 2 o'clock, after a week's illness with pneumonia, at his residence 447 Second Avenue. His age was exactly 78 years and 9 months. His nephew, Harry E. Kelly, of Pennsylvania, was with him at the end. Pneumonia and a general break down caused his death. Until very recently he had appeared mentally and physically strong.McBride, George D.McBride, George D.
     George D. McBride died Friday morning about 2 o'clock, after a week's illness with pneumonia, at his residence 447 Second Avenue. His age was exactly 78 years and 9 months. His nephew, Harry E. Kelly, of Pennsylvania, was with him at the end. Pneumonia and a general break down caused his death. Until very recently he had appeared mentally and physically strong.
    Mr. McBride came to Gallia county shortly after the War, in which he served in the 78th Pa, Infantry, and went into the wagon and blacksmithing business at Cheshire with Robert Coleman. His trade was that of a blacksmith, but he became greatly interested in music, and gave up his partnership to teach it and sell organs and other musical instruments. He established a business here that continued to the day of his death.
    He was prominent in Masonic circles for many years and thus acquired an extensive acquaintance thruout the state. He had served as Grand High Priest and Grand Master of the Grand Chapter and Grand Council, respectively, of Ohio. He was also for many years a trustee of the Ohio Masonic Home at Springfield, an institution in which he was deeply interested.
    He was president of the McBride family association of Pennsylvania.He was a pleasant, affable man and fond of the society of his old friends; a man of mental and physical power and stalwart and dignified in bearing.
    The funeral services were held at 1:30 Sunday at the residence under the auspices of the Masons, Rev. A. J. Wilder officiating. Burial at Mound Hill by Wetherholt. The pall bearers were C. M. Adams, J. S. Clark, Dr. J. T. Hanson, Tom Bell, Henry Skinner and J. C. Butz.

[Note: Has stone; Born June 10, 1837; Died March 10, 1916; Death Record Vol II; Unit Co H 78th Pa. VI]

Gallipolis Journal
March 16, 1916
Transcribed by Irene Hively Blamer


McCain, Francis Webb

Mr. McCain Dead
     Francis Webb McCain, a former well known resident of Bidwell where for a number of years he conducted a sawmill, died Wednesday, June 24, at the home of his daughter, Mrs. Will Flack at Leon, W.Va. He had been ill for about ten weeks, and the end came suddenly while seated in his chair.
     Mr. McCain was born in 1842, and is survived by six brothers and sisters, one of whom is Mrs. Retta Frederick of Bidwell, this county. He leaves his wife and two daughters, Mrs. Ed McElhinny of Columbus and Mrs. Flack of Leon, eleven grandchildren and one great-grandchild. Mr. McCain served three years and three months with an Indiana regiment during the war. He was a man of sterling character, a true Christian, and his former friends here will learn of his death with sorrow.

[Note: He served in Co. K, 82nd Indiana Infantry.]

Gallia Times
July 1, 1914
Transcribed by Henny Evans


McCalla, Morris

     Morris McCalla, a veteran of the Civil War, died at his home at Clipper Mill on Thursday evening of heart trouble at the age of 72 years. The funeral was held at Mt. Zion church Sunday afternoon, burial following at the same place. Mr. McCalla had made his home with his daughter Amanda since the death of his wife some nine years ago. He also is survived by four sons; Morris, William, Lewis and John. Mr. McCalla was a good citizen and neighbor and had the respect of many long time friends.

[Note: Has stone; Mt. Zion Cemetery; Born 1847; Died 1919; Unit Co A 40th Ky MJ]

The Gallia Times
October 1, 1919
Transcribed by Irene Hively Blamer                                                                  Top of Page


McCarley, Elnathan Barlow

E.B. McCarley Dead
     E.B. McCarley, son of Moses and Sarah McCarley, was born Nov. 25, 1835, and died March 1, 1917, aged 81 years, 3 months and 6 days. He was united in marriage on Jan. 1, 1857, to Mary Glassburn, who
preceded him in death on Dec. 5, 1904. To this union were born five children, all of whom survive and
live not far from the home place. They are Mrs. W.E. Jones, J.M. McCarley, Mrs. Luther Woods, T.E. McCarley and H.A. McCarley.
     Mr. McCarley united with the Harris Free Will Baptist Church about the year 1890. He was a kind neighbor and a loving father, as was evidenced by the care he received during his last illness. The end came quietly and peacefully just after dinner as he sat before the fire in a chair.
     Five children, thirteen grandchildren, three great-grandchildren, a number of other relatives and a host of friends...(rest of sentence is illegible)
     The funeral was held last Sunday forenoon at the Baptist Church in Rio Grande conducted by Rev. W.J. Fulton, the burial following by H.K. Butler of Vinton.

[Note: He served as a Squirrel Hunter.]

Gallia Times
March 7, 1917
Transcribed by Henny Evans


McCarley, Franklin

In Memorian
     Whereas, it has pleased God in all His wise providence to remove from our Post by death our most worthy and esteemed Comrade, Franklin McCarley, and
     Whereas, we are made to realize that man born of woman is of few days and full of trouble; He cometh forth as a flower and is cut down; therefore,
     Resolved, that we deeply feel our loss and shall ever cherish the memory of our departed Comrade, and shall ever hold his virtues in sacred rememberance, and that his many good deeds will live after him.
     Resolved, that we extend our sympathy in his bereaved family, and that they may feel their loss in his eternal gain.
     By order of Amos Carter Post, Number 388, G. A. R., Patriot, Ohio.
     F. G. Stewart, H. C. Carter, J. W. Neal

Gallipolis Bulletin
Volume XXIV
Number 31
June 16, 1891
Gallipolis, Ohio
Transcribed By: MLT


McCartney, John F.

Old Soldier Passes On
     John P. McCartney, 82, a veteran of the civil war, passed away Wednesday at his home at Cadmus. The funeral was Friday at Sandfork Church. He was a member of the Fourth Ohio Cavalry. He is survived by his wife and three children.  Mr. McCartney had been ill for sometime with hardening of the arteries.

[Note: Has stone; Sandfork Cemetery; Born 1835; Died 1917; Unit Co I 4th OVC]

The Gallia Times
May 30, 1917
Transcribed by Irene Hively Blamer                                                                 Top of Page


McCarty, Samuel Rowley

     Samuel Rowley McCarty, son of Benjamin and Eliza Rowley McCarty, was born Jan. 13, 1842, and died March 3, 1919, at the age of 77 years, 1 month and 18 days. He was one of the few remaining Civil War veterans of Cheshire. All his life had been spent in and around Cheshire, and his was a loved and familiar figure to all in that community.
     In 1866 he was united in marriage to Mary Hawley, and to this union were born seven children, Mrs. Libbie Dickens of Maggie, W. Va., Richard, Oscar, Homer and Mrs. Maggie Nobles of Cheshire and Edna and Mary at home. His wife, and children and eleven grandchildren survive him, also two sisters, Mrs. Martha Swisher and Mrs. Electa Hoffman.
     He served his country during the Civil War as an enlisted soldier from 1861 to '65. It was at this time he received a severe bullet wound, which caused him much trouble ever since. While quite young he joined the Kyger Baptist Church where he retained his membership. In 1916 he and his wife celebrated their golden wedding anniversary, a very happy occasion.
     He had been a sufferer from a complication of diseases all winter, and at the end passed away peacefully as a child. He will live long in the memory of those who knew him, and his erect, martial figure will be sadly missed.

"I cannot say, and I will not say
That he is dead--he is just away!
With a cheery smile and a wave of the hand
He has wandered into an unknown land,
And left us dreaming how very fair
It needs must be since he lingers there.
And you--oh you who the wildest yearn
For the old time step and the glad return--
Think of him faring on as dear
In the love of There as the love of Here:
And loyal still as he gave the blows
Of his warrior strength to his country's foes,
Think of him still as the same I say
He is not dead--he is just away!"

[Note: Has stone; Cemetery McCarty; Unit Co B 91st OVI]

The Gallia Times
March 3, 1919
Transcribed by Irene Hively Blamer


McClain, John

In Memory of James [actually John] McClain
    
John McClain was born in Jackson county, Ohio, Oct. 24, 1842. Here he grew to manhood and in 1861 answered his country's call and served in the 14th and later in 60th Ohio Volunteers.
     In June 1864 he was married to Miss Ann Mary Murray. To them were born six children, four boys and two girls; Chas of Allendale, Mo., one accidentally killed this summer, James of Iowa, Glenn of Nebr. Della of Marshall, Mo., and Delcia of Washington. After twelve years their happy united life was broken when death claimed his companion Sept. 14, 1876.
     He was again married to Mollie Daniels. To this union were born five children; four boys and one girl, Ed and Darl of Minburn, Iowa, Rufus of Des Moines, Otto of Allendale, Mo., and Mrs. Dollie Westfall of Boise, Idaho. His second wife passed away some time ago. After a brief illness of two days he passed away at the home of his son, James, near Mt. Ayr, August 20, 1914.
     The funeral was conducted by the writer at Allendale, Mo., Aug. 22nd after which the body was laid to rest in the Allendale cemetery. He was a member of the G.A.R. and the I.O.O.F. The latter order conducted their beautiful ritualistic service at the grave.
J.B. Cash

[Note: The name of the cemetery in Allendale was Kirk.]

Unknown paper
August 1914
Transcribed by Henny Evans


McClain, William R.

     William McClain married the widow Vesta Willcox Howell about 1858. They had no children together.
He enlisted in Co. I, 173rd Ohio Volunteer Infantry and was transferred into Co. C, 18th Ohio Volunteer
Infantry. He was born about 1842 and more or less disappeared from records after the war.
Vesta died in 1867 and he is not found in a later census or cemetery.

Created obit from Ewing family research of Nancy Hank Ewing and war records
Created by Henny Evans


McClaskey, James

     Three old soldiers passed away the last week...James McClaskey, Geo. Corn [Meigs County] and Benj. Hutchinson, of Vinton, died.

[Note: He served in Co. M, 7th Ohio Volunteer Cavalry and is buried in Pine Grove Cemetery, Morgan Township, April 12, 1832-June 16, 1913. He was the son of Thomas McClaskey and was married to Demarious Carpenter.]

Gallipolis Daily Tribune
June 20, 1913
Transcribed by Henny Evans                                                                          Top of Page


McClaskey, Thomas

     The funeral of Thomas McClaskey, an old and well known resident of No. 11, was held at Salem Saturday afternoon and the interment was in Salem cemetery. Mr. McClaskey, who was 80 years old, died Wednesday, after a weeks' illness of asthma, although he had been failing health for some time. He was a resident of Gallia county before coming to this vicinity and in his younger days, was a farmer. He was a soldier in the Civil War.    
     His wife died just a year ago, but he is survived by one son and four daughters. Thomas, Mayme, Elizabeth and Louie, all at home and Mrs. Charles Scott at Minerton, and by one grandson, Earl Morgan who has always resided with his grandparents. He also leaves three sisters. Mrs. America Gould of this city, Mrs. Sarah Dennie of Roseville, and Miss Hettie McClaskey of Bidwell, one half sister, Mrs. Tafeda Swick of Vanceton and three half brothers. David McClaskey of Hawke, Douglas McClaskey of Marion and William McClaskey of Ironton.--Wellston Telegram.

Gallipolis paper
January 1917
Transcribed by Irene Hively Blamer


McClure, Adam C.

A.C. McClure, Pioneer, Dead at Crown City
Leaves Widow, Children, Grandchildren and Great Grandchildren      A.c. McClure, of Crown City, one of the pioneers of this section of the country, died yesterday, about ten days after a second stroke of paralysis.  A similar attack twelve years ago broke the health of Mr. McClure, a man of seventy-four years, and forced him to retire from active business life.  He was a prosperous general store keeper and farmer.
     In 1861 and 1862 in the early days of the settlement, the late Mr. McClure had a general store in Huntington at the corner which is now Second avenue and Sixth street. For several years and before there was a town this side of the Guyan river he operated the store.
     Later the aged citizen went to Millersport and still later to Crown City. After he had suffered the first paralytic stroke he retired from the merchandise business and bought a large farm close to Crown City where he lived until the time of his death.
     The widow of the late Mr. McClure, whose age is seventy-two years, is in feeble health and is not expected to live long.  The shock of her husband's death was great, and it is feared, may hasten the end.
     Since the attack to Mr. McClure ten days ago, he had not been conscious. Seven sons and daughters were at the bedside at the time of death.
     Wednesday was the fifty-fifth wedding anniversary of Mr. and Mrs. McClure.  However, with both in serious condition, it was impossible to observe the day excepting that a number of persons called and expressed wishes for the recovery of Mr. McClure.
     Besides the sons and daughters twenty grandchildren and three great grandchildren survive, making four generations.
     The names of the near relatives follows: The widow, C.W. McClure and B.C. McClure of Huntington, and Robert McClure of Crown City, sons; Mrs. S.R. Bishop of Huntington, Mrs. Charles Garlic and Mrs. Linus Berry of Crown City, and Mrs. Jesse Snyder of Le Sage, daughters; Charles McClure, Jr. of Huntington, and John McClure of near Columbus, O., brothers.
   The great grandchildren are from five to ten years old.
   The late Mr. McClure was born in Lawrence county, Ohio, the son of a well-to-do farmer.  He was a member of the Methodist church, and the Masonic lodge.  He was an Odd Fellow.  The funeral will be held Saturday morning at ten o'clock at the farm home of the late Mr. McClure.  It is expected to be one of the largest funerals ever held at Crown City.  The late Mr. McClure was well known in Cabell county, and in Lawrence and Gallia counties in Ohio.

[Note: Death records show that his full name was Adam C. and that he is buried in Miller's Cemetery in Lawrence County. Served in Co. A 188th OVI]
Gallipolis Daily Tribune
August 21, 1914
Transcribed by Henny Evans

McConnell, John William

     Another of the boys in blue has crossed the great divide and enlisted in the ranks of that ever increasing army whose commander has never suffered defeat.Mr. John William McConnell died at his home on Chillicothe Ave. Saturday afternoon Dec. 10, 1904, after a long and distressing illness with rheumatism, aged 59 years, 7 months and 24 days. The funeral services were conducted Monday afternoon by Rev. Stinson, interment following at Mound Hill, by Wetherholt.
     Billy, as he was familiarly called, was a member of Co. B, 193rd O. V. I., and was a member of Cadot Post, G. A. R., under whose auspices the burial was conducted. He was a good citizen, honorable and upright and bore the respect of all who knew him. Besides a wife he leaves the following children: Edward, Wilbert, Willis, Walter, Harry and Miss Emma, and three grandchildren. They will have the sincere sympathy of a host of friends who greatly regret the death of this good man.

[Has stone; Born 1844]

Gallipolis Bulletin
December 16, 1904
Transcribed by Irene Hively Blamer                                                                 Top of Page


McCormick, Charles Henry

     Hon. Charles H. McCormick, one of the county's best known men, passed away at his Green Tp. home at 9:30 Tuesday morning, Jan. 2, 1917. While his health had been poor for a good while, his condition due to diabetes did not become critical until about two weeks ago. He would have been 70 years old next April. The news of his death, tho expected, caused a shock and evoked countless expressions of regret and sorrow. For many years he had been active and prominent in various circles. He was born in Green Tp. and had been a farmer, dry goods dealer in this city, a member of the Ohio General Assembly from 1910 to 1914, a farm lecturer, and an active worker in the M. E. Church. He was an enthusiast and an optimist, a student and a worker.
     Mr. McCormick was a Union soldier and served 100 days in the 141st O. V. I. and later in the 193rd O. V. I. He is survived by his widow who was Augusta Halliday, a daughter of the late Laing Halliday, also six children, a brother and a sister, the only two left of the fourteen children of John R. and Sallie R. McCormick. The children are T. Wey and Edwin at home, Laing and Charley of Idaho, Earl in Utah, and Miles in New Orleans. The brother is Ex-Congressman John W. McCormick, now about 85, and the sister Mrs. Irene Miles of Johnstown, Ohio.
     None of the children living in the West will be able to attend the funeral which will be held at Mt. Zion at 1 o'clock today. Rev. C. W. Brady will officiate. Burial by Wetherholt. The pall bearers will be J. E. Halliday, W. B. McCormick, J. R. McCormick and Ira Mills. Members of the local G. A. R. Post will attend.

[Note: Has stone; Mound Hill Cemetery; Born April 13]

Gallipolis Journal
January 11, 1917

McCormick, Charles Henry

     Last Thursday afternoon all that was mortal of Hon. Charles W. McCormick was laid to rest after impressive and touching funeral services conducted by Revs. E. L. Morrell of Rodney and C. W. Brady, an intimate friend of the deceased, at Mt. Zion church in Green township. Mr. McCormick passed away on Tuesday morning, Jan. 2, 1917. The church was filled to overflowing with sympathetic friends and neighbors.
     The news of Mr. McCormick's death was received with universal regret in all parts of the county. Few of our citizens enjoyed such wide acquaintanceship and high personal respect as he. His life time had been spent in gracious deeds and kindly acts, and the good seed he had sown along life's pathway blossomed as the rose to ease his footsteps down the western slope of life and brighten his last hours on earth.
     Mr. McCormick was a pillar of strength in every movement that was good. As a citizen, statesman and soldier his record was unblemished. He leaves behind him the priceless heritage of a good name, and his good works will follow long after him. The following obituary, read at his funeral, all too briefly outlines the scope of his activities during his lifetime:
     Charles Henry McCormick, son of John Rogers and Sarah Ross Waddell McCormick, was born at his late residence in Green Township, Gallia County, Ohio, April 13, 1847, and passed peacefully away Jan. 2, 1917, aged 69 years, 8 months and 19 days.
     On Feb. 22, 1870, he was happily united in marriage with Emma Augusta Halliday in Gallipolis. To them were born seven children, one daughter and six sons, the daughter, Osa, dying at the tender age of four years. The sons survive. Most of his life was spent on the farm and in Gallipolis.
     He was promoter of and worker in farmers' institutes in the county, and finally was appointed lecturer of institutes by the state board of agriculture. At the time of his death he was a member of the Centenary Grange. He had much to do with the organization of the lodge of K. of P.'s in Gallipolis. He was also a member of the I. O. O. F., the Red Men, Sons of Temperance, and G. A. R. He was quite active in these orders, filling the chairs in the K. of P.'s and Odd Fellows lodges. When he moved to the farm he felt that he was disconnected from the lodges, and in a friendly manner while in good standing, withdrew from them.
     Mr. McCormick was at one time president of the Gallipolis District Epworth League, and also president of the Gallia County Sunday School Association. He was chairman of the Relief Committee and distributor of its funds during the flood of 1884. He was a member of the school board of Gallipolis for a number of years, which was one of the pleasant recollections of his later life. He was a member of the General Assembly of Ohio from 1910 to 1914.
     He enlisted in the 141st Regiment of the National Guards May 1, 1864 at the age of 17 and served the full time, being discharged at Gallipolis in September, ??? after which he enlisted and was mustered in as Sergeant of Co. B. 193rd Ohio Volunteer Infantry. His regiment was immediately sent to the Shenandoah Valley under General Hancock, serving until the close of the Civil War, and was mustered out at Winchester, Va., and discharged at Camp Chase August 14, 1865.
     Mr. McCormick began his business career as clerk for Halliday & Miles wholesale store at an early age and was promoted from time to time until he became buyer for the firm. He later went into business for himself and finally moved to the farm where he enjoyed that kind of life and work. He studied farm life and familarized himself with all modern methods and principles of farming, horticulture and trucking being especially attractive to him. He was a prodigious reader of ? farm papers and ??. Few men in the ordinary ? of life were better in ? than he. He ???.
     He was converted ? ? the year 1872 in a revival ? held in Gallipolis by the Rev. ? and joined the M. E. church and was an active member of that church until death, holding many offices in church and Sunday School during that period. He was industrious, accomodating and generous to a fault. He was human and had his shortcomings, but was full of noble deeds and was always a public servant. He was hospitable in his home and enjoyed having company. He had been in failing health for a number of years, and about three months ago his health gave completely away and he kept declining until he was mustered out of every activity of this life and mustered into the endless life beyond.

[Note: Has stone; Mound Hill Cemetery; Born April 13, 1847]

The Gallia Times
January 10, 1917
Transcriptions by Irene Hively Blamer                                                              Top of Page


McCormick, J. Harvey

Death of Mr. J.H. McCormick

     Mr. J. Harvey McCormick died at the home of his daughter, Mrs. E.G. Waddell of 626 Third Avenue (this) Friday, Sept. 5, 1924, after a two weeks illness at the age of 82 years.
     Mr. McCormick was a Civil War veteran and had always lived near Rodney until the death of his wife a year ago. Since then he had lived with his son Charley in Green township, coming here for a visit Aug. 21.
     He leaves the following children: Mrs. Myrtie Waddell and Ed McCormick of this city, Frank and Burt of Athens, Mrs. Ora Fox of Rodney, Charles of Blazer and Clyde of Johnstown, Pa.
     Burial will be in charge of Geo. Wetherholt and Sons at Mound Hill but time of funeral will be given Saturday.

[Note: He served in Co. F, 2nd Ohio Heavy Artillery.]

Gallipolis Daily Tribune
September 5, 1924
Transcribed by Henny Evans

McCormick, J. Harvey

Funeral of J. H. McCormick
     The funeral services of Mr. J. Harvey McCormick will be conducted by Rev. C. W. Brady Monday at 10:30 a. m. at the home of his daughter Mrs. Waddell on Third Avenue with burial at Mound Hill.

Gallipolis Daily Tribune
Saturday September 6, 1924
Transcribed by Suzanne H. Giroux


McCormick, John Watts

John W. McCormick Dead
Venerable and Honored Son of Gallia Passes
     The surrounding community was greatly shocked and grieved to learn of the death of John Watts McCormick who passed away at his home at Fairfield at about 5 p.m. Monday afternoon, June 25, 1917, following an attack of heart trouble.
     The deceased was born in the McCormick settlement and was one of a family of 12 children. He was first married to Miss Caroline Mills and to them were born the following surviving children: Mrs. Truman Cole of Lisbon, N. Dakota; William at Teoola, Utah; and Wayland at Alexander, O. after the death of his first wife he married Miss sally Miles, and to this union was born one daughter, Miss Sally, who resides at the home place. His sister, Mrs. Irene Miles of Columbus, is the last one of the original family surviving.
     The funeral will probably be held Friday morning but final arrangements will not be made until the arrival of his children.
     John Watts McCormick was born in Green township, Gallia county, Dec. 20, 1831—the son of John Rodgers McCormick and Sarah Waddell McCormick. He was a man of deep religious convictions and prominent in the Methodist Episcopal Church, to which he sustained for many years the relation of a local minister. He was dearly loved in his church.
     In politics Mr. McCormick was a Republican, and served one term in congress with honor in the early 80’s. He was a farmer by occupation, and successful. In all the varied relations of life, Mr. McCormick was a true, loyal, upright man, whose character was unsullied and whose life won for him the entire confidence of all thrown into association with him.

[Note: Buried in Mt. Zion Cemetery in Green Township. Squirrel Hunter in Civil War.]]

Gallia Times
Friday, June 29, 1917
Transcribed by Sheri Culler


McCoy, A. M.

     A. M. McCoy died at his home in Middleport at 11 o'clock Monday morning in his 67th year after a brief illness with paralysis. Mr. McCoy was a resident of Gallipolis for 20 years, going from here to Middleport 4 years ago. He was a veteran of the 36th O. V. I. in the Union Army, was a member of the G. A. R. and of the M. E. Church.
     Besides his wife, he is survived by the following children P. F. McCoy, Mrs. George Wyatt, Glouster, Mrs. Charles Kercher, Athens, Mrs. C. B. Forrest, Middleport, Miss Vesta McCoy of this city, and Misses Nora and Garnette at home.
      The funeral will be held at Middleport this morning at 11 o'clock by Rev. Mr. Thomas and the body will be brought here immediately after the services and interred at Pine Street cemetery.

[Note: Has stone; Born 1843; Died 1910; Unit Co C 36th OVI]

Gallipolis Journal
May 18, 1910
Transcribed by Irene Hively Blamer                                                                  Top of Page


McCumber, Jonathan Reed

     Jonathan was born in Gallia County about December 1844 to William and Mary Ann Ewing McCumber. He moved with the family to Illinois, and his residence was given as Pilot Grove, Hancock County, Illinois when he enlisted as an unassigned recruit in the 118th Illinois Volunteer Infantry. No further information has been found about him.

Created obit from Ewing family research of Nancy Hank Ewing and war records
Created by Henny Evans


McCumber, William Henry Harrison

     William was born in Ohio in October 1819 and in 1843 he married Mary Ann Ewing in Gallia County. In 1846 they moved to Fulton County, Illinois and then on to Hancock County. William was a blacksmith by trade. By 1862 they had moved to Keokuk, Iowa where 42 year old William enlisted in Co. C, 17th Iowa Volunteer Infantry. He re-enlisted in 1864 and was made Second Corporal. He served until July 1865.
     William and Mary Ann had seven children. She died in 1874 and he married the widow Angeline Baccus Ewing. They had one daughter Verdi and Angeline had six children by her first marriage.
By 1890 they lived in Ozark County, Missouri. William died August 8, 1907.

Created obit from Ewing family research of Nancy Hank Ewing and war records
August 1907
Created by Henny Evans


McDaniel, Gehiel Gregory

Death of Mr. McDaniel
     The venerable father of Sheriff W.L. McDaniel, Mr. Gehiel Gregory McDaniel passed over into eternal rest at 6:30 p.m. Friday evening, June 5th, 1903, aged 79 the 3d of last month. He had been in feeble health from old age and a complication of troubles for a long time and of late has been declining. His wife Mrs. Susan McCartney McDaniel, and to whom he was united in marriage 56 years ago survives him, but is so feeble that her death would not be unexpected at any time. She and husband have been staying with their son Will for sometime where they could receive the loving kindness of himself and family and where no attention to their every want, however small, has ever been neglected, but which has been given with that pleasure that ever smoothes the paths of old people to the tomb and as it is ever hoped to a better world.
     The funeral services will be conducted at their old home at McDaniel Sunday at the Sand Fork Baptist Church at 11 a.m., by Rev. F.E. Brininstool of this city. The remains were embalmed and prepared for burial here by Wetherholt, but the burial will be conducted by the Wiseman Bros. at their old home at McDaniel.
     Mr. McDaniel was the father of six children, two only surviving Will and Mrs. Jane M. Davisson widow of the Jesse Davisson of Cadmus. He is also survived by one sister Mrs. Elsie Jane Eakins, of Ironton, mother of Dr. Jehu Eakins of this city, and who is also in feeble health.
     Mr. McDaniel belonged to no orders, but lived in the common acceptation of the term, the quiet, uneventful life of a plain farmer, sustaining kindly relations with all of his neighbors, attending strictly to his own affairs, living religiously, maintaining the family Altar as a member of the church in his household from marriage, and passing down to the tomb with no regrets and respected by all who had ever known him. May peace be with him evermore.

[Note: He served as a Squirrel Hunter. He is buried in Sandfork Cemetery.]

Gallipolis Daily Tribune
June 6, 1905
Transcribed by Henny Evans


McDaniel, Marion

     Marion McDaniel was born Sept. 18, 1834, and died at the home of his son, Albert McDaniel, June 27, 1914, aged 79 years, 9 months and 9 days. He was a son of Ephrian [sic] and Elizabeth McDaniel, and one of a family of fourteen children all of whom have preceded him excepting the youngest brother and youngest sister.
     Mr. McDaniel was united in marriage with Phoebe Elizabeth Bird on Jan. 1, 1862. To them were born eight children, five boys and three girls, five of whom are living and three have passed away,Joe, dying in childhood, Anna, wife of Eugene Smith, and Minnie, wife of Charles Williams. The ones living are John William of Meridian, Cal., George of Colorado City, Mrs. Mary Guthrie of Rio Grande, Albert of Ashland, Ky., and Marion Ross of Oak Park, Ill. The wife and mother passed away on June 6, 1900.
     Mr. McDaniel lived a very active and industrious life, and was always engaged in something that required ability, forethought and systematic planning, and whatever he had in hand he gave it his best efforts. He was quite successful in business because of his honesty and uprightness in all his dealings. His word was his bond and when once given he never faltered. He was a good neighbor, helpful and sympathetic. He was converted in early manhood, afterward uniting with the Sandfork Baptist Church and continued a faithful member until his death. He loved the church and always gave cheerfully of his services and means. He loved to mingle with christian people and took an active part in church work. He maintained a christian home, and never omitted giving thanks and praise to Him who said, "Be thou faithful until death, and I will give thee a crown of life."

[Note: He served as a Squirrel Hunter.]

Gallia Times
July 23, 1914
Transcribed by Henny Evans


McDaniel, W.H.H.

Death Called
Mr. W.H.H. McDaniel at His Home in This City Thursday Last
     Mr. W.H.H. McDaniel, 82, died at the home of Charles Morgan on First avenue in this city Thurdsay morning, Nov. 23, 1922, after a week's illness from heart and stomach trouble.
     Mr. McDaniel was a native of this county, born at Cadmus, where he resided until the last few years. In 1869 he married Miss Arminta Copeland. To them were born four children, three of whom survive. They are Fred S. of Bridgeport, Conn., Miss Gertrude of Gallipolis, and Clarence of New York. One brother, Mr. J.L. McDaniel of this city, survives him. Mrs. McDaniel, his wife, died August 2, 1892.
     Mr. McDaniel was a faithful member of the Sandfork Baptist Church, and was a trustee of that church at the time of his death. Brief funeral services were held Friday at the Morgan home, after which services were held at Cadmus at 2:30, interment following there.

[Note: According to the Squirrel Hunter Roster, W.H.H. McDaniel was a member. He is buried at Sandfork Cemetery in Walnut Township and was born March 3, 1840.]

Gallia Times
November 30, 1922
Transcribed by Henny Evans


McDonald, Franklin

Taps Sounded
For Franklin McDonald, an Old Soldier of Walnut Tp.
     GALLIA, May 2--This community was shocked over the sudden and unexpected death of Frank McDonald Saturday morning, April 30. Mr. McDonald was as well as usual until a few hours previous to his death. He performed some work on Friday and ate a hearty supper that evening and died before daylight Saturday morning from heart failure.
     Mr. McDonald lived in the western part of Walnut Township on Symmes Creek and was well known in this community as an excellent citizen. He leaves a wife and four children.
     Mr. McDonald was a soldier in the Civil War and was 71 years of age. He was a member of the Gallia Baptist Church for 20 years and the whole community mourns the loss of a good citizen.
     The funeral took place Sunday evening at the Gallia Baptist Church with probably the largest assemblage ever gathered there on a funeral occasion. The funeral was preached by Rev. Yelton and the burial conducted by Undertaker Phillips, successor to the Wiseman Bros. of Waterloo.

[Note: Franklin McDonald was born in 1838, served in Unit Co. F, 27th, O. V. I., and his stone is located in Gallia Baptist Cemetery.]

Gallipolis Journal
Wednesday, May 4, 1910
Transcribed by Karen Strojin                                                                          Top of Page


McElhinny, Samuel O.

Samuel McElhinny to be Buried Here
    Samuel O. McElhinny, 77, father of Mrs. C.R. Deardorff, 851 King Ave., died from senility Tuesday at the National Soldiers Home at Hampton, Va., where he has been making his home for several years. During the civil war he was decorated for bravery and capturing a rebel flag.
     Mrs. Margaret McElhinny, his wife, was killed last October when run over by a grocery truck in King Ave. Another daughter, Mrs. Maggie Watkins of Dresden and two sons, Edward of Columbus and Fred of Delaware also survive.
     He was a charter member of Gallipolis Lodge of Knights of Pythias and a member of King Ave. M.E. Church. Funeral services will be held here Friday in charge of the Knights of Pythias and the G.A.R.

[Note: Buried in Pine Street Cemetery. Website of Medal of Honor winners shows he was awarded the Congressional Medal of Honor on May 3, 1865 for capturing a rebel flag on April 6, 1865 at Deatonsville, also known as Sailor's Creek, Virginia.; Co A, 2nd WV Cavalry. King Ave M.E. is in Columbus.]

Gallipolis Daily Tribune
May 17, 1923
Transcribed by Henny Evans


McGath, Robert

     Mr. Robert McGath, a well known resident of Northup, this county, and a veteran of the Civil War, passed away Friday night, Sept. 7, after brief illness. The funeral services were held at Asbury Church in Green township Monday afternoon by Dr. J. M. Davis of Rio Grande, the interment following at Centenary.
     Mr. McGath is survived by his wife, two brothers, John McGath of this city, and Henry McGath of Georgia, and ten sons and daughters, Mrs. Lee Rader, Miss Alice McGath, Mrs. Homer Dickey, Mrs. Claude Bramfield, John McGath, Miss Jane McGath, and Miss Sadie McGath, all of Columbus. Clint McGath of Newark, and Miss Frankie and Morris McGath at home.

[Note: Has stone]

The Gallia Times                                                                                           Top of Page


McGath, William

     William McGath, 85, a former resident of Harrison Tp., died aSturday [sic] at the home of his niece and nearest relative, Mrs. J. C. Bickle, 1227 Lockbourne Road, Columbus. He was a Civil War veteran. The body was shipped here Tuesday and the funeral was held that afternoon at Centenary. Burial by Wetherholt & Entsminger.

[Note: Has stone; Born 1833; Died May 1919; Unit Co M 7th OVC]

Gallipolis Bulletin
May 8, 1919
Transcribed by Irene Hively Blamer


McGhee, James A.

James McGhee Dead

     James A. McGhee, son of Andrew Jackson and Rebecca McGhee, was born June 19, 1844, and died March 7, 1922, aged 77 years, 8 months and 25 days. He was the second son of a family of 8 children, five of whom have preceeded him in death. Two died in childhood, the others, Mrs. Kathleen Dowler, Mrs. Margaret Patton and Geo. W. McGhee, have preceded him only a few years. The remaining members of this family are Frank and Jefferson McGhee, both of Vinton.
     Mr. McGhee was united in marriage to Permelia Grady, and to this union seven children were born, all of whom, with their mother, survive, except one daughter, Demma, who died young. The McGhee family always lived at Vinton until a few years ago when they moved to Rutland.
     At the beginning of the Civil War, Mr. McGhee,his brother George, and also their father, all enlisted for the cause of liberty. James, being quite young, first served as a wagon master, a member of the 60th O.V.I. His company was captured at Harper's Ferry and they were paroled. He re-enlisted and served until honorably discharged.
     During the time of the Salvation Army services at Vinton he became converted and was never known to waver or falter in his faith. When the army disbandedhere he became a member of the M.E. Church.
Besides his two brothers, Frank and Jefferson, he leaves his aged widow, a daughter, Mrs. Alvira Spires of Rutland, and five sons, Dalton of Kentucky, Joseph of Columbus and Walter of Union Furnace, besides many grandchildren, nephews and nieces and a wide circle of friends to mourn their loss.
     The funeral was held at the Vinton M.E. Church Thursday morning by Rev. McCoy, burial in the McGhee cemetery. The funeral was in charge of the K. of P. order of which he was an honored member.
     Beside the wife and children who came here from Rutland with the remains of their father were Jacob Guinther of Haydenville, Mr. and Mrs. Walter McGhee and two daughters, Ruth and husband, and Helen McGhee and Isaac Dyer of Union Furnace and Mr. and Mrs. Jos. McGhee of Columbus. They were entertained at the home of Mr. and Mrs. Jeff McGhee, Edw. McGhee, Elza McGhee and E.E. Edmiston.

Gallia Times
March 16, 1922
Transcribed by Henny Evans                                                                          Top of Page


McGowan, Daniel

G.A.R. Ranks Made One Smaller by the Death of David McGowan
     David McGowan, aged 64, died at the home of his son, in Nail Mill addition last Friday, tuberculosis
being the cause. His illness was long and tedious, but he bore it patiently.
     The deceased enlisted in the Civil War in Co. B 22nd Kentucky Infantry Nov. 9 1861, and continued in
active service until he was mustered out Jan. 20, 1865. His army life was one of great endurance and gallant
service. Since the war he has lived near Oak Hill and Samsonville. He came to Jackson to live with his son
almost a year ago. The funeral was held Sunday at the U.B. Church, Rev. Orr, officiating. Interment at Fairmount.

[Note: Most records show him as Daniel and perhaps he was Daniel David. Fairmount Cemetery is in Lick Township, Jackson County, Ohio. Friday would have been January 17.]

Jackson Standard
January 20, 1908
Transcribed by Henny Evans


McKean, William

Death of Mr. McKean
     Wm. McKean, a civil war veteran, died at Rio Grande Saturday and was buried at Old Pine cemetery Monday by Undertaker Davis, of Thurman. He was 77 years old and had been very feeble for a long time. He is survived by wife and several children.

[Note: He served in Co. F, 33rd Ohio Volunteer Infantry. Aug. 17, 1836-Aug. 9, 1913.]

Gallipolis Daily Tribune
August 13, 1913
Transcribed by Henny Evans


McLeish, William

     Wm. McLeish, son of Duncan and Annie Gow McLeish, was born in Scotland on June 3, 1841, and departed this life on Jan. 28, 1918, aged 76 years, 7 months and 25 days.
     He was united in marriage to Sarah A. Shaffer in 1867, and to this union were born four children, three daughters and a son, Mrs. Ida Viars and Mrs. Lizzie McCall of Grove City, Mrs. Addie Viars of Gahanna and John of White Oak.
     Besides his wife and children he leaves to mourn their loss six grandchildren, a brother John of Hamden and three sisters, Mrs. Margaret McGhee of Hamden, Mrs. Belle Woodruff of Alice, Mrs. Jennie Woodruff of Dayton and one half-sister, Mrs. Mary Ewing of Allendale, Mo.
     He was a soldier in the Civil War and served his country faithfully. He united with the Campaign F. W. B. Church in 1894, and remained a faithful member until death.
     The funeral was held at Bidwell church on Thursday, Jan. 28, conducted by Rev. W. J. Fulton of Rio Grande, burial in the Robinson cemetery by undertaker Glassburn. The pall bearers were Samuel Rife, J. V. Fulton, Perry Thaxton, A. L. Rife, Harlen Fulton and W. C. Shaver.

[Note: Stone is in Vinton Memorial in Huntington Township (not Robinson); Unit Co L 12th OVC & Co K 60th OVI]

The Gallia Times
February 6, 1918
Transcribed by Irene Hively Blamer                                                                 Top of Page


McMillen, Andrew L.

     Andrew L. McMillen, son of William and Nancy Butler McMillen was born in Gallia County, Ohio, March 8, 1840. At the age of eight years he came with his parents to this county, which, for more than three score years and ten was his home. August 19, 1860 he was united in marriage to Letitia Wiseman. The covenant into which he entered on that beautiful summer day of the long ago, when life was sweet and full of promise, “To have and to hold, to love and to cherish – till death do us part, I plight thee my troth” was faithfully kept by him. To this union were born six children, three of whom survive him: Mrs. A. I. Eubanks and Peter of this city and Herbert M. or Corning, Ohio.
     Early in the strife between the North and the South, prompted by the spirit of loyalty to his country and his flag, he enlisted in Co. H. Second Virginia Cavalry, and faithfully and bravely fought her battles till the spirit of peace once more hovered over our fair land, “Twas then when but a small lad that Andrew McMillin entered my life. He was to my childish years the ideal man. Clad in the uniform that marked the soldier of the North, his sword suspended from his side, his spurs jingling as he walked, with an erect figure due to military discipline, he was to me the personification of ideal young manhood. And during all the long years from then till now, never did I have occasion to change my ideas of Andrew McMillin as a man.
     Six sons of William and Nancy McMillin, Milton, Harvey, Emerson, Murray and Marion and the subject of this sketch fought beneath the Stars and Stripes. Marion was killed in battle and Milton and Harvey died in later years, as the result of wounds received in battle. The voice of Cornelia was speaking for the countless mothers of the land, “These are my jewels: Take them. Bring them home to me again, but take them” a truly remarkable gift for one mother. But the victories of peace not less glorious than the triumphs of strife. At the close of the war, Mr. McMillan returned to Latrobe Furnace this county. This furnace was owned and operated by H. S. Bundy, in those days a prominent man in the affairs both of county and state.
For the last score of years Mr. McMillen made this city his home and here he died Monday, July 10, 1922. For months he had been in failing health. He lacked nothing that loving hands could do for his comfort. No work of complaint escaped him for he believed that when the Lord permitted sickness, sickness was his portion to be endured patiently and submissively.
     Silently he wrapped the drapery of his couch about him and lay down to sleep, fully trusting Him who said “Come unto me all ye that are weary and heavy laden and I will give you rest.” How appropriate that his funeral services should be held in this church, the church of his choice, the church to which he and his wife belonged. Thus briefly told, is the life story of this good man, whom this beautiful summer morning we tenderly and lovingly consign to the earth, the common mother of us all.

     Card of Thanks – We wish to express our sincere thanks to all those who, in anyway assisted us during our hour of grief. Especially do we wish to express our appreciation to L. H. Powell for his thoughtfulness, M. R. White of his words of comfort, the choir for their services and all those who contributed floral offerings.
     Very gratefully,
     The McMillin Family

[Note: This unit was actually the 2nd West Virginia Cavalry. He is buried in Fairmount Cemetery in Jackson County, Ohio.]

Standard-Journal, Jackson, Ohio
July 26, 1922
Transcribed by Donna Scurlock


McMillin, Edward Tiffin

     Edward was born August 19, 1836. He joined the Trumbull Guards in 1862 and while at home on furlough in 1863 he married Sarah Caroline Knopp in Gallia County. Sarah died in 1921. In 1923 Edward went to live with his son Samuel in Akron, Ohio and he died there September 24, 1923. He is buried at Gravel Hill Cemetery in Cheshire Township. They had three children, Laura Lambert, Peter and Samuel.

Created obit from Ewing family research of Nancy Hank Ewing and war records
September 1923
Created by Henny Evans


McMillin, Emerson

A Noted Financier
Distinguished Son of Ohio is Native of Ewington
     Ohio has a way of giving a noted financier to the nation about every generation, and the most
noted of those now living is Emerson McMillin, formerly of Ironton, later a distinguished citizen of Columbus, and now a resident in New York City.
     He was born in Ewington, O., in 1844, so that he has just reached the three score and ten age.
Ewington is a little village on Raccoon creek in the northern edge of Gallia county. It is credited in the census with 130 people now (1914), and it has [sic] just about that many when this distinguished man was born there. His parents were without means and it was up to him to make his own way as soon as he was old enough to earn anything. He attended the public schools of the place until he was 12 years old, making good use of them, and then he took employment at a furnace, taking charge of an engine.
     When the Civil War broke out, he enlisted in the Union army and served four years and four
months--first as a member of the 18th O.V.I., and later with the 2nd W.Va. Cavalry. After the war he was employed for a little while in the mercantile business and then took employment with a company that was engaged in constructing a gas plant...became its manager and here began his life career, for he has been largely interested in gas properties ever since.
     In 1875 he became for a time interested also in iron manufacturing and coal mining, which were but a step from the gas business at that time. In 1883 he came to Columbus, where he remained 13 years, as the head of the old Columbia Gas Co. He took a prominent part in all that had to do with the material interests of the city and was one of the first presidents of the board of trade--now the chamber of commerce. In 1889, with New York associates, he consolidated the several St. Louis gas properties and conducted the consolidated company for several years. At this time he began dealing in gas stocks and established the banking and brokerage house of Emerson McMillin & Co., in New York, which now engages most of his attention. He has made many public gifts in Ohio, a notable one being the Emerson McMillin Astronomical observatory on the campus of the state university--all the expense of the equipment of which he bore. Columbus Dispatch

[Note: From other sources: "Emerson McMillin died at his home, “Darlington,” Mahwah, New Jersey, May 31, 1922. He is buried in the McMillin Catacomb #6 in Woodlawn Cemetery, lot #11341, Plot: Park View, Section 137, New York City, New York. In religion, he was a Congregationalist for his whole life." He married Isabel Morgan and they had Emerson, Marion, Stella, Mary and Lena. He received five wounds during the war and he and his five brothers all enlisted and were referred to as the "Fighting McMillins." Only three of them returned home. He was a devoted student in many aspects of life learning about everything from gas to art to foreign countries. He reported sleeping five and one-half hours every night in order to allow time for study. He helped educate many young men and women and gave generously and often anonymously gifts of money.]

Gallia Times
December 23, 1914
Died May 31, 1922
Transcribed by Henny Evans


McMillin, L.

     Funeral Sermon of L. McMillin, a veteran soldier of Company B, 36th Regiment O. V. I., who was killed at Strausburgh, VA. on the 15th of August, 1864, will be preached at Vinton, by the Rev. Mr. Breare, on the 4th Sunday, being the 30th day of October 1864.

[Note: No stone]

Gallipolis Journal
October 21, 1864
Transcribed by Irene Hively Blamer                                                                 Top of Page


McMillin, Samuel

Dropped Dead.
     Mr. Samuel McMillin, of Vinton, dropped dead Wednesday just after dinner, it is supposed from heart disease. He was a man of 60 years of age and leaves a daughter Mrs. William Jackson, of Vinton with whom he lived, and three sons, fine young men engaged in business in the furnance regions. His wife died many years ago. He unfortunately killed her himself. He was going out to shoot a bird, when the gun went off accidently, the load taking effect behind her ear and killing her instantly. His mother was sister to Anselm and Edward Holcomb, and he leaves a brother, Edward McMillen, of Cheshire, and two sisters, Mrs. George Brown, of Cheshire, and Mrs. Jonas Macomber, of Vinton. He was a good citizen, an ex-soldier of the Union and a member of Corwin Post of Vinton.

Gallipolis Daily Tribune
Volume IX
Number 107
May 5, 1898
Gallipolis, Ohio

Transcribed By: MLT
                                                                       

McMillin, Samuel R.

     Samuel R. McMillin, an old soldier of the 55th O.V.I., died Wednesday at his home in Vinton within forty-five minutes after eating a hearty dinner. He appeared as well as usual up to a few minutes of his death when he complained of a pain in the region of his heart, after eating, which proved fatal. He was sixty-eight years old this month and always appeared well and hearty. He is survived by five children: Ansel and Monson, located at Buffalo, N. Y., Edward and Frank, of Lancaster, and Mrs. W. J. Jackson, of Vinton, with whom he has made his home for several years. His sudden death was a great shock to all. His funeral was Friday afternoon at 1 o'clock under the auspices of the G. A. R., of which body he was a member.

[Note: Has stone; Old Holcomb Cemetery; Born: April 10, 1830; Died: May 4, 1898; Co G 195th OVI S&S]

Gallipolis Journal
May 10, 1898
Transcribed by Irene Hively Blamer                                                               Top of Page


McMillin, Stewart

     Stewart was born about 1846 in Vinton, Gallia County. He enlisted in the Trumbull Guards in 1863 and served through July 1865. He farmed after the war and about 1867 he moved to Hancock County, Illinois where in 1871 he joined the regular army. He left in 1874 due to disability which began with a fall over a cliff and a severely damaged ankle.
     He married Mary E., also known as Adaline, in 1874 and they had two sons, Edward and Willard. Heswitched from farmer to teamster. He died July 30, 1884 in Hancock County, Illinois.

Created obit from Ewing family research of Nancy Hank Ewing and war records
July 1884
Created by Henny Evans


McMullin, Charles

Death Of Charles McMullin
     Mr. Charles McMullin, a citizen of Vinton, this County, went to his barn this morning about 7 o'clock to milk his cow, and that was the last that was seen of him until discovered by Mr. Thomas Callahn dead. The barn is on Mr. Callahan's lot and he happened to find him shortly after his death and while his body was yet warm. Mr Mc Mullin had had heart trouble ever since the war, it being the result of a wound recieved in the Army. And for which he drew a pension of $8 per month, and it was from this that his death came. He leaves a wife and four children to mourn the loss of a kind, industrious husband and father. Some eight years ago Mr. McMullin was terribly crippled by being knocked off the railroad trestle near Glenn's Summit, and the R. R. Company, compromised with him by giving him the water tank to attend to, and that had been his business. He was about fifty years old and was respected and well liked. His burial will be by Undertaker W. F. Butler, Thursday, at one o'clock, under the auspices of Corwin Post, G. A. R., of that place, of which he was a worth while member.

Gallipolis Daily Tribune
Volume III
Number 22
March 26, 1895
Gallipolis, Ohio

Transcribed By: MLT


McMullen, Charles

     Charles McMullen, an ex-soldier and member of Corwin Post, dropped dead Tuesday morning at his home in Vinton, from heart disease. He will be buried Thursday, March 20, at 1 o'clock p. m. at Vinton, under the auspices of the G. A. R. and W. R. C. of that place.

[Note: Buried in Old Holcomb in Huntington Township. Other members of this family spelled the name McMillin.]

Gallipolis Journal
March 27, 1895
Transcribed by Irene Hively Blamer                                                                  Top of Page


McNeal, Thomas

     Thomas McNeal, son of Jonathan and Ann McNeal, born Dec. 17, 1845, and died Dec. 16, 1920, being within one day of seventy-five years of age. On Oct. 28, 1869, he was united in marriage to Mary Manring, who died March 3, 1897. He was one of ten children, all of whom have preceded him to the Great Beyond excepting one sister and one brother.
     When Lincoln called for boys to defend our union, Tom, then being only seventeen years of age, was one of the first to enlist in the First Ohio Heavy Artillery, where he served with honor and credit.
     He was a good kind man and neighbor, ready at all times to do his part and help the needy. He leaves to mourn their loss, one sister, Mrs. Mary Cheatwood, Gallia, Ohio, and one brother, Abraham McNeal of Waverley, Ohio, many nephews and nieces and a host of neighbors and friends.

[Note: no stone]

The Gallia Times
January 6, 1921
Transcribed by Irene Hively Blamer


McQuaid, Perry O.C.

Death of Mr. McQuaid
     Mr. Perry O.C. McQuaid of Pine street, this city, died Thursday August 27, 1908, of paralysis that struck him Sunday Aug. 16. Mr. McQuaid was a brick moulder 68 years old Christmas day. He was born in Gallipolis and was the son of Benjamin and Beersheba McQuaid. He was united in marriage May 15, 1869, to Miss Nancy J. Walters, and they became the parents of five children, the surviving ones being Daniel, James and Mrs. James Baldwin all of this city.
     He had been a member of the Christian Church and was a peaceable inoffensive citizen well liked and industrious and devoted to his family. His funeral services will be at his late home Saturday afternoon at 3:30 by Rev. T.F. Carey, the interment following at Pine street Cemetery by Wetherholt.

[Note: He has a Grave Registration Card for Civil War service with no further information.]

Gallipolis Daily Tribune
August 28, 1908
Transcribed by Henny Evans


McQuiston, William

     William McQuisten, aged 24 years, enlisted from Morgan township Aug. 1864, died at home on 15th July, 1865, from Chronic diarrhea. Unmarried. He was in Co. J, 173rd OVI.

[Note: The above is taken from a list of those who died in the war. He was discharged June 26, 1865. He is buried in Clark Chapel Cemetery in Morgan Township.]

The Gallipolis Journal
August 24, 1865
Transcribed by Eva Swain Hughes


Mears, John

     John Mears, private in 18th Ohio Battery, died at Chattanooga June 3d, 1865—unmarried.

[Note: His name was found in a list of soldiers who died in the war. He is buried in Chattanooga National Cemetery. One source said he died June 10, 1865.]

Gallipolis Journal
November 9, 1865
Transcribed by Eva Swain Hughes


Menager, Peter

Peter Menager Dead
     Peter Menager, for many years a resident of Crown City, died at his home in Huntington, November 24 following a long illness. He was eighty-four years of age and a veteran of the Civil War, having served his country throughout the struggle. He belonged to the Ninety-first Ohio regiment. He was a relative of the Menager families who formerly resided in Gallipolis and was an eccentric character. He leaves his companion, Mrs. Lucinda Menager, and a son, Gerard Menager of Huntington.
     Funeral services were conducted at the Good Hope church in Guyan township Sunday evening, burial following in the church cemetery in charge of Undertaker Kincaid. Rev. J.W. Greer of Proctorville, Uncle Peter's comrade in arms, pronounced the funeral rites.

[Note: There is no stone for Peter in Good Hope but according to the census he was born about 1847/48. Co. I, 45th KYI (Kentucky Infantry). There was no record found for him in the 91st OVI.]

Gallia Times
December 7, 1922
Transcribed by Henny Evans


Might, William Jasper

     William Jasper Might died at his home in Vinton Thursday of last week of tuberculosis. He was twice married, first to Polly Ann Shepard, who died in 1895 and in March, 1896, he married Mrs. Martha Hartsook, widow of the late Rev. William J. Hartsook, who survives him. Mr. Might is a step-father of Editor J. W. Hartsook of the Vinton Leader.
     He was a veteran of the Civil war and a member of Corwin Post at Vinton, and was also a charter member of the Vinton lodge, Knights of Pythias. He was a fine old gentleman and had many friends. The funeral was held last Saturday at Mt. Tabor by Rev. W. J. Fulton, interment by undertaker Butler.

[Note: No stone. Born September 1845; Died September 12, 1907; Death Record Vol. II; Unit Co D 91st OVI; Family stone]

Gallipolis Bulletin
September 20, 1907
Transcribed by Irene Hively Blamer                                                                 Top of Page


Miles, John Wesley

J.W. Miles Passes to Better World
The End Came Peacefully after Long Decline in Strength
     Mr. J.W. Miles died this Wednesday morning, Dec. 22, 1915, at 12:30, after a gradual decline in vigor extending over several years, at the close of the second month of his 72d year. He had shown unusual weakness since Saturday, but was able to walk on the sidewalk in front of his house yesterday morning. But after his exercise he was so exhausted he told his son Harvey he was not going to be here much longer.
At 12 o'clock last night he awakened Mrs. Miles and said: "Get me up. Call Harvey and Dr. Pritchard." Those were his last words. He was put in his chair in a swoon, and passed painlessly away at 12:30, leaving a widow and four sons.
     The funeral will be Friday afternoon; place and hour to be announced later. The interment will be at Mound Hill by Hayward.
     John Wesley Miles was born Oct. 24, 1844, on his father's farm near Rutland, Meigs county, Ohio. He is the son of John B. and Mary Johnston Miles. His paternal grandparents were John B. and Chloe Jervis Miles, who left Rutland, Vermont, in 1800, came over the mountains to Pittsburg, and from there to Belpre on a flatboat with all their earthly possessions. At that place John B. Miles II was born Mar. 28, 1801. In 1802 the family floated to the mouth of Leading Creek in Meigs county and followed its lower bank through the virgin forest until near the cabin of Brewster Higley, the first settler in Rutland township, named after the Vermont community. The creek was very high, and Mrs. Miles called: "Brewster Higley, if you don't get us across this creek I'll go straight back to Rutland, Vermont!" "Why, that is Chloe Miles' voice," cried Higley. A sycamore was felled across the stream, and over it the Miles family went.
     Mary Johnston's parents were Wm. and Sarah Harmon Johnston, natives of Washington, Pa., who settled near Chester in Meigs county in 1800. She was a school teacher and met John B. Miles in the Cheshire neighborhood. Later his father gave him a farm near Rutland, now known as the Rice Longstreth farm, where J.W. Miles was born.
     In 1849 J.W. Miles' parents removed to Pomeroy, where they lived until 1856, when they went to Racine. In those two places J.W. received his schooling. At the age of 20 he enlisted in the 174th O.V.I., under Captain Eph Carson, and served to the close of the Civil War. After the war he attended commercial school at Dayton, O. In 1866 he came to Gallipolis and went into the marble business with his brother, Columbus Jervis Miles. In 1867 he sold out and went to Cattlesburg and started the first marble business in Northeastern Kentucky. There he remained 16 years, and in 1883 at the solicitation of his brother, returned to Gallipolis, and on his brother's death in 1885 succeeded to the business and conducted it until failing health compelled him to cease work.
     On May 27, 1868, he married Mary Frances McCormick, eldest daughter of Wm. H. and Catherine Hanson McCormick, and granddaughter of John R. and Sarah Ross McCormick and James and Jane Hanson.
Their children are: Wilbur Odell, of Columbus, Miliard L., employed at O.H.E., Clarence Nash, at Belleville; Waid Harvey, at Gallipolis. Mr. and Mrs. Miles adopted Ethel May at five years of age. She married matthew M. Mansfield at Clinton, Okla., where she now resides.
     At the age of 18, J.W. Miles joined the M.E. Church at Racine. He has since been active in church work as singer, chorister, Sunday School superintendent, and a member of official board for forty years. He was a member of Cadot Post, G.A.R., and having joined the Odd Fellows in 1866, was at one time district deputy Grand Master of Northeastern Kentucky. He later retired from the Order. Mr. Miles has had an active and busy career.

Gallipolis Daily Tribune
December 22, 1915
Transcribed by Henny Evans


Miles, John Wesley

     John Wesley Miles died at his home on Fourth Ave in Gallipolis at 12:30 a. m. Wednesday, December 22, 1915. The funeral will be conducted at Grace M. E. Church Friday afternoon at 1 o'clock by Revs. J. W. McCormick and W. D. Cherrington, under the direction of Cadot Post, G. A. R. Interment will be in the Mound Hill cemetery by Undertaker Hayward.
     The deceased was one of our best citizens and was held in high esteem by all. He was a brave soldier and led a Christian life and was honest and charitable in all his dealings with his fellowmen. He joined the M. E. Church when 15 and was always active in church affairs.
     Mr. Miles was born at Rutland, Meigs County, on October 21, 1844, the son of J. B. and Mary Johnston Miles. They later resided at Pomeroy and Racine, where he received his education in the public schools. At the age of 20 he enlisted in the 174th O. V. I. under Capt. Carson and served until the end of the Civil War. In 1866 he came to Gallipolis and went into the monument business with his brother C. J. Miles. In 1867 he moved to Catlettsburg where engaged in the same business for 16 years. In 1883 he returned to Gallipolis, re-entering monument business which he conducted until compelled to retire by ill health a few years ago.
     On May 27, 1869, Mr. Miles was married to Miss Mary Frances McCormick, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. W. H. McCormick, who with the following children survive him, Wilbur O., in the insurance business at Columbus; Miliard L., clerk at the O. H. E., Clarence N., dentist at Bellefontaine; W. Harvey, traveling salesman of Gallipolis. An adopted daughter, Ethel May, now Mrs. Matthew Mansfield of Clinton, Okla.

[Note: Has stone. Stone has D. November 22, 1915; obit December / Unit Co F 174th OVI]

Gallipolis Journal
December 23, 1915
Transcribed by Irene Hively Blamer                                                                 Top of Page


Miller, Cyrus C.

Death of Cyrus C. Miller
     Cyrus C. Miller, brother of Isaac W. and Jacob G. Miller, died at his home in Adelphia [sic], O Wednesday, April 17, in his 73rd year. He leaves his wife, Mrs. Eliza Miller, two sons, Edward B., of Gallipolis, and Ray. of Illinois, and one daughter Miss Ella Miller, whose faithful and loving care of an invalid father and a crippled mother bespeaks a noble character. He also leaves three brothers, the two above mentioned and Henderson who lives in Florida.
     His youth and many of his maturer years were spent in the vicinity of Wilkesville. In his youth, be became a member of the Wilkesville Presbyterian church and he remained an earnest christian to the last. His remains were brought to Wilkesville and the burial took place from the home of his brother, I.W. Miller, on Saturday, April 20, brief services being conducted at the house and at the grave by Dr. Chas. B. Taylor, his old schoolmate and lifetime friend. Mr. Newton Vaughan, a relative and the funeral director from Adelphi was in charge.
     Mr. Miller was a soldier of the civil war, Co. D, 194th O.V.I. His brother Thomas Seton Miller Co. B, 90th O.V.I., was killed at the battle of Stone River and another brother, Jacob G. of the same company, was captured at Chickamauga and was a prisoner at Andersonville and other southern prisons for eighteen months. A good man has gone to his rest.

[Note: Adelphi is in Ross County and Wilkesville is in Vinton County. Cyrus lived in Gallia County in the 1880's.]

Probably Ross County, Ohio newspaper
April 1918
Transcribed by Henny Evans


Miller, Daniel

Daniel Miller Ex-County Commisioner Dead
     Daniel Miller, Soldier and Citizen passes over the river. Ex-commsioner Daniel Miller died at his home at Mc Daniel's Sunday morning at one o'clock, June 5, 1910, of heart trouble. His funeral service will be Tuesday, but it was not known at this writing whether they would be conducted in Scioto County or in this. Mr. Miller was formerly of Scioto County and part of his folks are buried there.  He has been a resident here for 27 years and none of his people buried here.  However, it was thought likely that he would be buried in this County and that Rev. A. C. Carrier would conduct the religious services. Mr. Miller left a fine wife and five sons, Arthur, John, Lewis, William and Jacob, all married and prosperous and living right near the home place.  He was 65 or 66 years old and was in good circumstances.
     He entered the army for the cause of the Union when a very young man and served throughout the war and drew a pension for his disabilities. He was elected Commissioner of the County first, we think, in 1895 and served efficiently for three terms and had friends all over the County - lots of them.  He was always in favor of good roads and for he best interests of the people as he saw it.  He was a member of the Bethesda M. E. Church and afterward moved his relationship to Olive M. E. Church near where he lived.  He had been failing for the last five or six months and his death was not altogether unexpected but will be greatly regretted wherever he was known.

Gallipolis Daily Tribune
Volume XVI
Number 137
June 5, 1910
Gallipolis, Ohio
Transcribed by: Michael L. Trowbridge


Miller, I. N.

     I. N. Miller, Civil War Veteran of Company B. 191 Ohio Volunteer Infantry, formerly a resident of Cross Road, Gallia County, died at his home at Waterloo Tuesday at 2 P. M. at the age of 84. Uncle Nate, as he was familiarly known, had been an invalid for fifteen years, and not walked during all that time.
     He leaves his wife, Martha Ellen Miller, who has tenderly cared for him during his long period of ill health, and the following children: Ed, of Wheelersburg, Frank Miller and Mrs. William Maddy, of Toledo, and Mrs. Leonard Mc Donald, of Waterloo, Fred, of Cleveland, Mrs. Earl Cheatwood, of Gallia, Prof. E. R. Miller, of Ada, and Ethel, at home. Mr. and Mrs. Miller had been married sixty one years and this is the first death in their home. Their youngest child being thirty six years old.
     Funeral services were held Thursday at 2 P. M. at the Rehobeth M. E. Church, where he was a member. Rev. Barbe officiating. Burial in the cemetery there in charge of W. W. Phillips.

[Note: Buried in Lawrence County. B. 7/14/1845 D. 11/5/1929]

Gallipolis Daily Tribune
Volume XXXV
Number 263
November 7, 1929
Gallipolis, Ohio

Transcribed By: MLT                                                                                     Top of Page


Miller, Jacob
  
Funeral Services For Civil War Veteran  
     Jacob Miller, veteran of the Civil War was buried Sunday afternoon in Gravel Hill cemetery following funeral services at his late home on the Mill Creek road.  Mr. Miller was 86 years old and is survived by his wife and several children.

[Note: His tombstone reads that he was in Co. F, 60th OVI.]

Gallipolis Daily Tribune
May 1, 1929
Transcribed by Henny Evans

Miller, Jacob

Old Soldier Answers Call
     Mr. Jacob Miller of Mill Creek died at his home Saturday, April 27, 1929, after long illness. He is survived by his widow, three sons and a daughter. The funeral was Sunday, burial in Gravel Hill cemetery by Undertaker Butler. Mr. Miller was the last surviving civil war soldier in Addison township.

Gallipolis Daily Tribune
April 1929
Transcribed by Henny Evans


Miller, John

     Died, at the Merchants' Hotel, Sunday morning, at 11 o'clock, of pneumonia, Mr. John Miller, of Ansonia, O. Deceased was a member of the 18th U.S. Regulars, and served in the same company with the late N. N. Ralph. He was here on a visit to his son, who is an inmate of the O. H. E. The remains were shipped to his home by Undertaker Wetherholt, acting under orders of the Grand Army of the Republic.

Gallipolis Bulletin
Vol. xxviii No. 31
June 8, 1895
Transcribed by Margaret Calvin                                                                       Top of Page


Miller, Richard

Richard Miller Died Saturday
     Richard Miller, a native of Germany and a Civil War veteran, died at his home in this city Saturday evening. The funeral was Tuesday afternoon by Rev. Wood, interment in Pine Street Cemetery.
     He married Miss Susannah Rose of this county in 1863 and to them were born 12 children; six of whom, Alberta of Dayton; W.A. of Irwin, C.A. of Paynesville, B.A. of Mercerville; Mrs. H.E. Shoemaker of this city and Mrs. Chas. Houck of Minnesota, with their mother, 14 grandchildren and four great-grandchildren, survive him.

[Note: death certificate: Richard S.A.B. Miller was born Jan 11, 1828 in Saxony Welmer, Germany; died Feb. 8, 1919 in Gallipolis, Ohio; 90 years and 28 days of age. Parents names: unknown]

Gallipolis Paper
[no date]
Transcribed by F.K. Brown

[Note: From stone, Miller, Richard SAB - born 1829 / died 1919 / Unit Co I 173rd OVI Co K 60th OVI] from transcription by Irene Blamer


Milliron, George W.

     Mr. Geo. Millisor [Milliron], an old soldier, died at Cheshire, yesterday.

[Note: 1/24/1843 - 8/15/1905 - 62 yr. 7 m. 9 d. Cheshire Twp. Died of Cancer. Was in Civil War 9/2/1862 Co. H, 81st. O.V.I.; discharged 7/13/1865; Sampson Milliron, his father, entered and discharged same dates. Buried in Gravel Hill Cemetary.]

Gallipolis Daily Tribune
Cheshire News Notes
Friday, August 18, 1905
Transcribed by Sandy L. Milliron


Mills, William Waddell

Death of Dr. W.W. Mills
     Dr. William W. Mills, eldest son of John N. and Mary Mills of Green township, died at his residence in this city, Thursday, October 4th, at 8 o'clock, P.M. The deceased was born at the old homestead in Green township, June 6th, 1831. At the age of 23 years he graduated from the Starling Medical College at Columbus, having a few months previously married Margaret, daughter of Samuel Johnston. When the call came for troops, Dr. Mills went to Athens and enlisted in the 18th Ohio, under Gen'l. Grosvenor. He served as Surgeon three years and was discharged for disability, having contracted neuralgia, which it is believed, finally resulted in his death.
     Dr. Mills became a permanent resident of our city in 1873, and since he has been prominently identified with her political, business and social interests. He was a skillful surgeon, a cautious, prudent and wise physician. His fitness was recognized by an appointment as U.S. Pension Examiner at this point, under the Republican regime. In the dreaded year of '78, when yellow fever scourged city and vicinty and drove the citizens to the mountains, Dr. Mills attended the bedside of the dying. In political life the Doctor aspired to legislative honors and though defeated continued as a persistent campaigner. He reared a family of seven children. The deceased embraced the M.E. Church, and when the remains were laid in Mt. Zion Cemetery beside the loved ones gone before, the ministers of this faith, Revs. B.A. Stebbins, J.C. Arbuckle and W.H. Gibbons, administered the last church rites to the departed soul. The remains were cared for by the G.A.R. Post of this city, a delegation of that body accompanying the body to the outskirts of the city. The deceased held a life endowment of $2,000 in the Knights of Honor.

Gallipolis Journal
October 12, 1887
Transcribed by Henny Evans


Minor, Robert

     Robert Minor, Private, age 27, enlisted July 3d, 1861, from Perry township, died of chronic diarrhea at Young's Point, La., April 3d, 1863—unmarried.

[Note: His name was found on a list of soldiers who died in the war submitted by Captain William Grayum of the 4th West Virginia Infantry. Robert Minor was a private in his regiment, but this regiment was in Virginia on the date of his death, so the location and circumstance of death is almost certainly incorrect.]

Gallipolis Journal
September 21, 1865
Transcribed by Eva Swain Hughes


Mitchell, James A.

     James A. Mitchell, aged 19. Enlisted in Co. M, 7th O.V.C., from Gallipolis. Died of typhoid fever at Knoxville, Tenn., Oct. 10th, 1862, unmarried.

[Note: His name was found in a list of soldiers who died in the war. His father received his pension. The date of Oct. 10, 1862 is obviously incorrect. The 7th was not organized until Oct. 1862 and the regiment was located near Knoxville in October of 1863.]

Gallipolis Journal
September 7, 1865
Transcribed by Eva Swain Hughes


Moates, John

     John Moates, who has been sick the past two years with dropsical and heart trouble, died last Thursday morning at 7 o'clock, at his home in Maple Shade. He was united in marriage to Eliza J. Lovett on the 18th day of April, 1867, who, with two children--Frank, aged twenty-seven, and Cora, fourteen, survive him. He leaves one sister, Mrs. Margaret Spencer, of Columbus, and four brothers, Peter, of Ashland; George, of Ironton; James and Fred, of Columbus.
     Deceased served through the war in the Eighteenth Battery Light Artillery, under Captain C. C. Aleshire, and at the time of his death was a member of Cadot Post G. A. R., who had charge of the funeral, which occurred Saturday afternoon at 2 o'clock, Rev. Gelvin officiating and Wetherholt having charge of the burial at Mound Hill.
     After his return from the army, Mr. Moats went to work in the furniture factory and remained in the company's employ twenty-eight years, but was compelled to resign two years ago on account of ill health. He was an industrious man who counted his friends by the score.

[Note: b. 1842 d. 10/7/1897]

Gallipolis Journal
October 12, 1897
Transcribed by Irene Hively Blamer                                                                  Top of Page


Moler, Andrew L.

Andrew L. Moler
     Andrew L. Moler, who was a resident of Gallia county all his life until the last few years, died Oct. 18th, at the home of his daughter, Mrs. Andy Shively, of Baltimore, O., where he has made his home since the death of his wife about fourteen years ago.
     Mr. Moler was born in Gallia county, April 12, 1812 and died Oct. 18, 1905, aged 93 years, 6 months and 6 days. He was united in marriage to Nancy Vance in 1833. This union was blessed with 13 children. His wife and nine children preceded him to the spirit world. Two sons and two daughters still survive him; James, of Missouri, David, of Nebraska, Martha Willis, of Wellston and Ella shively, of Baltimore. The latter with whom he has made his home for the last fourteen years. For five years he has been a great sufferer.

[Note: He served as a Squirrel Hunter.]

Gallipolis Daily Tribune
November 7, 1905
Transcribed by Henny Evans


Mollohan, Wesley

     Mr. Mollohan was the son of Reverend Charles Mollohan, and was born in Braxton County, Virginia, January 31, 1841, and died while visiting in Kansas, September 25, 1911. His early education was obtained from the public schools of Gallia County, Ohio, and later at Gallipolis, Ohio, Academy [Gallia Academy High School]. When he quit the Academy he read law under the direction of the late Judge Simeon Nash at Gallipolis, one of the eminent lawyers and text writers of Southern Ohio. He was admitted to the Gallipolis Bar within two years of study. He, along with James Henry Nash (son of Judge Nash), a brilliant, brainy young attorney, came to Charleston, West Virginia, in 1865, opened a law office and began a business which was lucrative from the day they hung out their "shingle." Mr. Nash died in about ten years after his arrival and location at Charleston.
     Mr. Mollohan's practice embraced a period of nearly a half century and extended through the State and Federal Courts to the Supreme Court of the United States. He was recognized as one of the foremost, if not the best, equipped and strongest land lawyer West Virginia has thus far presented to the profession.
He married Mary E. Donnally of Warren, Ohio in 1872. They had five daughters surviving them.

[Note: He served as a Squirrel Hunter.]

Obit came from information from George Wesley Atkinson's Bench and Bar of West Virginia, 1919.
Died 1911
Abstracted by Henny Evans


Molohan, Arnold

     Arnold is reported in the newspaper as having served in Co. M, 3rd Virginia Cavalry. There is no record of his service nor does he have a tombstone in Pine Street Cemetery. He is reported to have died at the Gallipolis Field Hospital between June and July 1864.

Obit constructed from research and newspaper report
Gallipolis Journal
July 21, 1864
Transcribed by Henny Evans


Montgomery, James Henry Marion

Death of Colonel Montgomery.
A Natural Born Fighter Yields To The King Of Terrors.
     Colonel James Henry Montgomery of Bladen, Ohio, and of the galliant old 33rd Ohio Volunteers, died at his home Tuesday evening, January 18, 1898, at 9 o'clock, aged 65 years.
     He leaves an invalid wife and sons Lewis F., and George at home, Sherman in the West, and one daughter, Mrs. Darley Chapman of Central City.
     The Colonel had been in declining health for a year or two, and has not been to Gallipolis for a year or more, contenting himself to stay around home and caring for his wife.
     Monday in the night he was taken ill with kidney trouble.  Dr. W. J. Fletcher, who had attended him on many occassions when he was afflicted in that way, was called, but was unable to arrest the progress of his trouble, and uremic poisoning set in which ended in his death as stated. At this writing we have not the particulars of the funeral services, nor data at hand in regard to his eventual life, but may have something more to say at a future date.
     Colonel Montgomery was one of the first to enlist to fight for his County's cause in 1861.  He raised a company, was elected lieutenant, became its colonel at the close of the war.  He participated in many of the bloodiest battles of the war and was wounded repeatedly, being shot entirely, we believe, through both lungs, but owing to his wondereful vitality survived every wound, sickness and hardship to the last.  He was a tremendous man physically and courageous as a lion.  He was a man of strong intellect, too, quite an orator, and took a lively interest in politics and all public matters.  He represented this County as a Republican in the Legislature.

[Note: Date of birth would have been about 1833]

Gallipolis Daily Tribune
Volume IX
Number 16
January 19, 1898
Gallipolis, Ohio

Transcribed By: MLT                                                                                       Top of Page

James H. M. Montgomery

A Tribute To An Old Soldier.
To The Editor Of The Tribune:
     In August, 1861, when the life of this Nation was imperiled, Captain James H. M. Montgomery recruited a company of men was assigned Company F, 33rd Regiment, Ohio Volunteer Infantry, and went forth to battle for the Stars and Stripes. This Regiment went into the field. Captain Montgomery was always ready with his Company for duty. This Company was composed of Gallia County boys, many of whom did not return, but today fill an unknown grave beneath a Southern sky. After passing through many haard contested battles, this Regiment was engaged in the Battle of Cickamauga, Georgia, September 19 and 20, 1863, in which Captain Montgomery was wounded in the thigh and also lost his left eye from the effects of a spent ball striking him in the temple. Colonel John W. Sill was the first Colonel of this Regiment, Colonel Oscar F. Moore of Portsmouth, the second Colonel, and was in comand at the Battle of Chickamauga, Georgia, Col. Sill having previously to Brigadier General. Colonel O. F. Moore resigned his commision on the 20th of July, 1864. Captain Montgomery was promoted to Lieutenant Colonel September 26, 1863, and at the resignation Colonel of that galliant old Regiment and remained in command until the close of the war when the Regiment was mustered out of service and they returned to their homes.  Colonel Montgomery, while leading a charge in front of Atlanta the entire body, the ball penetrating his right lung.  He was taken off the field for dead, but being a man of undaunted courage and would give way to his feelings, he speedily recovered and soon returned to his command.
     This gallant old Regiment, under command of Colonel Montgomery, charged Missionary Ridge amid shot and shell and climbed the mountain and was the first to gain the summit and drive the rebels from their position, terminating in a glorious victory.  Colonel Montgomery was a soldier in the true sense; he was a loyal and patriotic citizen, but like Garfield, Sheridan, Sherman, Crook, Logan and others has joined the mighty hosts on the other shore.  Peace to his ashes andrest to his soul.
     OLD SOLDIER.

Gallipolis Daily Tribune
Volume IX
Number 18
January 21, 1898
Gallipolis, Ohio

Transcribed By: MLT


Moodispaugh, Jacob

     Jacob Moodispaugh, an old soldier resident of the Gallia neighborhood passed away at his home Oct. 29. He was about 88 years of age. Besides his wife, he leaves several grown children. The funeral was held Friday at the Gallia Baptist Church.

The Gallia Times
November 6, 1918
Transcribed by Irene Hively Blamer                                                                  Top of Page


Moore, A. F.

     Mr. A. F. Moore died early Tuesday morning, January 12, 1909, after an illness of two years. He had been confined to the house for several months and Friday was taken worse. Sunday afternoon his condition became serious and lost consciousness Monday morning. The end was peaceful.
     Mr. Moore was a native of Columbiana county and was born, on February 22, 1838. He was of Irish stock, his parents coming to this country in the early days of the last century. He was married to Miss Belle Stoors, of Marietta, in 1863 and came to Gallipolis in 1869.
     He served in the 39th regiment O. V. I. and later was an engineer on a U. S. gunboat. At the close of the war he followed the river as engineer until 1872 when he entered the insurance and real estate business in this city which he managed successfully until he sold out a few years ago and formed a partnership with P. T. Wall in real estate and brokerage business. His health compelled him to abandon all business in November 1906.
     Besides his wife he leaves two children, Mrs. John Norvell, of Charleston, and Miss Eleanor Moore of this city. A son Alfred Stoors Moore died in infancy and a daughter, Mrs. Anna Briggs died in April 1906. He also leaves several sisters.
     The funeral services were conducted at his late home Thursday afternoon by Rev. Maguire of the Presbyterian Church and Rev. Ernest Mayer, interment following at Pine street cemetery. He had been a member of the Masons for over a quarter of a century and the Knights Templars had charge of the services. The pall bearers were C. M. Adams, S. A. Dunbar, J. R. Safford, Thos. L. Bell, S. A. Rathburn and J. H. Ewing.

Gallipolis Bulletin
January 12, 1909
Transcribed by Irene Hively Blamer


Moore, Barney

Aged Resident Dead

     Barney Moore, for many years a resident of Guyan Township, died at his home in Huntington, W.va., last Thursday. He was eighty-five years old and a veteran of the Civil War. He was the father of ten children, seven of whom are living. He belonged to the colony of emigrants that came to Guyan Township, from Noble county in the early seventies.
     The funeral and burial occurred in Huntington, Sunday afternoon and many of Mr. Moore's relatives from this community attended the services.

[He served in Co. I, 67th Ohio Volunteer Infantry. He was born in 1844 and died July 18, 1925.]

Gallia Times
July 23, 1925
Transcribed by Henny Evans                                                                          Top of Page


Moore, Edward Thomas

E.T. Moore Dies at Charleston
Former Gallipolis Business Man Expires at Age of 75
     Edward Thomas Moore died at McMillen Hospital in Charleston, W.Va., at 6 o'clock this Friday morning of a general nervous breakdown. He spent the winter at Battle Creek, and stopped at Charleston about six weeks ago while on his way to Florida. He was 75 years old the 5th of April last.
     Mr. Moore was born in Center County, Penn. While at Gambier College he enlisted in the 12th O.V.I., and served in the Union Army from 1861 to 1865, being a member of McCoy Post, G.A.R., of Columbus. After the war he went into the book business in Charleston, coming to Gallipolis in 1878, where he owned a book store until about 1904, after which he traveled for a wholesale wall paper house.
     He was married in 1866 to Miss Martha Blake. Four children resulting from that union, survive him--Edward in California, Frank M. and S.A. in Gallipolis, and Harry in California. One brother, Will, lives at Chattanooga.
     The funeral will be at Charleston Sunday afternoon. Mr. Moore has been a member of the Methodist Church since his early manhood, and has been a large giver to the church institutions, his contributions to the Board of Foreign Missions totaling some $5,000 in the last few years. He was also a member of a
Columbus Masonic Lodge.
     Mr. Moore was a man of fine business training, thorough in all the details of his business, and a constant money-maker. He was a great reader and found time for study in many directions outside his regular business activities.

Gallipols Daily Tribune
June 5, 1914
Transcribed by Henny Evans


Moore, Jacob

Jacob Moore Dead
     Jacob William, son of Caleb and Rebecca Moore, was born June 24, 1844, in Springfield township, Gallia county, Ohio, and departed this life Sept. 30th 1922, aged 78 years, 3 months and 6 days.
     On August 6, 1864, he was united in marriage to Mary E. White, and to them were born six children. Two daughters and one son have crossed the river before him. His aged wife and three children, Thomas J., Mrs. Martha Kemper, Mrs. Eliza Kemper, twenty grandchildren, and nine great grandchildren survive him.
     Besides his immediate family, he leaves three brothers, Timothy and Caleb of Gallipolis, and Joseph of Columbus, and one sister, Mrs. Sophia Denney of Columbus.
     About two weeks after his marriage he was called to the defense of his country, where he served faithfully until he was honorably discharged. Later in life, about 50 years ago, he joined that other army, the army of the Lord with Jesus as his captain, and was an ardent, valiant soldier of the cross.
     Funeral services were conducted on Monday, Oct. 2, at Prospect church by Rev. R. R. Denney and burial followed in the Prospect cemetery. The pall bearers were six of his grandsons, Earl, Jake and Teddy Moore, Claude, Marion and Marriell Kemper.

[Note: Served in Co. D, 179th OVI]

The Gallia Times
September 30, 1922
Transcribed by Margaret Calvin                                                                       Top of Page


Moore, James A.

Death of James A. Moore

     Mr. James A. Moore, of Harris, died Dec. 12, 1900, about 59 years old. He was an old soldier belonging to Co. M, 7th O.v.C., during the Civil war, and was a very fine man. He leaves a wife, one son and three step-children. He drew a pension of $12 for disabilities. He had been down a week from a stroke of paraylysis. The funeral services were conducted by Rev. W.J. Fulton and Undertaker Dan Glassburn, the burial at the Long cemetery.

Gallipolis Weekly Tribune
December 21, 1900
Transcribed by Henny Evans


Moore, Lafayette

     Lafayette Moore, one of Guyan township's best citizens, passed away on Sunday, January 4, 1914, aged 70 years. The funeral was conducted at the Good Hope Church Tuesday, burial following in the church cemetery.

[Note: Co. H 116th OVI]

Gallipolis Bulletin
January 8, 1914
Transcribed by Irene Hively Blamer                                                                  Top of Page


Morehart, Adam

     By telegraph we have the sad news of the death of Capt. Wm. L. Gardner and 1st Lieut. Adam Morehart, of the 8th Va. Mounted Infantry, who were killed on Wednesday, the 26th ult., in a skirmish with the rebels near Rocky Gap, about nine miles from Lewisburg, in West Virginia. These gentlemen were both citizens of Gallipolis, and highly esteemed as honest, worthy men. Capt. Gardner leaves a family to mourn his loss. Lieut. Morehart was a native of Germany, but for some years resided in Gallipolis, where he has a sister and brother yet living. [. . .]

The Gallipolis Journal
September 3, 1863
Transcribed by Eva Swain Hughes


Morgan, William R.

     William Rufus Morgan, who has been seriously ill for the past six weeks died Thursday morning at the Holzier hospital. The body was removed to the home of his sister-in-law, Mrs. Libbie Morgan, where the funeral services were held Saturday morning by Rev. C. E. Mackenzie.
     Mr. Morgan, who was familiarly known as "Pum" was the son of Dr. Elisha and Salina Town Morgan who came here from New York in 1847. He was the third of seven children viz., Henry W., Salem, Dr. Charles and Miss Mary all deceased and Capt. J. Frank Morgan of Ironton and Capt. Ed Morgan of this city. He was united in marriage to Miss Sallie Martin of Vinton and they became the parents of two sons, William and Floyd. William died in Cincinnati a number of years ago. Mrs. Morgan died several years ago in this city. His son Floyd, who survives him is manager of a large cotton exchange in New Orleans. He was with his father during the first of his illness and arranged everything for his comfort, but was unable to return for the funeral.
     Mr. Morgan was Lieutenant in Captain Aleshires Company in the War of the Rebellion and participated in one of the worst battles of the war at Franklin, Tenn. He was for a number of years connected with the Eureka Flour Mills and later was engaged in business in Cincinnati and New Orleans. He was universally well liked and numerous friends here and elsewhere will regret to learn of his death.


Morgan, William Rufus

     William Rufus Morgan died at the Holzer Hospital in this city Thursday morning April 17, 1912, aged 74 years. The body was taken to the home of his sister-in-law, Mrs. Libie Morgan, on Third Avenue, where the funeral services were conducted Saturday afternoon by Rev. MacKenzie of St. Peter's Episcopal Church, interment following at Mound Hill Cemetery by Undertaker Hayward. Mr. Morgan was the son of the late Dr. Elisha and Salina Town Morgan.
    At the beginning of the Civil War he enlisted as a Lieutenant in Capt. Charles C. Aleshire's Battery and was in one of the most hotly contested battles of the war at Franklin, Tennessee. He was for a time manager of the Eureka Flour Mills for the Aleshires. About this time he was married to Miss Sallie Martin and two children were born to this union. William and Floyd. He is survived by brothers, Ed Morgan of this city and Frank Morgan of Ironton, his wife and son William died several years ago. Mr. Morgan was a highly respected and useful citizen and his death brings much sorrow to a wide circle of warm friends.

[Note: from stone born June 4, 1832 died April 18, 1912 / Death Record Vol II / Unit 18th OLA S&S]

Gallipolis Journal
April 24, 1912
Transcribed by Irene Hively Blamer                                                                  Top of Page


Morris, Hiram

     Hiram Morris, private Co. I, 27th Reg't. O.V.I., died at U.S. Hospital at Beaufort, S.C., April 14th, 1865, leaving a widow and children.

[Note: His name was found in a list of soldiers who died in the war. His widow and minors received a pension. This regiment was among those with Sherman on his March to the Sea, after which they marched north through the Carolinas. The death occurred five days after the war ended and on the same day as Lincoln's assassination.]

Gallipolis Journal
November 9, 1865
Transcribed by Eva Swain Hughes


Morris, Jackson

Death of Jackson Morris
     Jackson Morris was born Sept. 12, 1840 in West Virginia, died Jan. 10, 1909, aged 68 yrs., 8 mo. and 28 days. His parents died when he was quite young and he was brought up near Rio Grande, Ohio, in the family of Harrison Wood.
     When our country was in its perilous condition and called for protection , he was one of those noble boys who volunteered his service for his country, enlisting in the 91st Ohio Volunteer Infantry and served for 8 years. He endured many privations and hardships.
     In the year 1861 he was united in marriage to Amanda Shelton. The greater portion of their married life was spent in Washington and California and when they returned they located on the old Shelton homestead near Wales, Ohio, where Mrs Morris departed this life Dec. 14, 1904.
     On Sept. 21, 1905 the deceased was married to Mrs. Jane Cartright of Gallipolis, Ohio, who survives him, besides he [sic] leaves other relatives who live in West Va. Mr. Morris joined the U. S. church at Wales, Ohio about 2 yrs. ago under the present pastor. All was done that kind hands could do, but could not stay death's hands. He was an industrious man and the community has lost a good neighbor and a kind friend. His sad death is an evidence that God works in a mysterious way.

Gallipolis Bulletin
Jan. 29, 1909
Transcribed by Karen Strojin


Morrison, John H.

John H. Morrison
Soldier, Farmer and Merchant, Paid Nature's Last Debt
     Mr. John H. Morrison of Evergreen, one of the best known and best liked and respected men of the county, passed away at his home at ten p. m. Wednesday, May 7, 1919, after a two weeks' illness. He was in his 75th year. Mr. Morrison is survived by his widow, Cynthia Cherrington Morrison, two sons, William A. of Delaware, and Edgar T., of Bidwell, and one daughter Mrs. Horace M. Bing of Delaware. He has two sisters, Mrs. Elizabeth Boley and Mrs. Annette Odell, both of West Virginia.
     He was born in Nicholas County, W. Va., and resided there until 16 years of age, coming to this county then and resided here ever since. He and his good wife were married in 1866, after his return from service in the Civil War in the 23rd O. V. I.
     For many years he has farmed and conducted a merchandizing [sic] business at Evergreen, where he won the confidence and respect of all with whom he came in contact. He was a life-long member of the Methodist Church and an ardent advocate of all that makes life brighter and better, sincere and kindly, and his friendships were many and lasting.
     The funeral services were held at Westerman Church near his late home Friday afternoon, conducted by Rev. J. F. Gordon, his pastor, Rev. Arthur P. Cherrington, his nephew, and The Rose Commandery, Knight Templars, of this city, of which he had long been a valued member. The interment followed in the Cherrington cemetery by Wetherholt & Entsminger of this city.

Gallia Times
May 14, 1919


Morrison, John H.

John Morrison Aged Veteran Died May 7th
     John H. Morrison died at 10 o'clock Wednesday night, May 7, at his home in Evergreen, after an illness of two weeks. He was one of Springfield Tp's. best known men having been successfully engaged in the mercantile business at Evergreen for many years. He was in his 75th year.
     The decedant [sic] was born in Nicholas County, W. Va., and came to this county when 16 years old.
He was married in 1866 to Cynthia Cherrington in a happy union which lasted about 53 years. In 1863 he enlisted as a corporal in the 23 O. V. I., and served to the close of the war, in which he was wounded. He witnessed Sheridan's famous ride to Winchester.
     He was a life-long Methodist and an active supporter to his church. Kind, genial, hospitable he won high-esteem, and lived a useful life.
     The immediate relatives surviving are his widow; two sons, W. A. Morrison of Delaware, O., and Edward T., Bidwell merchant; one daughter, Mrs. H. M. Bing, also of Delaware; two sisters, Mrs. Elizabeth Boley and Mrs. Annettee Odell of Hominy Falls and Gad, W. Va., respectively.
     The funeral was at Westerman Church Friday at 2 p. m., with services by Rev. J. F. Gordon and Rev. A. P. Cherrington, his nephew, and by the Rose Commandery of Knights Templars, of which he was a member. Interment by Wetherholt & Entsminger at the Cherrington Cemetery.

[Note: John H. Morrison born October 24, 1844, served in Unit Co. D, 23rd, O. V. I. His stone (John K. Morrison 1843-May 7, 1919, per family stone John H. Morrison) is located in Pine Hill (Evergreen) Cemetery.]

Gallipolis Bulletin
May 15, 1919
Transcriptions by Karen Strojin                                                                      Top of Page


Morrison, William S.

[Died about two weeks after being parolled as a prisoner of war. Buried in Bethel Cemetery in Addison Township.]

SACRED TO THE MEMORY

of Willie S. Morrison, Co. L, 7th O.V.C.

God has sent rest to the weary young life,
Led him away from oppression and wrong,
Opened his eyes in the City of light,
Taught him to join in the angels' song.

Breaking the prison-bars of his soul,
By suffering refined and made pure,
Risen triumphantly, o'er death and the grave,
No more of earth's ills to endure.

Soon o'er his breast will the long grass wave,
And flowers their beauty display—
The Summer's night dew-drops be there,
When "rosy dawn" heralds the day.

Let ought, but the voice of bird music,
Break upon the sweet calm of the air,
Or a soft sigh of mournful love,
When the twilight is gathering there.
R.A.B.

The Gallipolis Journal
March 16, 1865

Morrison, William S.

     William S. Morrison, aged 18 years, enlisted in Co. L, 7th O.V.C. 29th Aug. 1862 from Gallipolis township. Captured Nov. 6, 1863, at Rogersville, Tenn. Held as prisoner until Dec. 8th, 1864, died in Hospital at Annapolis, Md., on his way home from prison, Dec. 24th, 1864.

[Note: The above is taken from a list of those who died in the war. He is buried in Bethel Cemetery in Addison Township.]

The Gallipolis Journal
August 24, 1865
Transcribed by Eva Swain Hughes


Morrow, Henry

     Henry Morrow, age 69 years, an old soldier and a member of the 173rd O. V. I. Company C, died suddenly Saturday with paralysis. The funeral services were held Monday at the Presbyterian Church and the burial was at Pine St cemetery under the direction of...[missing text] of which he was a member.

Gallipolis Journal
December 3, 1913
Transcribed by Irene Hively Blamer


Morton, David L.

     David L. Morton enlisted from Clay township, in the 18th O.V.I. for 3 months in the spring of 1861. Served out his time with credit and in 1862, enlisted in Co. B, 91st O.V.I. for 3 years, was killed at the battle of Winchester, Va., 19th Sept. 1864, aged 23 years. He was a model soldier and died unmarried.

[Note: The above is taken from a list of those who died in the war. He has a stone in Clay Chapel Cemetery in Clay Township but is reported elsewhere as buried in Winchester National Cemetery, Winchester, Virginia.]

The Gallipolis Journal
August 24, 1865
Transcribed by Eva Swain Hughes


Mossman, Andrew J.

DIED
     Mossman--Monday night, near Hawk's Station, Vinton county, Ohio, MR. ANDREW J. MOSSMAN, with disease of the lungs, in his 41st year. He leaves a wife and 7 children--2 girls and 5 boys. He was a soldier in the late war, was in Company D, 195 Ohio, from which he never fully recovered. He was raised and lived in this county until in the last few years. The deceased was the youngest brother of Albert Mossman, of this city. He was a kind father and a good husband.

Gallipolis Journal
Wednesday, May 19, 1886
Transcribed by Karen Strojin                                                                          Top of Page


Mossman, Charles

Charles Mossman Dead
     Charles Mossman, aged about 75 years, and a brother of Mr. J. D. Mossman of Springfield township, died suddenly last Tuesday morning of heart trouble at his home at Waterloo.
     He was born in Gallia County and is survived by his wife and two daughters.

[Note: Pvt. Co. K 36th OVI]

Gallipolis Times
February 21, 1917
Vol. 8?
Transcribed by Jan Rader


Mossman, Charles

Death of Waterloo Resident.

     Charles Mossman, aged about 75 years, died at his home at Waterloo at an early hour (this) Tuesday morning, Feb. 13, 1917, following an illness with heart trouble.
     He was born in Gallia county and has resided in this and Lawrence county all of his life. He married the daughter of Thomas Cooper who with two daughters in the West and one brother J. D. Mossman of Bidwell survive him.
     He was a prominent citizen and has numerous friends in both counties who will mourn his death. He was a veteran of the Civil War.
     The funeral arrangements have not been decided upon awaiting the arrival of his daughters.

Gallipolis Daily Tribune
February 13, 1917
Transcribed by Joanne Galvin


Mossman, Charles

Old Soldier Charles Mossman Passes Away
     Charles Mossman, aged about 75 years, died at his home at Waterloo early Tuesday morning, Feb. 13, 1917, following an illness with heart trouble.
     He was born in Gallia County and has resided in this and Lawrence County all of his life. He is survived by his wife, who is a daughter of Thomas Cooper, two daughters in the West, and one brother, J. D. Mossman of Bidwell R. D. He was an old soldier and a fine citizen.

[Note: Per Soldiers & Sailors, Charles Mossman served in Unit Co. K, 36th, O. V. I.]

Gallipolis Journal
February 15, 1917
Transcribed by Karen Strojin                                                                          Top of Page


Mossman, John William

Veteran Dead
     John Mossman, a Civil War veteran making his home with John Scarberry on Mill Creek, expired suddenly on the street, near the Alma Hotel Monday. He was aged 75 years and was a brother of David Mossman, a former Superintendent of the County Infirmary. The remains were handled by Undertaker Wetherholt and he was laid to rest in Pine St. cemetery under the religious services of Rev. Mr. Powell.

[Note: John Mossman served in Unit Co. I, 173rd, O. V. I. Per Death Records Vol. II, he was born in 1839 and died March 16, 1914.]

Gallipolis Journal
March 20, 1914
Transcribed by Karen Strojin

Mossman, John William

Dropped Dead
     John Mossman, 78, a well known old soldier of Gallipolis, dropped dead on the sidewalk in front of Mr. John E. Mills' residence on Second avenue Monday at noon. He had been a sufferer from heart trouble for sometime and the end came in a flash.
      Mr. Mossman was a member of the 173rd Ohio during the war. After his enlistment he drifted west and none of his relatives heard anything of him for perhaps 20 years. He had been twice married, but for sometime past had been making his home at Dr. John Scarberry's on Mill Creek. He had a number of relatives in various parts of Gallia County.

Gallia Times
March 18, 1914
Transcribed by Henny Evans


Mowry, William P.

     Wm. P. Mowry, Private, age 23, enlisted July 21st, 1861, from Guyan township, killed by accident at Cumberland, Md., Jan. 1st, 1865—unmarried, leaving a widowed mother.

[Note: His name was found in a list of soldiers who died in the war. He served in Co. G, 4th West Virginia Infantry and 2nd West Virginia Veteran Infantry.]

Gallipolis Journal
September 21, 1865
Transcribed by Eva Swain Hughes


Mullineux, James

A Good Man Gone
     James Mullineux, 69, a former well known building contractor of Gallipolis, died very suddenly while seated in a chair at his home in this city Sunday evening about 7 o'clock. His funeral services will be held Thursday at his late home under the directions of the Masonic and G. A. R. orders.
     Mr. Mullineux was a native of this city and had lived here all his life. During the civil war he enlisted in the First Ohio Heavy Artillery and served three years. Later he and his brothers operated the Mullineux planing mill until a few years ago. After the war he was united in marriage to Miss Anna Kuhn, sister of Mayor Kuhn, who with one son, Edward, of this city, and daughter, Mrs. Stockton Downtain of Warsaw, Ky., survives him. One brother, Mr. John Mullineux, three half brothers, Joseph, Fred and Charles and one half sister, Mrs E. L. Neal all of this city also survive him.

[Note: James Mullineux served in Unit Co. G, 1st, O. V. H. A. Per Death Records Vol. II, he was born August 4, 1844 and died January 18, 1914. His stone is located in Pine Street Cemetery.]

Gallipolis Bulletin
January 22, 1914
Transcribed by Karen Strojin                                                                          Top of Page


Mullineux, John

Death of John Mullineux
Sterling Citizen and Veteran of the Civil War Passes Quietly Away
     Though the death of John Mullineux had been anticipated as an event that might occur at any time for months past, yet his passing June 29 was an occurence of more than local interest. He was known over the county for years as a member of a contracting firm which had constructed Rio Grande College, and other public buildings and many of the handsomest residences in town and county. In that work he had spent the vigor of his youth, his best years of mature manhood and when nature called for his retirement he still lingered at the old planing mill. It was a calling that came down from his father and the noteworthy fact of the occupation was that he and his brothers, associates, had given the name Mullineux the honor and prestige of conscientious and honest dovetail of good material and skillful workmanship. He found time, though to shoulder a musket and defend the union of the States with his full heritage of British blood and courage.
     Mr. Mullineux was a modest individual, as clean, patriotic and loyal in his duty to his community as any citizen the town ever had. His domestic life was ideal and fruitful, and he was granted the scriptural limit of years because an even, consistent performance of the duties of a good husband and splendid father make for years.
     The deceased was born at Wilkesville February 26, 1839. February 12, 1862, he married America Day and she with sons Will and Harry and Mrs. Roscoe J. Mauck, survive him. With the death of his mother, the father married again at Hamden, the second set of children, who survive, being Joseph and Charles and Mrs E. Lincoln Neal of this city and Fred Mullineux at Chicago.
     The funeral services were held Thursday at the family residence, by Rev. F. M. Evans of the Grace M. E. Church.

[Note: John Mullineux served in Unit 4th, Wv., V. I. His stone is located in Mound Hill Cemetery.]

Gallipolis Journal
July 3, 1914
Transcribed by Karen Strojin


Murray, Robert

    Robert Murray aged 26, enlisted from Morgan township in Aug. 1864, died at home on the day after his return, 10th July 1865. Leaves a widow and five children.

[Note: He enlisted in Co. I, 173rd Ohio Volunteer Infantry. He left a widow Mary and children Nancy J., Susan, Peter, Eunice and John. He is buried in Clark Chapel Cemetery in Morgan Township and the stone reads July 14, 1865. The 173rd was a regiment that was organized in Gallipolis and served from Sept. 1864 until June 1865 in Nashville, Tennessee.]

The Gallipolis Journal
August 24, 1865
Transcribed by Eva Swain Hughes


Myers, Alfred W.

     Died, in New Orleans, Jan.11th, 1869, of congestion of the lungs, Alfred W. Myers; aged 31 years and 5 months. He was, during a portion of the war, connected with the Quartermaster's Department at this place.

The Gallipolis Jourrnal
January 28, 1869
Transcribed by Eva Swain Hughes


Nanna, Jordan

Mr. Jordan Nanna Dead
     Mr. Jordan Nanna died at 2 o'clock (this) Monday afternoon, July 27, 1914, after an illness of a few days from paralysis, aged 71. Mr. Nanna was a Veteran of the Civil War and drew a pension.
     Mr. Nanna was at one time a well to do farmer and lived at Rodney several years back. He operated a threshing machine outfit for many years. Mr. Nanna's son and daughters are here from Pittsburg, arriving a short time before his death. Hayward conducts funeral.

Gallipolis Daily Tribune
Volume XX
Number 175
July 27, 1914
Gallipolis, Ohio

Transcribed By: MLT                                                                                      Top of Page


Nash, Frank

Death of Frank Nash
     Mr. Frank Nash, son of the late Judge Simeon Nash, died at the Athens hospital on Thursday morning, November 2, 1905. The remains were brought here Friday afternoon and taken to the residence of Mr. W. C. Hayward, where brief services were conducted by Rev. Meyers, of the Episcopal Church, the burial following at Mound Hill cemetery. The deceased is survived by a wife and one daughter.
     Mr. Nash spent the greater part of his life in this city. During the war he became a telegraph operator and had important posts of duty. He afterward became a Quartermaster's clerk in the army and was at various other points. He was a fine clerk, neat and attractively genteel in manners and dress, talented and full of fun and wit he made desirable company in almost any circle. After his mother's death he opened a large queensware store in Huntington, but was not a success at that.
     Following the failure in business at Huntington the family moved to Pittsburg, Pa., (sic( but the worry over business failures and continued ill health unbalanced Mr. Nash's mind and he came to this city and sought and through the influence of friends was admitted to the Athens hospital.
     At one time Mr. Nash assumed the leadership of the Gallia county Democracy, and built up a large and well organized Democratic club that was a credit to the party and to the town. He was the only Democrat in the Nash family.

[Note: Per family stone, Frank Nash was born April 30, 1845.]

Gallipolis Bulletin
November 10, 1905
Transcribed by Karen Strojin

Nash, Frank

Death of Frank Nash
Was a Son of the Late Judge Simeon Nash
     Mr. Frank Nash, son of the late Judge Simeon, and son-in-law of the late Mr. and Mrs. Roman
Menager, and brother of the late Jonas Neal, the late Gen. W.H. Nash U.S.A., the late James Henry Nash, a distinguished lawyer of Charleston, W.Va., the late Simeon Nash, Jr., attorney at the Gallipolis bar and Mrs. Lemuel Perry, now residing in Florida, died Thursday morning, Nov. 2, 1905, at the Athens Hospital.
     He lived here the greater part of his life. His mother was an invalid for many years and he remained here and took care of her greatly to his own disadvantage. The family had mostly passed away, and those remaining were scattered, his mother was practically helpless and he remained with her until she passed away.
     During the war he became a telegraph operator and had important posts of duty. He afterward
became a Quartermaster's clerk in the army and was at various points, the longest time we think down in Texas. He was a fine clerk, neat and attractively genteel in manners and dress, talented and full of fun and wit he made desirable company in almost any circle. After his mother's death he opened a large queensware store in Huntington, but was not a success at that.
     Mrs. Menager, his wife's mother, was an own [sic] cousin, we believe, of General U.S. Grant. She had relatives in Pittsburg, Rev. C.S. Thompson, son-in-law and his wife, her daughter, and, if we mistake not, others. At any rate after Mr. Nash's failure in business in Huntington sometime, they all went to Pittsburg to live. Mr. Nash's health failed him and it is said his habits were not good. Mrs. Menager died. Before this, however, Frank drifted down here, mentally unbalanced to some extent, but he himself felt that he was losing his mind and desired to get into the hospital. Through influence of his distinguished father's old friends he succeeded in getting into the Athens Hospital four or five years ago. At one time he assumed the leadership of the Gallia County Democracy, built up a large and well organized Democratic Club, that was quite a
credit to the party and we might say to the town, but he began to try to use it against Colonel Vance and it went to pieces. He was the only Democrat in the whole Nash family.
     When he was a young man he was very pleasant in disposition, but as he grew older sickness and other disappointments of one kind and another caused him to grow morose and he isolated himself from all of his companions and the end has come. He will be remembered kindly by a host of boyhood friends and who will deeply regret that life once so promising should turn out with him as it did. He is survived by his wife Mrs. Mary Menager Nash and one daughter.

Gallipolis Daily Tribune
November 3, 1905
Transcribed by Henny Evans


Nash, James Henry

Sudden Death
     Monday morning a telegram was received in the city announcing the death of James Henry Nash, Esq., at Charleston, W.Va. He was found dead in his bed that morning. He was a son of Judge Nash, of this city, and in his thirty-sixth year. He leaves a wife and children. The remains were brought to this city, and buried Wednesday forenoon, from the residence of Judge Nash.
     The following gentlemen accompanied the remains from Charleston as Pall Bearers:--Col. T.B. Swan, Capt. J.W. Cracraft, Maj. O. Fontaine, A. Burlew, R.H. Freer and C.P. Snider. The following gentlemen acted as Pall Bearers here:--Capt. J.A. Hamilton, Capt. E.S. Aleshire, E.H. Neal, C.W. Cherrington, Prof. E.W. Chase, and J.H. Evans.
     Mr. Nash was one of the leading lawyers of the Charleston bar. His sudden, early death is greatly to be regretted, and much sympathy will go out to his relatives and friends.

[Note: He served as a Squirrel Hunter.]

Gallipolis paper found in scrapbook
June 1876
Transcribed by Henny Evans                                                                          Top of Page


Nash, Samuel Adams

Samuel A. Nash Dead
Succumbs to Disease Incident to Old Age
Last of the Line of Old Time Gallia County Lawyers

     Hon. Samuel Adams Nash of this city departed this life Monday evening, at 7:15, September 21, 1903. His funeral services will be conducted by Rev. Father Kessler at St. Louis Catholic Church, Thursday morning at 9 o'clock, the interment following at Mound Hill cemetery under the direction of Hayward & Son.
     Mr. Nash was born at South Hadley, Massachusetts, July 17, 1822, and was consequently passed 81 years of age. He was the youngest in the family of eight sons and one daughter, of Simeon and Amy Nash. His brothers the late Judge Simeon Nash and Hon. William Nash preceded him in coming to Gallipolis, but he came here about the year 1847.
     He taught school for a time after coming here, and when he taught at Kyger Mrs. Augusta Johnston of this city, Mr. James Tate of Kyger, and perhaps others whose names we have not by us, were pupils. While teaching and afterward perhaps he read law in the office of his brother Simeon, and was admitted to the bar and became one of the foremost lawyers at the Gallipolis bar.
     He was united in marriage with Miss Ruth Early, a sister of the late General Jubal Early in 1856. Three children two sons and a daughter were born unto them. The sons are dead. His wife and daughter, Miss Amy Nash survive him.
     After his first coming to Gallipolis it has always been his home and he has resided at the corner of Third and State streets for many years. His sister spoken of married Dr. Horace Nye of about Zanesville but his death closes the record of his parents' family, he being the last to go.
     Mr. Nash was a very able man. Not only was he well read in the law but he was an eloquent and convincing advocate. He was well read in standard literature and was well versed in political history, past and present. He was a candidate for Congress of the Liberal Republicans during the Greeley national campaign and was endorsed by the Democrats, but suffered the fate of that ticket.He was not only an attractive and eloquent orator, but he was a profound thinker and was entitled to more than he ever received. Deafness overtook him several years ago, and it grew upon him to such an extent that he retired from active practice. He had formed many law partnerships in his time. There was Nash & Cushing, Nash & Hebard, Nash & Bradbury and perhaps others, the last partnership being with Judge D.W. Jones. All would testify to his great ability as a lawyer.
     For a year of more he seemed to suffer a gradual decline and was the object of tender solicitude upon the part of his wife and daughter. About four weeks ago he came in one day and seemed to collapse from sheer exhaustion. He felt, then, that the end had come and said so. Yet he seemed to have no particular disease. However, an obstruction developed rapidly in his esophagus, that prevented anything solid, and for the last few days, even water from entering his stomach and he passed away, really, from inanition.
     May peace and eternal joy be his.

[Note: He has a Grave Registration Card for Civi War soldiers.]

Gallipolis Daily Tribune
September 22, 1903
Transcribed by Henny Evans                                                                          Top of Page


Nash, William H.

Death of Gen. Wm. H. Nash
     General William H. Nash died at his home at Columbus, Tuesday, aged about 68 years, after an illness of several weeks. He was a son of the late Judge Simeon Nash and a nephew of the late William Nash and Samuel A. Nash
     He was appointed a captian [sic] of volunteers Nov 26, 1862, and was made a major in 1865 for distinguished gallantry. He entered the regular army with the rank of captain and rose through the grades until April 21, 1898, when he was made a brigadier general. He was retired at his own request May 8, 1898, being past the age of 62 years.
     Since that time he has made his home in Columbus. He was twice married. His first wife was Miss Susan Forsythe. His widow was formerly Mrs. Theodore Wilson.
     The remains arrived here Wednesday evening and were met by friends and by a detail from Company C and escorted to the residence of Mrs. Chas. D. Maxon. Thursday morning they were conveyed to the Presbyterian Church, escorted by C, where the funeral services were held, Rev. Dr. Palmer, assisted by Rev. E. H. Gelvin, officiating, the burial following at Pine Stret [sic] cemetery by Hayward & Son. A detail from Company C acted as pall bearers, and Messrs. Alfred Henking, W. H. Henking, George House and J. W. Gardener acted as an escort. Funeral services were also held in Columbus Wednesday morning and the remains were escorted from the residence to the station by the U. S. Regulars stationed at Columbus.

[Note: Per Soldiers & Sailors, Gen. William H. Nash served in Unit Co. H, 5th, O. V. I. He was born June 22, 1834 and died December 2, 1902.]

Gallipolis Bulletin
December 5, 1902
Transcribed by Karen Strojin                                                                          Top of Page


Neal, Elijah B.

E.B. Neal Dead
Was Father of G.E. Neal, A Local Insurance Man, Buried Tuesday
     Elijah B. Neal, prominent citizen of the Bladen community,died suddenly of heart trouble last Sunday morning, April 3, 1910. He was born in Fayette county, W.Va., April 20, 1840, and was married to Miss Louisa J. Lynch, Feb. 3, 1859. He was quartermaster in the Union Army at Charleston during the civil war and at the end of the great conflict settled at Swan Creek where he has since resided. He was the father of eight children of whom daughters, Mrs. Martha Davis, Mrs. Ida L. Donnally and son Gilbert E. Neal, survive him, besides his wife.
     He was a member of the Knights of Pythias, Knights of Golden Eagle, and was a member of Mt. Zion Baptist Church. He was a kind father, a good husband and citizen was respectedy all who knew him. The funeral was held Tuesday morning at Mt. Zion Baptist church in Waugh Bottom, by Rev. T.F. Carey of Greenfield, Ohio, burial following at the same place by Wetherholt under the auspices of the Golden Eagle.

Gallipolis Bulletin
April 8, 1910
Transcribed by Henny Evans

Neal, Elijah B.

     Elijah B. Neal, the venerable father [unreadable] E. Neal of this city died of [unreadable] trouble at Bladen Sunday morning. He had been in poor health [unreadable] June.
     Mr. Neal was born in Fayette Co., Ohio, April 20, 1840. He married Louisa Lynch Feb. 3, 1899.
After the war they settled at Swan Creek and lived in the county since, the past 24 years at Bladen. He was a farmer, merchant, postmaster for years, and was an exemplary husband, father, neighbor and citizen. He is survived by his wife and three children. Mrs. Martha Davis and Mrs. Ida Donnally, both of Bladen, and G. E. Neal.
     The funeral services were held at Mt. Zion Baptist Church of which the deceased had been a member since 1870, at 11 o'clock yesterday, Rev. T. F. Carey of Greenfield, O., officiating. Burial by Wetherholt under the auspices of the Knights of Pythias and Golden Eagles.

[Note: Died 1910 Mt Zion Ohio Twp]

Gallipolis paper
1910
Transcribed by Irene Blamer


Neal, James M.

Good Citizen Called
James M. Neal, Well Known Citizen of Swan Creek, Passed Away Sunday Night
     Mr. James M. Neal, a well known resident of this county, passed away Sunday night, April 30, 1922, about ten o'clock at his home at Swan Creek. He had been in failing health for some time. Mr. Neal was in his 77th year. He was a veteran of the Civil War, and was a man of splendid character, and was well liked and respected. His widow and four sons, Ira and Bert of Swan Creek, and Harry and Clyde of Gallipolis, survive him. The funeral was held at Mercerville Tuesday morning.

[Note: He served in Co. G, 1st Ohio Volunteer Heavy Artillery and is buried at Mercerville Cemetery in Guyan Township. b. 1834 d.1922]

Gallia Times
May 4, 1922
Transcribed by Henny Evans                                                                        Top of Page


Neal, James W.

James Neal Dead
     James W. Neal, aged about 75, and a well known resident of Wigner, this county, died suddenly of heart trouble Saturday evening about 9 o'clock. His funeral services were held Tuesday morning, interment following at Sandfork. Mr. Neal had been thrice married. His first wife was Miss Mary Frances White, daughter of the late Levi White of Walnut township. They became the parents of Mrs. Addie Willey of Illinois, Mrs. Richard Carter of Madison county, this state, T. L. Neal of London and E. Y. Neal of Lockbourne, Ohio. His second wife was Miss Myrtle Scurlock of Jackson County, who bore him no children. His third and surviving wife was Miss Etha Stewart, daughter of Squire Fred Stewart of Rio Grande. They became the parents of Orin, Vaughn, Fred Louise and Paul Neal. Mr. Neal was a soldier during the civil war. He was a life-long Methodist and a good citizen with many friends.

Gallipolis Bulletin
April 23, 1914

Neal, James

James Neal Dies
     James Neal, a farmer residing near Alexandria, died Saturday, aged 73. The funeral services were held Tuesday and he was laid to rest at Sandfork. He was a veteran of the Rebellion.
     He is survived by his third wife and a family of five. He was the father of Henry Neal, ex-groceryman of this city. Dallas D. Neal, the druggist among others of this city, attended the funeral. Last week the deceased received a visit from his father, Thomas Neal, a chipper young man of past 97.

[Note: James W. Neal served in Unit Co. E, 141st, O. V. I. Per Death Records Vol. II, he was born September 11, 1831 and died April 18, 1914 (per family stone he was born in 1839), His stone is located in Neal Cemetery, (Sandfork, per obituary), Walnut Township.]

Gallipolis Journal
April 24, 1914
Transcriptions by Karen Strojin


Neal, Robert D.

Methodist Minister Dead
     Rev. Robert D. Neal, assistant pastor of the Gift street M.E. church died at daybreak,Saturday morning from a complication of diseases. He is survived by his wife and seven children. The Rev. Mr. Neal was born in Gallia county and moved to Columbus about 12 years ago. For several years he was clerk of the courts in the county where he was born. He served three years in the Civil war as a member of the 91st O.V.I. and is a member of the McCoy post, G.A.R.

[Note: He is buried in Greenlawn Cemetery in Columbus, Ohio. February 4, 1844-December 15, 1906.]

Columbus paper
December 16/17, 1906
Transcribed by Henny Evans                                                                         Top of Page


Neal, Samuel F., Major

Last Rites for Major S.F. Neal to Be Sunday
Venerable Civil War Veteran and Prominent Citizen Had Record of Usefulness
     Major S.F. Neal, who passed away about noon Friday, Dec. 19, was a life long resident of Gallipolis and one of the the few remaining Civil war veterans in the city. Major Neal was the son of H.H. and Martha Neal, and had he lived until April 11, 1931, he would have been ninety years of age. His birth place was on Fourth avenue below Spruce street, but later the Neal homestead was on the site of the Park Central hotel and it is said the hotel was built around this old residence.
     Mr. Neal was educated at the Gallia Academy under the supervision of A.G. Sears. For several years he was associated in the dry goods business with his father in the building now occupied by the Fontana fruit store. In 1861, he was among those who dropped business pursuits and answered the bugle call that made him forever one of the gallant and revered defenders of his country, as a first lieutenant in Co. A, 91st O.V.I. under John A. Turley, participating in numerous skirmishes and the battles of Cedar Creek, Lynchburg, Cloyd Mountain and Winchester. A kind Providence held its protecting hand over him and he returned from the war unscathed. In the meantime he was promoted to a captaincy and later to major of his regiment. He was commander of the G.A.R. post for many years and was always interested in all their affairs.
     In 1879 he was appointed post master, serving as such eight years. In 1887 he remodeled the Anchor Mills putting in a roller system which proved quite successful. During the later part of his life he conducted a feed store on Vine street. His eyesight and hearing being much impaired he was forced to retire from business in 1925. In the last few years with all his afflictions he was patient and cheerful and kept an interest in the affairs of the day through the eyes of his devoted wife.
     Mr. Neal was the last of his family, and is survived only by his wife, who as Luella Hibbard was joined to him in marriage in 1868. Their two sons, Henry and Albert, preceded their father in death. W.N. Hayward of this city, is a nephew, and Mrs. Alice Anderson of Ironton, a niece.
     Funeral services will be held Sunday afternoon at 2 o'clock at his late home by Rev. Wood Duff of the Presbyterian church, of which he was a member. Burial in Mound Hill cemetery under the direction of W.N. Hayward.

Gallipolis Daily Tribune
December 20, 1930
Transcribed by Henny Evans                                                                        Top of Page


Neal, Thomas H.

Thomas H. Neal Died At Ironton Thursday, April 14, Of Heart Trouble
Was Former Gallia County Boy and Practiced Law Here
     Attorney Thomas H. Neal, who was seized with a severe attack of organic heart trouble early in the week and lay for many hours in a state of coma, passed to the Great Beyond Thursday evening, shortly after six o'clock, aged sixty-four years.
     Thomas H. Neal was born in Gallia County, Nov. 14, 1846 and spent most of his life in the county of his birth, residing there until about ten years ago, when he moved to Ironton.
     When Lincoln issued his call for soldiers, Mr. Neal was among the first to respond and joined Co. G, 1st. O.V.I. serving his country with honor to it and himself until honorably discharged. After the war he returned to Gallipolis where he took up the study of law and being of an unusually bright mind, quickly fitted himself for his chosen profession and was admitted to the bar. After moving to Ironton, Mr. Neal continued the practice of his profession and after the death of Squire Corn was appointed to fill the vacancy and served out the unexpired term.
     The deceased was a man possessed of an unusually bright mind and the happy faculty of seeing the cheerful side of life and his witty brilliant remarks will long be remembered by his host of friends who all sincerely regret his demise. Of a most kindly disposition he made friends of all and many a heart will be saddened when the news of his death becomes generally known. It was at his home however, where he will be missed the greatest for he was a most kind and indulgent husband and father. The deceased was married three times, his first wife being Miss Martha Eacer. To this union one child was born, Earnest Neal, who is entering school in North Carolina, survive.
     The funeral services were held at 2 o'clock Sunday afternoon at the late residence, Rev. T.R. Watson of Wesley Church, officiating. Internment was at Woodland under the auspices of Dick Lambert Post G.A.R.

[Note: Death Certificate shows parents as Watson and Allison Neal]

Gallipolis Paper
April 22, 1910
Transcribed by F.K. Brown                                                                             Top of Page


Needham, Alfred R.

Taps Sound For Alfred Needham
Good Man and Old Soldier
     Alfred R. Needham died Tuesday afternoon, Jan. 16, 1917, after an illness of four weeks with heart trouble.
     Mr. Needham was for many years superintendent of street works, a position he looked after faithfully.
He was a son of the late Dr. Henry and Margaret Needham and was married to Miss Sarah Russell of Porter 52 years ago. The wife and one son, Wm. H. Needham, a well known newspaper man, now of Williamson, W. Va., survive. Other relatives living are a niece, Miss Cora Saxton of Huntington, and a nephew, Benjamin Saxton of Akron.
     Mr. Needham at one time resided at East Liverpool, but had lived in Gallipolis and Gallia county for 51 years. He had been a member of the Christian Church for 41 years and was a Civil War veteran serving his country for four years as a member of Co. I, 4th Regiment, W. Va., Infantry, from which he received an honorable discharge. He was a good citizen, highly respected, and his death will be regretted by all of his acquaintances.
     The funeral will be conducted by Rev. J. O. Newton at the home at 2:30 p. m. today. Burial by Wetherholt at Pine street.

Gallipolis Journal
January 18, 1917


Needham, Alfred R.

Old Soldier Passes
     Mr. Alfred R. Needham, a resident of this county for more than 50 years, died at his home in this city on Tuesday evening of last week after four weeks' illness. He is survived by his wife, formerly Miss Sarah Russell of Porter, and a son, Will Needham a newspaper man of Williamson, W. Va. Mr. Needham served four years during the war in the Fourth West Virginia Infantry, and was a fine old gentleman.
     The funeral was Thursday at his late home by Rev. Newton, interment following in Pine street cemetery.

[Note: Per Soldiers & Sailors, Alfred R. Needham served in Co. I, 4th, Wv. I, and in Co. I, 173rd, O. V. I. Per death certificate, he was born September 9, 1835 and died January 16, 1917. His stone is located in Pine Street Cemetery.]

Gallia Times
January 24, 1917
Transcriptions by Karen Strojin                                                                       Top of Page


Needham, W. C. H.

Death of Hon. W. C. H. Needham
     In last week's issue we announced the dangerous illness of State Senator W. C. H. Needham, at Columbus. He died on Thursday morning, January 12, at 3 o'clock, and that evening at 9 o'clock his remains reached Gallipolis, in charge of a Committee of Senators and Representatives composed of the following gentlemen: Senators Pollard, Hartshorn, Dickinson, White, Foresman, and Myers, and Representatives Beman, Strong, Ellsworth, Jones, of Jackson, Coryell and McFarland. Messrs. Smith and Glenn, of the Clerk's office of the State Senate, accompanied the Committee. A Committee from Morning Dawn Lodge, No. 7, F. & A. M., received the remains at the depot and escorted them to the family residence on Front Street, and the Lodge remained in charge until the funeral services were closed.
     The funeral was announced for 2 o'clock Sunday afternoon. There was a large outpouring of the people, and the spacious residence and grounds were crowded with friends. The Masons had charge of the funeral. Rev. Breare conducted the religious services. A special train brought representatives of the Masonic Lodges of Pomeroy, Middleport and Cheshire, Ohio, and Clifton, West Virginia. The pall bearers were all physicians as well as Masons.
     The Gallipolis Volunteer Fire Department attended the funeral in a body and in uniform. The music was furnished by the Gallipolis City Band. The funeral cortege was imposing. Although the weather was threatening, the streets were thronged, and the old cemetery crowded with sympathizing friends.
     Dr. Needham was in his thirty-seventh year at the time of his death. He was born in Massachusetts, and was a son of Colonel Daniel Needham, who for years past has been a Bank Examiner. When a boy, aged sixteen, Dr. Needham enlisted as a private in the 60th Massachusetts Infantry Volunteers. Soon after the war, he went to Wisconsin. Desiring a milder climate he came to Gallipolis in 1869, and entered upon the practice of his profession. In 1870 he married Florence, a daughter of the late Charles Henking, and granddaughter of the late Charles Creuzet. About the year 1875, finding that his health was failing, he purchased a home in Jacksonville, Florida, where he spent the winters (with perhaps one exception) with his family. His wife and two children survive him.
     He served for a short time as member of the City Council of Gallipolis, and during the past two years has been Chairman of the Republican Central Committee of Gallia County. He was nominated last fall by his party for the State Senate and elected. On the 15th of December he left with his family for Columbus--just four weeks before the day on which his remains were brought home, and one month before the day of his funeral. He was quite sick on the Sunday preceding the meeting of the Senate, but on Monday attended, was sworn in and took his seat. He was again present on Tuesday, but was compelled by his illness to leave his seat, and never returned.
     He grew rapidly worse, and it was soon seen that he could not recover. His wife and brother-in-law, Mr. C. W. Henking, were with him constantly. Messrs. Joseph Stafford and Wm. Nash were with him for several days before his death, and Dr. Mills visited him.
     About 30 minutes before his death, Mr. Henking raised him in bed to relieve his difficult breathing; but it availed nothing, and he sank back, saying, "Gone! absolutely gone!" These were his last words, and he died calmly and peacefully.

[Note: Hon. W. C. H. Needham was born August 18, 1845 and died January 12, 1882.]

Gallipolis Bulletin
January 17, 1882
Transcribed by Karen Strojin                                                                          Top of Page

Needham, Dr. William C. H.

City Councilman and State Senator – Dr. William C. H. Needham
     Senator W.C. H. Needham, representing the Eighth Senatorial District in the State Senate, died at the residence of Mr. West, 305 East Broad street, at three o’clock yesterday morning, the disease being of a pulmonary character. The second day after the Legislature convened Senator Needham left his place in the Senate, feeling ill, and never returned, being confined to his room in the meantime, most of the time to his bed. Everything that medical skill could do to minister to his wants was done. In addition to the presence of his family and medical aid, Mr. Joseph Stafford, Auditor of Gallia County, and Mr. William Nash, editor the Gallipolis Journal, came to Columbus January 10 to render any assistance that might properly be tendered by personal friends of deceased. On account of weak lungs the deceased (a physician by profession) had not been in active practice for several years, but, being well fixed financially, spent the winter in Florida. Although weak, he expected in coming to Columbus to be able to perform his duties in the Senate.
     The deceased was born in Massachusetts. When a boy, aged sixteen, the late Senator ran off from home to go into the army. This was during the late war. He volunteered and served as a private through the war in the Sixtieth Massachusetts infantry. His age at his death was about thirty-five. Soon after the war he went to make his home in Wisconsin, but, concluding to seek a warmer climate, came to Southern Ohio, settling at Gallipolis. He married a native of Gallipolis, a lady of French descent. Before being elected to the State Senate, he had been a member of the City Council of Gallipolis and Chairman of the Republic committee of Gallia county.
     The proceedings in the Senate and House in reference to the death of the Senator appear elsewhere in this paper. At 2 p.m. the members of the House and Senate proceeded in a body to Broad and Seventh streets for the purpose of accompanying the remains to the depot. Quite a number of citizens and friends had gathered at the residence, among the number being Mrs. Gov. Foster, daughter Annie and Private Secretary Mussey. The members made quite an imposing appearance as they passed down High street to the depot. The remains were taken away on the Hocking Valley train to Gallipolis, where the funeral will take place next Sunday. The vacant desk and chair in the Senate will be draped in mourning. --(Columbus Journal, Friday)
     Upon arrival of the remains here the legislative committee departed and the Masonic Lodge of this city took charge, and continued to do so until after burial. Dr. Needham’s sister and her husband, of Massachusetts, arrived on Saturday. The Doctor’s father was unable to be present. A special train from Pomeroy arrived at one o’clock Sunday with Masons and friends on board. The former united with Morning Dawn Lodge, F. & A.M., and repaired to the residence of the deceased where appropriate funeral services were dispensed by Rev. Father Breare. The pall bearers were Drs. Sanns, Alcorn, Johnson, Hysell, Huff and Saunders. The remains were interred at the old cemetery, a large concourse of friends paying the last, sad tribute.
     In this connection a short history of the disceased [sic] is appropriate. He was born in Groton, Mass., in the year 1845, and was 36 years old when he died. While a boy he worked on a farm. He entered Norwich (Vt.) University, but left it when the war broke out, joining the 60th Mass. Regt. Serving out his term he returned to same College and graduated. Afterward he graduated at the Jefferson and a Massachusetts Medical College. He came to Gallipolis, upon the invitation of Dr. Livesay, in 1869, and afterwards married Miss Henking, who with two children survives him. He was member of this City Council a short time in 1872, but resigned because he could not hold it and also U.S. Pension Examining Surgeon. He was also Chairman of the Gallia County Republican Central Committee. He was the owner of considerable real estate in this city, and among it is a beautiful home. Dr. Needham was of a happy, good disposition and was kind and charitable. He had many warm, true friends. He was honest and truthful. Peace forever to his manes.

Gallipolis Journal,
January 19, 1882
Transcribed by William L. Needham


Nessel, William R.

     William R. Nessel was born about 1838 to Daniel and Rosetta Palmer Nessel. He enlisted in Co. H, 47th Ohio Volunteer Infantry and also served in Co. B of the same unit. He died of disease November 13, 1862 at the Gallipolis Field Hospital and is buried in an Unknown Soldier grave in Pine Street Cemetery. His obituary was in the Monroe Commercial, Monroe County, Michigan but a copy can not be found.

Obit constructed from service records and mother's obit
Monroe Democrat
November 14, 1892 (Rosetta Nessel)
Constructed by Henny Evans


Newland, John

Death of an Old Soldier
     John Newland, an old soldier living on 4th avenue above Pine died Saturday afternoon at one o'clock, Oct. 19th, 1912, of pneumonia in the 77th year of his age. He was a widower and left one son. He belonged to the 33rd O. V. I. in Col. Montgomery's company. His funeral services and burial were held Monday afternoon at St. Nicholas Church beyond Yellow Town by Wetherholt.

[Note: John Newland was born November 17, 1835.]

Gallipolis Journal
October 22, 1912
Transcribed by Karen Strojin                                                                          Top of Page


Nibert, Hugh

Hugh Nibert, Aged Civil War Veteran Dead
     Mr. Hugh Nibert, aged 83, a Civil War Veteran, and foster father of Mr. John Haner of this city, died at Eureka Thursday evening, Nov. 12, 1925, at 7:30 after a short illness. He had been in good health up to a few days before death. Funeral Sunday morning at 11 o'clock at Providence church. Undertaker Stevers will be in charge of burial.
     Mr. Nibert was a well known and highly esteemed resident and farmer of Gallia county. He was a Mason and that lodge will have charge of the obsequies.
     Mr. Nibert was for several years quite prominent in Republican politics in his locality and had many friends who will regret to hear of his death.

[Note: He served in Co.H & I, 36th O.V.I.]

Gallipolis Daily Tribune
November 13, 1925
Transcribed by Henny Evans


Nibert, John W.

Obituary
     John W. Nibert, born February 10, 1838, died December 30, 1925, aged 87 years, 20 months and 20 days. Early in life he was converted, joined the Mt. Zion Baptist Church, and lived a consistent christian life. He was a gentleman in every sense of the word, charitable, loving and kind; as a citizen his sterling worth and example was ever deemed commendable and worthy of emulation.
     We cannot but feel how inadiquate are words to express our loss of Mr. Nibert, who has lived the year of allotted time to him here below well and done good in his day and generation until God called him to a higher sphere.
     He was united in marriage to Miss Elizabeth Evans on May 17th, 1860, who preceded him in death May 19, 1901. To this union was born thirteen children, seven of whom preceded him to the great beyond. The surviving are: Mrs. Mary Irwin, James M. and O. W. Nibert, of Bladen, John, of Lancaster, ohio, W. O. Nibert of Gallipolis, Ohio and Mrs. Maude Saunders of Northup, Ohio.
     He was a member of Sunny Side Castle No. 81, K. G. E. of Crown City, Ohio. He was also, a member of Company "F" 78th. Regiment Ohio, Volunteer Infantry and served his Country with full honor till the close of the war in 1865.
     On Sunday evening December 27, the angel of death swooped down and laid his finger on the feeble form of the aged soldier, and he lingered until 12:30 Wednesday, and then quietly passed away, to be with the great majority of his old conrades in arms on the other shore. His loss will be keenly felt, but no where as in the home.
     He was a true father to his children, and no one so much as they will realize the bitterness of the sorrow which only the christian faith can prevent one from murmering and asking, "Why was it sent." We can only say to the children, as has been said to us:

"Grieve not so much for some one who has died,
That over thy neglect the living weep;
Love well the ones that linger at the side;
How multiplied thy sorrows when they sleep."
    A Friend

[Note: Stevers Funeral Home - Bethel Cemetery, Ohio Twp; The 78th OVI roster shows him to have been in Company H rather than Company F.]

Gallipolis paper
December 30, 1925
Transcribed by Maxine Marshall     

Nibert, John

     John Nibert, 88, died Dec. 30 at his home at Bladen. He leaves sons Orlando, Othneil, James and John,
and daughters, Mrs. Maude Saunders and Mrs. Mary Irwin. Mr. Nibert was a good citizen with many friends. The funeral was on New Year's day at Bethel church.

Gallipolis paper [no date available]
Transcribed by Maxine Marshall                                                                       Top of Page 


Niday, Franklin D.

Death of Franklin D. Niday
     Mr. F. D. Niday died last Saturday morning after a long and painful illness with cancer of the stomach.
Deceased was a veteran of the civil war, having been a member of the 141st Regiment, O. V. I. He was also a member of the Leaper Post, G. A. R. He was an honest, upright citizen, and his death will be deplored.
     He left a wife and the following children: Prof. Will Niday, Victor, Pearl, Chauncy, Teresa, and Mrs. Blanche Russell. He also left the following brothers and sisters: Azee, in Dawson, Alaska; Robert, of Oklohoma [sic]; Oliver, of Nebraska; J. P. Niday, of this city; Mrs. Jos. Short, of Huntington; Mrs. James Robinson, of Leaper; Mrs. Lester Henshaw, of this city, and Mrs. Isaac Boster, Hilton, O.

[Note: Franklin D. Niday was born December 19, 1840 and died December 7, 1901. His stone (F. D. Niday) is located in Mound Hill Cemetery.]

Gallipolis Bulletin
December 13, 1901
Transcribed by Karen Strojin


Niday, Harvey

     Brother of Capt. James E., Stephen and John L., all four brothers served in Co. B, 91st Ohio Volunteer Infantry. Harvey died at the battle of Opequan, Virginia on September 19, 1864. He was born about 1839 and is buried at Mercerville Cemetery in Guyan Township.

Compiled from Official Roster and brothers' obits which are on the website
Henny Evans                                                                                                 Top of Page


Niday, Captain James E.

     DIED - At Fayetteville, West Virginia, on the 21st inst., Captain James E. Niday, Co. B, 91st Ohio Volunteer Infantry.

Gallipolis Journal
April 25, 1864
Transcribed by F.K. Brown


Niday, James E.

Gallipolis Division,
No. T & S, of T.
April 23rd. 1864

     We the undersigned your committee appointed to draft suitable resolutions expressive of the sense of this Division upon the death of our beloved Brother James E. Niday beg leave to submit the following resolution:

1st. Resolved that this division have learned with regret of the death of our esteemed Brother James E. Niday.
2nd. Resolved that in the death of our esteemed Brother our Government has lost a faithful and valued officer the community an exemplary citizen, the church a worthy and consistent member the cause of Temperance a faithful friend and this Division one of its brightest ornaments.
3rd. Resolved that while we submit in resignation to Divine Will, the heartfelt sympathies of this Division are hereby respectfully tendered to the Parents and relatives of our deceased Brother.
4th. Resolved that the Division Room be draped in mourning and that the Brothers wear the usual badge of mourning for thirty days.
5th. Resolved that a copy of these resolutions be furnished by the R. S. to the Gallipolis Journal and Democratic Dispatch for publication and that a copy of the same be transmitted by him to the Parents of our deceased Brother.
C. J. Menager.
Geo. W. Heaton.
L. J. Langley.
Committee.

     The foregoing resolutions were unanimously adopted by Gallipolis Division No. 74 Sons of Temperance.
A. L. Langley, R. S.

     By the death of Capt. Niday his relatives and many personal friends have sustained an irreparable loss. Our county loses one of her best citizens, and the public service, a most faithful and efficient officer. Death truly found "a shining mark" in the person of this young man. Beloved by all who knew him, the news of his death has cast a gloom over our community which plainly tells how highly he was appreciated.
     In the fall of 1862 Capt. Niday commenced to recruit a company for three years or during the war. Although a very young man without any military experience, or influential friends, he succeeded in raising a company to the maximum number and was obliged to refuse many who offered to join it. His previously well established reputation for piety, honor and gentlemanly deportment, was a powerful advocate in his favor, and induced many fathers and mothers to entrust their sons to his care. How well he executed this trust, is seen in the good order and soldier like bearing of his company. His men were his brothers in arms; and whilst maintaining his self respect and demanding from all obedience to orders, his kind solicitude for their comfort and happiness was the cause of their steady devotion and love for him as a commander.
     Thus has fallen another victim to this terrible rebellion. None more worthy to live and enjoy a long life in this world, and probably few better prepared to enjoy the bliss of the next. His memory will long live in the hearts of the grateful people, and as the Spring flowers bloom over his grave, the grief and anguish of his loving friends will be soothed by the reflection, that in all respects he followed his mission, and died as he lived the worthy citizen, conscientious christian, and devoted patriot.
Peace to his ashes!
ED. JOURNAL

[Note: James E. Niday served in Co. B, 91st, O. V. I. His stone is located in Mercerville Cemetery, Guyan Township.]

Gallipolis Journal
April 28, 1864
Transcribed by Karen Strojin                                                                          Top of Page


Niday, John L.

John Niday Dead
     John L. Niday, in his 86th year, passed away Saturday at his home in Harrison township, following an attack of paralysis. His wife died some 25 years ago, and he made his home with his sons William and David. Other surviving children are Mrs. Lucy Queen of Ashville, North Carolina, James Edward Niday of Nashville, Tenn., and Charles Niday of Cleveland.
     Mr. Niday was a member of Company--B, 91st Ohio, during the civil war. His brother, Harry W., was killed at Winchester, and Stephen Niday, also of the same company died here last summer.
     The funeral was Monday at Bethesda in Walnut township by Rev. J. W. McConnell, interment at the same place by Undertaker Tope.

[Note: John L. Niday served in Unit Co. B, 91st, O. V. I. Per family stone, he was born March 8, 1834 and died December 20, 1919. His stone is located in Bethesda Cemetery, Walnut Township.]

Gallia Times
December 24, 1919
Transcribed by Karen Strojin


Niday, Stephen E.

S. E. Niday Dead
     Stephen E. Niday, a civil war veteran, died Saturday, May 24, 1919, at his home in this city aged 78 years.
He was formerly a resident of Walnut township, but moved to the city some time since. A daughter, Miss Jessie, and six sons, James, Chauncey, Homer, Obediah, Elmer and Frank survive him.
     The funeral was held Monday at his late home by Rev. D. F. Wood, interment following in Mound Hill cemetery.

[Note: Stephen E. Niday served in Unit Co. B, 91st, O. V. I. Per his, and family stone, he was born February 17, 1841. His obituary says interment in Mound Hill Cemetery, but his stone is located in Bethesda Cemetery, Walnut Township.]

The Gallia Times
Wednesday, May 28, 1919
Transcribed by Karen Strojin


Noel, Edward E.

EDWARD E. NOEL
April 6, 1863, Edward E. Noel, in the 25th. year of his age
     Edward was a truly sober-minded young man. His gentle and amiable disposition greatly endeared him to all who knew him. Obedient to his parents, he was none the less obedient to the call of his country and cheerfully left the comforts of home to share the hardships that those true patriots endure, who fight the battles of freedom against treason and oppression.
     He enlisted in Company I, 18th. Regiment under Captain Ross. He remained in the service nineteen months, during which time he was in several skirmishes, in one of which he was severely wounded. This was in the fierce onset of his Company to gain possession of a stockade, which was accomplished. So severe was his wound he was deemed unfit for service and a discharge was tendered him which he refused. After partial recovery he rejoined his regiment, just in time to participate in the bloody fight at Murfreesboro. The exposure and fatigue of that protracted struggle proved too much for his powers of physical endurance, and he was soon prostrated by disease. After lying some time in the hospital, he found his recovery doubtful and finally accepted a discharge from the service and in an almost helpless condition, started for home and friends. A special providence seemed to have favored him.
     He felt when far away that he was unprepared to die. He longed for the counsel and prayers of a particular friend in whom he had all confidence and who, he thought could point him to the Lamb of God which taketh away the sins of the world. There he thought, if he could only arrive he would be enabled to rejoice in a Savior's love. There he did arrive when life's "fitful fever" was almost over. There he met the object of his heart's desire. There he was enabled to trust the Redeemer and realize that he was indeed a new creature through faith in the blood of the atonement. After a day and night were past, after offering an earnest prayer for his companions in arms, he enlisted in that war where there is no discharge. Earnestly may we breathe the prayer, that all who fall in the great struggle for life of the nation, may fall like Edward Noel. Friends may weep but their tears will fall on a patriot and a Christian's grave.

J.W.M.

Gallipolis Journal
April 16, 1863 (Vol. XXXIII No. 21)
Transcribed by F.K. Brown                                                                             Top of Page


Nolan, David

Civil War Veteran Dies
     David Nolan, age 86 years, civil war veteran, died at the home of his son, Allen Nolan, at Bidwell, January 8. He leaves five children, Mrs. George Lane, John Nolan and Mrs. Gillroy Lane, all of Bladen, Mrs. Dennis Haner, Crown City and Allen Nolan of Bidwell. His wife preceded him in death several years ago. Funeral services were held at Swan Creek Chapel by Rev. Earl Cremeens. Burial in church cemetery.

[Note: He served in Co. B, 173rd Ohio Volunteer Infantry. Dates on stone, 1845-1932.]

Gallipolis Tribune
January 1932
Transcribed by Henny Evans


North, James

Jas. North Dead
Well Known Citizen Passes Away Tuesday Evening From Heart Trouble
     James North, one of the city's well-known residents, died at his home on the corner of Fourth and Vine at 9:30 o'clock Tuesday night. He had long suffered from heart trouble and during the last few weeks his condition was such as to permit but little hope for his recovery. He had wonderful vitality, however, and in the years gone by was a man of great physical strength and endurance. This is the third death in the North family in less than six months. Mr. North's youngest son, John A. (Buck) North, died March 6, and Mrs. Floyd Irion, a daughter died August 5.
     James North was born in Richmond, Va., May 5, 1840, and was therefore in his 80th year. On June 24, 1863, he entered the Union army, becoming a member of Company D, 171 Regiment West Virginia Cavalry, and received an honorable discharge at Charleston Aug. 1, 1865, when the war had closed. Prior to the war he had served in the National Guards.
     While yet a soldier he married Adele Donnett of this city in 1864. From then to his death Gallipolis was his home and here he reared a large family. He is survived by his wife and the following children: William F. and Charles North, Gallipolis; Mrs. Ed Elswick, Caldwell, O.; Mrs. Sherman Jacox, Clarksburg, W. Va.; Mrs Fannie Kraus and Mrs. Homer Beck, Gallipolis. The decedent was intensely devoted to his family and home and his love and devotion were repaid and reciprocated in fullest measure. His death takes from the First Ward one of its most familiar, rugged and picturesque figures. Two brothers also survive Mr. North--David North of Huntington and Andy North, who lives on Sixteen Creek.
     The funeral services will be held Fri. afternoon. Burial at Mound Hill.

Gallipolis Bulletin
August 21, 1919


North, James R.

James North Dead
     James R. North, 79, a Civil War veteran and for many years a resident of this city, passed away last Tuesday night after long illness from heart trouble. He is survived by his wife and children, Mrs. Fannie Kraus, Mrs. Homer Beck, Will and Charles North, Mrs. Sherley Jacox of Clarksburg, W. Va., Mrs. Minnie Elswick of Caldwell, Ohio, and brothers David of Huntington and Andrew of Kanawha. He was a member of the M. E. Church and the G. A. R.
     The funeral was from his late home Friday afternoon.

[Note: James R. North died August 19, 1919. Per his stone he served in Co. D, 7th, Wv. C., per his obituary he served in Unit Co. D, 171st, Wv. C.]

The Gallia Times
August 27, 1919
Transcriptions by Karen Strojin                                                                      Top of Page


Northup, Henry Clay

Civil War Veteran Dead
Henry Clay Northup, One of Few Survivors of Andersonville
     Henry Clay Northup, one of the very few survivors of the horrible Andersonville prison, passed away at 6:55 o'clock Monday evening, July 3, 1923, at his home in Thivenir, aged 80 years, ten months and twenty days. With his passing, comrades of the rebellion along with hosts of friends and admirers, keenly mourn their loss.
     Mr. Northup, while serving the country through the entire conflict with the 7th Ohio Cavalry, was captured at Rogersville, East Tenn., Nov. 6, 1863. He was taken to Andersonville prison where he served a time and then was transferred to Florence, S.C., being exchanged later in the war. The aged veteran was a member of one of Gallia's most respected and prominent families and a member of Rose Commandery No. 43.
     The surviving relatives are: his widow, Mrs. Elizabeth Gillingham Northup and one daughter, Mrs. Joe Cottrell.
     The funeral, which will be held at one o'clock Wednesday afternoon at Yellowtown church, will be under the auspices of the Knight Templars and will be conducted by Rev. Mr. Ewing. Burial will follow at St. Nicholas cemetery by G.J. Wetherholt & Son.

Gallipolis Daily Tribune
July 4, 1923
Transcribed by Henny Evans


Nowlin, Ellis

Death Of Ellis Nowlin
     Mr. Ellis Nowlin, of Ohio Township, 75 years old, died Thursday about half past one in the afternoon.  He had not been well for a few days, says Mr. Wayne Lanier, who lives close by, and Thursday afternoon after eating his dinner, he went to Mr. Lanier's and went to the cistern, where Willie Lanier and Mrs. C. W. Lanier were trying to get a bucket out of the cistern. They noticed him creel over, and they went to him and asked him what was the matter. He said that he felt blind. They notified his wife and got some help and assisted him to the bed in Willie's house and aided him in every way, but he gradually sunk into unconsciousness and passed away in a few minutes. His funeral services will be conducted by Mount Zion Saturday at 10 A. M. by the D. L. Morton G. A. R., Rev. T. F. Cary of Rio Grande, preaching the sermon.  He was born in the neighborhood where he died. Was a Soldier in Company B, in the 193rd Regiment and a good citizen every way.  He leaves a second wife (Jane Wray) and two children by his first wife, Amos and Gallatin, and two brothers and one sister, the latter of Lawrence County.

Gallipolis Daily Tribune
Volume IX
Number 140
June 10, 1898
Gallipolis, Ohio

Transcribed by: MLT


Nowlin, Ellis

Nowlin
     Mr. Ellis Nowlin, Of Ohio Tp., this county, died very suddenly Thursday afternoon, June 9, 1898. Heart disease is supposed to be the cause of his death. He was born May 5, 1823. He was united in marriage to Miss Sallie A. Saunders, and after her death took as a second wife Jane Wray, who, besides two children by his first wife and two brothers and one sister survive him. He served in the civil war, being a member of Co. B, 193rd Regiment. He was a member of the Baptist Church, and a man held in the highest esteem by all who knew him. The funeral and burial occurred at Mt. Zion on last Saturday morning, at 10 o'clock, Rev. T. F. Cary, officiating, with burial in charge of Wetherholt.

Gallipolis Bulletin
June 18, 1898
Transcribed by Karen Strojin

Nowlin, Ellis

Death of Ellis Nowlin
     Ellis Nowlin, aged seventy-five, and one of the pioneers of this county, passed to his long home Thursday evening at 1:30 o'clock. His death occurred under rather peculiar circumstances. He lived in Rose Bud and had been in moderately good health until a few days since, when he was taken sick after walking a long journey to church. Dr Fletcher attended him and advised him to keep quiet a few days.
     As there are several neighbors living near Mr. Nowlin was in the habit of going about from house to house to pass away the lonely hours. On Thursday, after eating a hearty dinner, he walked up the hill from his home to that of W.A. Lanier to get a cool drink of water. He had only reached the cistern when he fell on the platform apparently exhausted. Mr. Lanier and some others who were near by saw him fall and ran to his assistance. He was carried to the home of Mr. Lanier where he expired in a few minutes and shortly after his companion had been called to his bedside. Heart disease is supposed to have caused his death.
     Deceased was born in this county May 5, 1823, and has always lived in about the same neighborhood in which he died. He was twice married, his first was Sally A. Saunders and his second Jane Wray. Besides his companion he leaves behind one sister, Mrs. Josephine Thacker, of Lawrence county, and three brothers, one living in New York and the other two somewhere in the west. He paid his sister a visit a few weeks ago, the first time in several years, and had heard nothing from either of his brothers for some time.
     He was a member of the Baptist church for 52 years and lived an upright honorable life always trying to do good to his fellow man. For several years he held the office of deacon in the Mt. Zion church and the position left vacant by his death will be hard to fill. He was known far and near as a great church exhorter and few are the churches in the lower part of Gallia county whose walls have not re-echoed his voice in pointing sinners the way heavenward. He was an earnest worker in the church and has assisted his different pastors in immersing several hundred converts. Deacon Nowlin will be sadly missed by a large circle of friends, and no doubt for years to come his fervent prayers will be ringing in their ears.
     He was a soldier in the civil war, being in Co. B, 193rd Regiment and for several years has been favored by the Government with a pension to comfort his declining years. He was considered a good soldier and took great interest in the trouble with Spain and was glad to know that there are plenty of brave boys to take his place while his warfare is o'er.
     His funeral occurred at Mt. Zion Saturday, at 10 a.m., Rev. T.F. Carey conducting the same. The G.A.R. with undertaker Wetherholt had charge of the burial.

Gallipolis Journal
June 14, 1898
Transcribed by Henny Evans


Null, W. F.

Mr. W. F. Null Dead
     Mr. W. F. Null died at his home on upper Fourth avenue Monday, March 8, 1909, after an illness of one week with intestinal grip.
     Mr. Null was 69 years of age. He was married to Miss Rebecca Brown, of Walnut township, in 1858. In 1852 (1862) he enlisted in the Civil war under Capt. Gatewood in the First Ohio Heavy Artillery. He was a very nice old christian gentleman and well liked by all who knew him. He and family moved to Gallipolis 19 years ago and he kept a grocery for some-time, but when taken ill, was employed at Factory D of the furniture factory.
     Besides his wife he is survived by five children, Mrs. L. W. Burnett, Mrs. W. H. Gardner, Mrs. E. E. Cherrington, W. H. Null and James F. Null, all of this city; also three half-brothers, David and Aaron Coffman, of Gallia County, and Francis, of Charleston, and one half-sister, Mrs. Elizabeth Pyles, of Ironton.
     His funeral services were conducted at his late home Wednesday afternoon by Rev. A. P. Cherrington and the interment followed by Wetherholt at the Pine street cemetery.

[Note: W. F. Null served in Unit Co. G, 1st, O. H. A. He was born in 1840, and his stone is located in Pine Street Cemetery.]

Gallipolis Bulletin
March 12, 1909
Transcribed by Karen Strojin                                                                              Top of Page


Odell, Ephraim

     Ephraim Odell, enlisted from Green township as a substitute, in Co. F, 29th Reg't. O.V.I. October 12th, 1864, and died in Hospital at Savannah, Georgia, of chronic diarrhea Feb. 2, 1864, aged 18.

[Note: His name was found in a list of soldiers who died in the war. His mother got his pension. Another date of death is given as February 1, 1865 and he is buried at Savannah, Georgia. The name was also spelled Ephram Odell on military records. The 1865 date is undoubtedly correct since the 29th OVI was part of Sherman's March through Georgia and the Savannah area was their location in January of 1865.]

Gallipolis Journal
November 9, 1865
Transcribed by Eva Swain Hughes


Oiler, James

Death of James Oiler
     James Oiler, one of the Civil War veterans and a highly respected citizen of Ewington, died Monday evening from the effects of a paralytic stroke which he suffered on Saturday, never regaining consciousness after being stricken.
     The funeral service was held yesterday at the M.E. church at Ewington, burial following at the Franklin cemetery. A more extended account of his life will appear in next week's issue.

Gallipolis Daily Tribune
June 25, 1907
Transcribed by Henny Evans

Death of James Oiler
     Mr. James Oiler of near Ewington was stricken with paralysis last Saturday while working in his corn and died Monday, June 24, at the age of about 78 years. The funeral services were held at the M.E. Church Wednesday, interment following at Franklin cemetery.

[Note: The dates on his stone are December 13, 1828-June 24, 1907. He served in Co. A, 27th Ohio Volunteer Infantry.]

Gallipolis Bulletin
June 28, 1907
Transcribed by Henny Evans                                                                           Top of Page


Olmstead, J. D.

Death of J.D. Olmstead
     J. D. Olmstead died at the residence of his daughter, Mrs. J. H. Irwin of Springfield Township at 3 o'clock Monday morning. He was 79 years of age last April and had been an invalid for some time. A number of years ago he was editor of the Tribune and on disposing of his interests in that paper went to California. He returned to this county about a month ago with Mrs. Irwin, after the death of his wife. He was a splendid man and when a resident of this city, had hosts of friends.

[Note: J. D. Olmstead served in Unit Co. E, 151st., O. V. I. (1890 C). Per Death Records Vol. II, he was born April 9, 1833 and died June 3, 1912. His stone is located in Clark Chapel Cemetery.]

Gallipolis Bulletin
June 6, 1912
Transcribed by Karen Strojin


Oney, John

John Oney Dead
     Mr. John Oney passed away at his home near Gallia, this county, on Feb. 24, 1922, aged 87 years, 2 months and 20 days. He was born in Miami County, Ohio, on Nov. 28, 1834.
     Mr. Oney was married to Rebecca Jones in September, 1858, and to them were born nine children, five of whom survive. They are Flora Handley of Wellston, Mrs. Alice Hedding of Lawrence Furnace, Ohio, Mrs. Blanche Armstrong of Oak Hill, Richard of Gallia and John of Columbus.
     Mr. Oney was a veteran of the Civil War, serving two enlistments. He enlisted in Company A, 56th O. V. I., in 1861, and enlisted a second time in the same company and served until the close of the war.
     He united with the Gallia Baptist Church at the age of 18 years and sustained this relation
until his death, making 69 years of continuous membership with the organization. This long period was marked by faithful devotion to the cause which has rarely been excelled. His home during his last sickness was like a waiting room connecting with the mansions above.
     Funeral services were conducted at the Gallia Baptist Church by Rev. R. R. Denney, interment in the church cemetery by Undertaker Kinnison.

The Gallia Times
Thursday, March 9, 1922
Transcribed by Sandy L. Milliron                                                                      Top of Page


Pane, Mathew (Payne, Mathew)

Resolutions of Respect
On the death of comrade, Mathew Pane, late a private of Co. I, 18th O. V. I., who departed this life February 28th, 1890, member of Amos Carter Post, No. 388, G. A. R., of Patriot, Ohio.
WHEREAS, By the orders of the Allwise Creator, who has called for our comrade to the rest and glories of the lands of eternity, therefore, be it.
RESOLVED, That while we bow in submission to Him who rules the universe, we realize that in his death the community has lost a worthy citizen, and the Post has lost a worthy member.
RESOLVED, That we as comrades, will ever try to emulate the many virtues of our comrade who has suffered affliction and pain for many years and who bore them with patience to the end.
RESOLVED, That we extend our heartfelt sympathy to the bereaved family of our beloved comrade; we commend them to Him who is a friend to the widow and a Father to the orphan.
RESOLVED, That a copy of these resolutions be forwarded to the family of our deceased comrade, and that a copy of the same be presented to each of our county papers for publication; also, that the same be spread upon the journal of our Post.
RESOLVED, That our Hall be draped in mourning for thirty days.
By order of the Post.
DANIEL MILLER,
C. C. CHERRINGTON,
R. F. BOSTIC,
Committee.

[Note: Mathew Pane (Payne per stone) died February 28, 1890. His stone, bearing the notation of 1890 C, is located in Salem Baptist Cemetery, and confirms he died in 1890.]

Gallipolis Journal
April 2, 1890
Transcribed by Karen Strojin                                                                          Top of Page


Parent, Robert

Robert Parent
     Another old soldier has answered the roll call from on high. Robert Parent died at his residence in Gallipolis Thursday morning, May 19, 1892, at 8:00 o'clock, in the 50th year of his age. He had been an invalid for many years and endured great suffering--for the past four weeks being confined to his bed. He was a manufacturer of cigars, but for some years past, owing to his enfeebled condition, had been unable to work.       He was a native of Madison, Indiana. Our acquaintance with Mr. Parent extended over many years, beginning before he came to Gallipolis. He was an exemplary citizen, a kind husband and devoted father. In his long years of suffering he had the deep sympathy of all. He leaves a wife and four children to mourn for him and cherish his memory.
     The funeral services will be held to-morrow (Sunday) afternoon, at 2:00 o'clock, at his late home, conducted by Rev. R. Buell Love, under the direction of Cadot Post, G. A. R. The members of the Post are requested to meet at their Hall at 1:00 o'clock P. M., sharp.

Gallipolis Bulletin
May 21, 1892

Parent, Robert

Death of Robert Parent
      Mr. Robert Parent, manufacturer of cigars, died at his home in this city this (Thursday) morning, May 19, 1892 at about eight o'clock, leaving a wife and two sons and two daughters to mourn their loss. Mr. Parent had been an invalid and unable to labor for the past several years. His disease was diabetis [sic].
      He was an old Union Soldier, having belonged to an Indiana regiment and his funeral services will be conducted by Rev. R. Buell Love at his late home, Sunday afternoon, at two o'clock, under the auspices of Cadot Post G. A. R. The members of the Post are requested to meet at the G. A. R. hall Sunday afternoon at one o'clock. We had but little acquaintance with Mr. Parent but he had the reputation of being a good citizen, industrious and kind to his family, and he has had the sympathy of the community in his long and painful suffering, as will his family in losing their friend and protector.

[Note: Robert Parent served in Unit Co. C, 4th, In. I. His stone is located in Pine Street Cemetery.]

Gallipolis Journal
May 25, 1892
Transcriptions by Karen Strojin                                                                       Top of Page


Parker, Dr. E. W.

Sudden Death Of Prominent Gallipolis Citizen
Dr. E. W. Parker Dies of Heart Trouble
     Dr. E. W. Parker died at his home on Second Avenue Friday, June 12, 1903, at 4:30 a. m. Dr. Parker had been in failing health for several months. He had had slight trouble with his heart some years ago and last fall his condition became serious. The trouble augmented during the winter and spring and for a week before his death he was worse than usual though no one had any thought that it would prove fatal. Though he knew that his span of life was short at the best, he maintained his usual genial manner and gave no sign of melancholy.
     Dr. Parker was born in Porter in 1850, and was a son of S. M. Parker, a merchant. While attending Porter Academy the civil war broke out and he entered the U. S. service though only 12 years of age. After the war he again attended the Academy and became a teacher, becoming Principal of the school at the age of 17 years. During his term here he commenced the study of medicine under the tutorage of Dr. Perin Gardener and afterward attended the Ohio Medical College of Cincinnati from which he graduated when he was only 21 years of age. He was connected with the Union Central Life Insurance Company for awhile and afterwards [sic] practiced his profession at his old home with Dr. Gardener.
     He was married to Miss Mary L. Bradbury, daughter of Alonzo Bradbury, of Kygerville, on June 4, 1873, and two children, Dr. Claude B. Parker and Mrs. Garnet Parker-Erwin, were the fruit of this union.
     He afterward practiced at Pomeroy, Rutland and Vinton for twelve years and served as Assistant Physician at Central Insane Hospital at Columbus, coming from that place to this city, where he had since resided. He had been a member of the Gallia County Pension Board for several years and was President of the Board at the time of his death.
     Dr. Parker was regarded by many as the leader of his profession in this county and enjoyed a large practice. He had a big heart and a broad mind and we know of many instances where he gave his services when he knew that he would never receive compensation. It was enough that some one was suffering whom he could help.
     He was always prominent in politics and was one of the shrewdest leaders of his party. He was always open and aggressive in political matters and one always knew where to place him. He despised a hypocrite and the immoral found no favor with him.
     He was an energetic worker in fraternal matters and through his offices the local lodges with which he was affiliated received many new members. He was a member of the Masons and Knights of Pythias. His home relations were ideal. His affection for his family was strong and pure, their comfort his chief concern. His death is a terrible blow to his family and a distinct loss to the community. Besides his wife and children he leaves brothers C. G., S. M., and L. C., and one sister, Mrs. A. D. Gates of Charleston.
     The funeral services were held at the late residence Sunday noon by Rev. L. L. Magee of Grace M. E. Church, of which Dr. Parker was a member, in the presence of a large assemblage, many of whom were from his old home at Porter. The services were under the auspices of the Masons. The pall bearers were: Judge J. C. Ingels, Auditor J. T. Hanson, Sheriff Wm. McDaniel, Chas D. Kerr, F. Ross Williams, C. W. Kerr, A. L. Roadamour and T. E. Bradbury. The flower escort were: Chas C. Cadot, Herbert Vanden, Dr. Harry Allen and S. J. Kerr.
     A large cortege, one of the largest ever seen in this city, accompanied the remains to their last resting place in Mound Hill Cemetery, where the Masons performed their last sad rites.
A good man has gone and we who were his friends mourn with sincere sorrow. To his relatives he left the priceless heritage of an honorable, upright, stainless life, and their sorrow is alleviated by the thought that "He who doeth all things well" has rewarded him in the world beyond the grave.

[Note: Per family stone for Dr. E. W. Parker, located in Mound Hill Cemetery, he was born in 1850 and died June 12, 1903.]

Gallipolis Bulletin
Friday, June 19, 1903
Transcribed by Karen Strojin                                                                          Top of Page


Parker, John A./James A.

     John Parker has a tombstone in Pine Street Cemetery but in the Roster he is referred to as James A. He was born in 1845 and died March 10, 1864. He served in Co. F, 23rd Ohio Volunteer Infantry. He enlisted February 29, 1864 and died within 11 days of service.

Created obit from service record and tombstone
1864
Created by Henny Evans


Parmley, George

George Parmley
Aged Farmer and Merchant Dead at Bladen
     W.G. Parmley, aged 84, well known Bladen resident, died Saturday morning, August 23, 1919, of heart trouble. He was a prominent merchant there for many years and was known throughout Gallia county.
His widow alone survives, one daughter dying some years ago.
     The funeral was held Monday morning from Mt. Zion church with the burial at the church cemetery by Stevers. Mr. Parmley was a brother-in-law of the late Capt. Chas. R. Small.

[Note: He served as a Squirrel Hunter.]

Gallipolis Daily Tribune
August 25, 1919
Transcribed by Henny Evans


Parry, Evan D.

Died at Athens
     Evan D. Parry of Centerpoint, who was committed to the Athens asylum, a year ago, died there Saturday morning. The funeral was held at Nebo Tuesday.

[Note: Evan D. Parry served in Unit Co. H, 60th, O. V. I. He was born in 1840 and died 1913.]

Gallipolis Bulletin
June 5, 1913
Transcribed by Karen Strojin


Parson, Andrew Jackson

Death of A.J. Parson
     Andrew Jackson Parsons passed away Thursday evening Dec. 24, 1915 at the home of his son, Charles R., on Vine Street.
     He was 78 years old and was a son of George W. and Nancy Parsons. He is survived by his son Charles R. of Gallipolis; brother, William and sister, Mrs. Russell of Coal River, WV.
     Most of his life was spent in this city as a cooper and later as a teamster. He was a good industrious citizen and worked steadily until compelled to retire by illness a couple of months ago.
     The funeral services were conducted Sunday afternoon at the home on Vine Street by Rev. Hugh Evans of the Presbyterian Church. The remains were laid to rest in the Mound Hill Cemetry by undertaker Hayward.

[Note: Co D, 91st O.V.I.]

Gallipolis Bulletin
Dec. 30, 1915 No. 52, P 1
Transcribed by F.K. Brown                                                                             Top of Page


Peck, Andrew J.

OBITUARY
     Andrew J. Peck, son of Samuel and Emily Peck, was born March 26, 1842, in Meigs County, Ohio. He was married to Susan E. Riggs Dec. 1865, at New Haven, W. Va. To this union were born seven children, Deborah J. Stone, Everetta May Ormston, Susan Anna Graham, Ella Blanche Ohlinger, Hobert Andrew Peck, Wilber W. Peck, and Emma Augusta Peck, all living except Emma. His wife Susan E., died Nov. 27, 1903, at Hartford, W. Va.
     He was united in marriage to Mary E. Scott Sept. 15, 1904, at Gallipolis, Ohio. His wife, Mary E., and Walter W. Scott, and daughter Maud Fulton, his six children, a number of grandchildren and a host of friends are left to mourn his loss.
     Mr. Peck served 4 1/2 years in the Civil War, serving in the Second West Virginia Cavalry. He joined the Methodist Episcopal Church at New Haven, W. Va., in 1866. After coming to Gallia County he joined the Campaign Free Baptist Church and was ordained as a Baptist minister. He always did his duty in the church and Sunday School. He was a kind father and husband, and a good citizen. His going will be deeply felt by his relatives and many friends.
     The funeral was held at the church Thursday forenoon, service conducted by Rev. W. J. Fulton, burial by DeMaine of Middleport.

[Note: Andrew J. Peck served in Unit Co. A, 2nd, Wv. C. His stone is located in Campaign Cemetery.]

The Gallia Times
January 16, 1921
Transcribed by Karen Strojin


Peden, Henry Draper

     Henry was born in Ewington, Gallia County January 12, 1841 to John and Elizabeth Ewing Peden. He enlisted along with his brother John in Co. B, 36th Ohio Volunteer Infantry. Both he and John were wounded at the Battle of Lookout Mountain on November 25, 1863.
     He maried Mary Ellen Johnson in 1864 while home on leave from his injuries. He rejoined his unit a week later. After his first term was up he re-enlisted in Co. B, 34th Ohio Volunteer Infantry but was transferred back to the 36th.
     The family went west to Kansas, Washington and Idaho. He died November 11, 1908 but it is not certain where. However, he has a tombstone in Garfield Cemetery, Whitman County, Washington.

Created obit from Ewing family research of Nancy Hank Ewing and war records
November 1908
Created by Henny Evans


Peden, John J.

J. J. Peden
     John J. Peden was born in Gallia county, Ohio, Dec. 16, 1840, and died at the home of his son Henry here Apr. 5, 1921.
     At the outbreak of the Civil War he enlisted in Co. B, 36 O.V.I., and was wounded several times. Dec. 16, 1866 he was united in marriage to Miss Margaret Hawk of Vinton county, Ohio, and to them were born six children, three of whom--Mrs. Stella Abbott, Henry F. and Holly--remain to console the stricken mother. About the same time he united with the Baptist Church, and as a school teacher and exhorter he did much to spread intelligence and right living. Coming to Jackson county in 1874 he settled on Beatys Run--the first settler here--and it was his home ever since.
     Stricken with years, about two weeks ago he came to his son's for better treatment, but the end was near, the top of the long hill had been reached and life's struggles were over. The burial will be today at 2 o'clock with the ritualisitc rites of the G.A.R. and a benediction by Rev. J. E.Hutchinson.
     It is the lives of such men that are the foundation of civilization.

The Ravenswood News
Apr. 5, 1921
Contributed by Kathy Peden Swift                                                                       Top of Page


Peden, Samuel Jackson

     Samuel was born near Ewington, Gallia County on June 2, 1834. In his teens he received a severe injury to his foot while chopping a big log. He was not able to enlist for this reason but instead was able to help guard the home front as a member of the militia during the war.
     He married Margaret Butts in 1861. Near the end of the war they moved to Iowa and completed their family with six children. About 1902 they moved on to Davison County, South Dakota. In 1909 they moved again to Huron, South Dakota where Samuel died August 27, 1909. He was buried in the IOOF Cemetery in Huron, Beadle County,
South Dakota.

Created obit from Ewing family research of Nancy Hank Ewing
August 1909
Created by Henny Evans


Peden, Thomas Ewing, D.D.

     The messenger of death has again visited our town and taken from us one of our most prominent and well beloved citizens, Thomas Ewing Peden.
     The subject of this sketch was born in Ewington, Gallia County, Sept 13,1832. His parents were John and Elizabeth Peden. About fifty-six years ago he was happily married to Miss Louisa Martin of his native state. She survives him after their long and useful pilgrimage together. He also leaves four brothers in the great West: Jackson, Jordan, Henry and Jonathon; two sisters: Miranda and Elizabeth. He is also survived by one aunt; Mrs. Leonard at Fostoria, Ohio.
     It was a wonderful shock to our community on Monday morning last when the news flashed over the town that Dr Peden was dead at his home on West Railroad Street. The summons came to him at nine o’clock. He had been feeble for several days, but none supposed him so near the end of his mortal existence.
     After all his great travels he died quietly in his home in his chair, in the presence of his faithful wife and Miss Lillian Munn, who has been with the aged couple for many years.
     Dr Peden was a man of marked ability, far above the average in many respects. In his early manhood he exhibited those traits of energy and aggressiveness that ever after characterized his manly useful life. He took high rank in his classes at school and came out with distinguished honors.   
     At the early age of seventeen he gave his heart to the Lord, and from that time on it has been his chief joy to give his best service to the King of king’s and Lord of lords. He was a union soldier (173rd OH) and served his country with honor, courage and bravery till released. As a citizen he always stood firm and unyielding for the right as he saw it. He hated sin and iniquity in every form. As an advocate of temperance and good government he was always in the forefront of the battle and never relaxed his energy till the battle was won.
     His greatest work in our midst was as principal of the Seminary here. Heaven alone will reveal the results of his mighty work for the good of humanity. Besides the hosts he has led to Christ, he has been instrumental in God’s hands in aiding many young men who had entered the Gospel ministry to be more efficient and know the way of life more perfectly.
     For a long time he was an honored member of the Masonic fraternity and took great delight in the meetings of the brotherhood.
     There was a universal gathering of our people at the funeral which was conducted from the home by Rev. Burgess of the A E Church, Rev Le Grande of the Christian and E.T. Phillips of the Free Will Baptist. After the services at the home, the remains were taken in hand by the members of the Masonic Lodge, conveyed to the Cemetery and laid to rest with the beautiful and appropriate rites of the order. An impressive scene was the procession of the faculty and students of the Seminary that marched in file to the cemetery following the masons. The floral tributes were exceedingly beautiful one each being presented by the Masonic Order, the faculty of the Seminary and the students. Thus this noble man of God was laid to rest in our town cemetery. His aged companion and numerous friends viewing the last sad rites.
     His life will live in the hearts of many he has led to the King. The Master will say to him “well done”. Heavens gates will admit him, and a glorious crown will be his eternally. God comfort the bereft and may we all meet him in heaven.

Unknown publication
Contributed by Kathy Peden Swift
Editor’s note: Died in Ayden NC 2-3-1913                                                       Top of Page


Pfeiffer, John

Well Known German Citizen, John Pfeiffer, Died Friday of Pneumonia
     John Pfeiffer, one of the best known and most highly respected German citizens of this city, died last Friday at 4 o'clock P. M. from an attack of pneumonia. He was 76 years and 10 days old, and was born in Germany, Jan. 1st, 1837. He came to this country in 1861, locating at Marietta, where he was married. In 1879 he moved to this city and followed his trade as a tanner in the Ufferman tannery for many years.
     Mr. Pfeiffer was a soldier, serving in Co. B. 39th O. V. I. and was with Sherman on his march through Georgia, and was a member of Cadot Post G. A. R. He is survived by his wife and three sons, William S. of Roulette, Pa., and Henry and Fred at home.
     The funeral services were held at the family residence yesterday afternoon, conducted by Rev. Hugh Evans of the First Presbyterian church. Burial at Mound Hill by Wetherholt.

[Note: Per stone, located in Mound Hill Cemetery, he was born January 1, 1837, and died 1913.]

Gallipolis Journal
Wednesday, January 15, 1913
Transcribed by Karen Strojin

Pfieffer, John

John Pfeiffer Dead
Aged and Respected German Citizen Passes at 78
     Mr. John Pfeiffer, living on Portsmouth ave., mentioned yesterday as being very low with pneumonia and heart trouble died Friday, Jan. 10, 1913 at 4 p.m. The funeral will be Monday or later. Wetherholt has charge of the burial and at Mound Hill. Mr. P. was 76 years old Jan. 1. He is survived by wife and three sons. They were the parents of 7 children. They came from Germany, he and wife, in 1861. He was a tanner and came here in 1879 and worked for Mr. A. Ufferman.
     He and wife were members of the German Lutheran Church at Marietta. He was a highly respected old gentleman. Henry is a son at home, Wm. S. lives at Roulette, Pa., and Fred at Ironton, will be here today. He was a member of the 39th O. V., and marched with Sherman to the sea, and was a member of Cadot Post G. A. R.

Gallipolis Tribune
Saturday, January 11, 1913
Transcribed by Sandy L. Milliron


Phillips, J. Richard

Taps Sound
For J. R. Phillips, Well Known Old Soldier of Harris
     J. Richard Phillips, popularly known as Dick Phillips, died very suddenly of heart trouble at his house near Harris in Raccoon Tp. early Tuesday afternoon. It was known that he suffered from heart trouble, but his death was unexpected and the news of his sudden passing came as a shock to all, causing general and genuine regret.
     Mr. Phillips was born Jan. 17, 1844, in Addison Tp., later lived near Vinton, and the past 18 years was a resident of Harris. Big, jolly, companionable he had acquired a host of warm friends. He is survived by his wife, who is a daughter of Lewis Kent; three sons Menzi, of Vinton, Edward, living on the Vaughn farm in Raccoon, and Nelson, at home; two daughters, Mrs. Charles Davis, of Raccoon, and Lola, at home; two sisters, Mrs. Nelson Kerns, of this city, and Mrs. A. A. Clark, of Bidwell, and one brother, James, living in Colorado.
     When 18 years old Mr. Phillips enlisted in Co. G 23rd O. V. I., at Cleveland, and served his country as a soldier till the close of the war.
The funeral services were held at the Baptist church of Harris, of which he was a member, at 10 o'clock yesterday. Burial at Rio Grande.

[Note: J. Richard Phillips served in Unit Co. D, or G, 23rd, O. V. I. Per Death Records Vol. II, he died March 15, 1915. His stone is located in Calvary Baptist Cemetery.]

Gallipolis Journal
March 19, 1915
Transcribed by Karen Strojin                                                                          Top of Page


Pickens, Andrew (William Andrew Jackson)

Andrew Pickens Dead
     Andrew Pickens, who made his home with his daughter, Mrs. Howard Shaner of 116 Locust St., died Friday morning from at [sic] attack of cerebral appoplexy [sic], with which he was stricken Wednesday morning. He was 69 years, 8 months and 17 days old and served in the civil war in the 91st O. V. I., Company B. He is survived by one daughter, Mrs. Shaner and four sons, George of this city, Ben of Pomeroy, Bart of Cincinnati and William of London, O. All the children were here for the funeral.
     The funeral services were held at Mrs. Shaner's residence at nine o'clock Sunday morning by Rev. J. O. Newton. Burial at the Lewis family cemetery in Harrison Tp. by Wetherholt.

Gallipolis Journal
December 25, 1912

Pickens, William Andrew Jackson

Wm. Pickens Dead
     William Andrew Jackson Pickens, making his home with his son-in-law and daughter, Mr. and Mrs. Howard Shaner, on Locust Street, Extension, died Friday morning, December 20, 1912, about 8 o'clock from paralysis. The funeral was held at the house Sunday, the burial by Wetherholt, following at the Lewis family cemetery in Harrison township. He was a soldier of the Civil War and a good citizen. Several children of adult age survive.

[Note: From his stone and the Roster of Ohio Soldiers, William Andrew Jackson Pickens served in Unit Co. B, 193rd, O. V. I. (per obituary, Co. B, 91st, O. V. I.) Per Death Records Vol. II, he was born April 3, 1843 and died December 19, 1912.]

Gallipolis Bulletin
December 26, 1912
Transcriptions by Karen Strojin


Pierce, Aaron

     Mr. Aaron Pierce living near the old Wirt Fisher place on Mill Creek, died this morning, May 9, 1909, at 5 o'clock of old age and other infirmities, being past 80 years old. He is survived by four adult children---Mrs. Emmett Hurn, John Pierce at home, William at Wellsville and Wesley of Marion county.
     The funeral services will be Sunday afternoon at 2 o'clock by Rev. Mr. Thomas of Cheshire circuit and burial by Hicks, at the Rife
cemetery.

[Note: He served as a Squirrel Hunter.]

Gallipols Daily Tribune
May 8, 1909
Transcribed by Henny Evans


Pierce, William

     William Pierce was born about 1841 and enlisted October 9, 1861 in Co. I, 44th Ohio Volunteer Infantry. He died of disease in Gallipolis September 12, 1862 and is buried in Pine Street Cemetery in Gallipolis.

Created obit from Roster and Grave Regsitration Card.
1862
Transcribed by Henny Evans


Pillow, William J.

Civl War Veteran, Former Resident Here, Dies
Burial Monday in Mound Hill Cemetery
     The body of the late William J. Pillow, 83, Civil War Veteran and former resident of Gallipolis, was brought here from Delaware where he died last Friday, and burial was in Mound Hill Cemetery here
Monday afternoon at 2 o'clock in charge of George J. Wetherholt and Sons. A funeral service was read at the grave by Rev. A. H. Beardsley of Grace M. E. Church.
     Mr. Pillow died following an attack of pneumonia which came as he was visiting his son William T. Pillow near Delaware. He had lived until recently in Columbus and formerly had resided in Chillicothe and Point Pleasant, West Virginia.
     The body was accompanied here by four of his children Mrs. C. W. Lawson, Columbus, Mrs. Rufus Marsluff, Chillicothe, Mrs. Anne Best, Cleves, J. R. Pillow, Delaware and W. T. Pillow, Galena. Another son, Charles H. Pillow of Millersport, could not be located.
     Following is an account of Mr. Pillow's death published by the Delaware Gazette:
Mr. William J. Pillow.
     Mr. William J. Pillow died at 12:40 Friday afternoon at the home of his spn William T. Pillow in Harlem Township following a brief illness.
     He was born in Campbell County, Virginia and was 83 years of age and had made his home in Columbus till recently.
     Mr. Pillow served in Company B, 13 Regiment, West Virginia Infantry, during the Civil War and was also a member of the G. A. R. Post at Gallipolis.
     Surviving are three daughters, Mrs. Annie Best, Cleves, Ohio, Mrs. Sarah Marsluff, Chillicothe, Mrs. Kittie Lawson, 117 East Rich Street, Columbus. Three sons Charles Pillow, Hebron, Ohio, William T. Pillow, Galena, Ohio, and James H. Pillow, 119 North Union Street, Delaware.
     The remains now lie in state at the Clevinger Funeral Home and funeral announcements will be made later.

Gallipolis Tribune
Volume LVII
Number 50
December 13, 1928
Gallipolis, Ohio

Transcribed By: MLT                                                                                      Top of Page


Plymale, June (Junis)

Prominent Farmer Dies
     Mr. June Plymale died Monday morning at eight o'clock at his home in Yellowtown, after an illness of several weeks. He was the son of Mr. and Mrs. Hugh Plymale born August 3, 1841. He was a soldier in the War of the Rebellion where he received a gunshot wound, which caused an abcess [sic] and resulted in his death.
     Mr. Plymale was a prominent farmer and miller and well known in this section of the country. He leaves to mourn his death a wife and seven children: four daughters, Misses Naomi and Beatrice Plymale, Mrs. Charles King, Mrs. Odel Ronfelter, and three sons, Thomas, Glenn and Charles of this county.
The funeral services were conducted by Rev. Massie at Yellowtown Chapel, Wednesday at ten o'clock.

[Note: June Plymale (Junis Plymale per stone) served in Unit Co. K, 40th, In. O. V. I. Per family stone, located in St. Nick Cemetery, he died December 16, 1907.]

Gallipolis Bulletin
December 20, 1907
Transcribed by Karen Strojin


Poindexter, David

Civil War Veteran Found Dead In Bed
     David Poindexter, aged citizen of Addison was found dead in bed early Saturday morning by his wife. Mr. Poindexter, who was eighty three years old, was one of the few remaining Civil War Veterans in the County. He had been in failing health the past year. Mr. Poindexter was born in Pomeroy but lived most of life in this County. In addition to the widow three children survive, Charles (Doc) of Middleport, Nellie, of Columbus and James, a farmer on the Mill Creek Road. He also leaves two sisters, Mrs. Mary Deal, of Pomeroy and Mrs. James Marsh of Addison. Arrangements for the funeral, which will be in charge of Wetherholt and Entsminger had not been made at this time.

[Note: Squirrel Hunter]

Gallipolis Tribune
Volume LVII
Number 44
November 1, 1928
Gallipolis, Ohio

Transcribed By: MLT                                                                                      Top of Page


Pope, Henry August

     Henry Pope was born in Germany Aug. 25, 1844 and died at his farm home on Maine Prairie Sunday January 21st at the age of 79 years 4 months and 26 days. Mr. Pope came to this country with his parents when he was seven years old. The family settled first in South Eastern, Ohio where (he) grew to manhood.
It was from Ohio, when he was eighteen years of age, he enlisted for service in the civil war and served
through that conflict.
     About the time of closing of the war Aug. 3, 1865 he was united in marriage with Eliza Boggs; from this
union there [sic] nine children: Lewis and May who died in infancy, Ross who died at the age of 28 and Louise
dying at 37. Five children survive their father: Gus of Tolley N.D., Mrs. Sara Knower of Coulee, N.D., Mrs. Jos.
Zeller of Hillman, Minn., and Clifford and Henry of Maine Prairie also 10 grand children. The mother died some
years ago.
     Mr. Pope was among the earlier settlers of this part of Minnesota, driving through from Ohio with some
others. He made the trip with a pair of Morgan horses the team weighing but little more than two thousand
pounds. Those sturdy pioneers who early into our country suffered many hardships. Now they are mostly gone.  Those of us who remain and are younger owe to them a debt of gratitude that we ought to be quick to acknowledge but which we oftimes do not appreciate.
     Funeral services were held at the home in the afternoon of January 23, Dr. Ray of the Christian church
of Kimball conducting the service and burial was in Maine Prairie cemetery, The Frederick Metcalf Post of the
American Legion attended the funeral in a body and conducted the services at the grave. Mr. Pope had been for more than 30 years a member of the Sons of Herman of St. Cloud. The lodge sent a very appropriate floral offering but owing to the condition of the road did not attend the funeral in a body but sent an official representative.

[Note: He served in Co. E, 36th Ohio Volunteer Infantry and then in Co. B, 173rd Ohio Volunteer Infantry.
Kimball is located in Maine Prairie Township in Stearns County, Minnesota.]

Minnesota Paper
January 1923
Transcribed by Henny Evans


Pope, Little Asbury

     Little A. Pope, 77, a veteran of the Civil war, died of uraemic poisoning Friday morning at the home of his daughter, Mrs. Grace Goings, 1113 N. Isabella St. He been visiting at the home of his daughter for the last two weeks, coming here from the National Military Home at Dayton. He had been in failing health since that time. Mr. Pope had lived at the home in Dayton for three years. Prior to that he have lived in Springfield for 17 years. He was a farmer, but had not been actively engaged for about five years.
     He is survived by his wife, Mrs. Mary J. Pope and the following children: Jesse M., Edward E., Pearl L., Mrs. Goings, Mrs. Clara B. Leffel and Mrs. Evelyn Alexander, all of Springfield; Frank M., of Columbus, and Mrs. Battie Sater of Marion.

[Note: He served in Co. D, 179th Ohio Volunteer Infantry. He is buried in Ferncliff Cemetery, Springfield, Clark County, Ohio, 1845-1922.]

Springfield Daily News
November 3, 1922
Transcribed by Henny Evans


Porter, Daniel

Death of Daniel Porter
     Mr. Daniel Porter, of Samples Landing, an old Pioneer resident of the County age 73 years, died at his home at 11 o'clock Wednesday, May 5th,'97. He left a second wife and ten living children, two by his first wife, of whom Mr. J. Sherman Porter, of the Gallipolis Public Schools, is one. He was honest, honorable, kindly hearted good old man, whose death will be regretted by many.  He was a soldier of the Union and belonged to Captain E. S. Aleshire's 2nd Ohio Heavy Artillery. His disease was inflamation of the bowels, and he had been confined to his home for the last six to eight weeks.

Gallipolis Daily Tribune
Volume XII
Number 107
May 6, 1897
Gallipolis, Ohio

Transcribed By: MLT


Porter, Daniel

     Daniel Porter, died at his home near Bladen yesterday afternoon, aged 73 years. Mr. Porter was one of the best known citizens of his neighborhood and to every steamboat man he was familiarly known and universally esteemed. He spent his life in the coal business at Samples Landing, and while he never accumulated much of this world's goods, yet he alwaysa held the affections of his acquaintances, being ever ready to deny himself that he might accomodate his neighbors. Everybody has a good word for "Uncle Dan," as he was familiarly called, and his funeral which took place at Bethel last Thursday afternoon at 3 o'clock, was one of the largest ever seen at that place.
     Deceased was a member of the 2nd O.V.H.A., enlisting under Captain Aleshire, of this city, and serving with honor. His son, J.S. Porter, of this city, was with hiim in his last sickness.

[Note: Daniel is buried in the Bethel Cemetery in Ohio Twp. His date of death was May 5, 1897.]

Gallipolis Journal
May 11, 1897
Transcribed by Henny Evans                                                                           Top of Page


Porter, John Clinton

Death of Capt. Porter
Ex-Sheriff of Mason County and Veteran of the Rebellion
     The death of Capt. John C. Porter, though coming after he had ripened to an age accorded to few, will come as a shock to a large number of residents of Harrison township. His relatives in that township are many and more or less conspicious as prosperous farmers.
     It was notable that he should move to Mason county and become its sheriff, an office of great local importance, because of its extended single term and the collection of taxes, which belongs to the office. He was a kindly man, energetic, bright and prosperous.
     Many, many times was the Captain a visitor to the Journal office 35 years ago. His second wife was a Gallipolis lady and the mother of Chas. W. Leaper, Mrs. Fred Kuhn and Mrs. Robt. Neale. She was the aunt, also, of Mrs. Virgil Beare, Charles F. Johnson and Mrs. Meridith Donnally.
     John Clinton Porter, son of Thomas Jefferson and Ellen Dewitt Porter, was born in Harrison Tp., Gallia Co., Oct. 23, 1829, and died April 19th, aged 84 yrs., 5 months and 12 days. He was married to Mary Margaret Dewitt in 1850. To them were born three sons and three daughters, namely, Alcie Brown and Lilla Wallace, deceased, and Josephine Wallace of Glenwood, W., Va., and Wm. Porter in the west, Edgar and Ronzo, deceased. His first wife died in 1870.
     In July, 1872, he was married to Mrs. Lucinda Leaper and to them were born one daughter, Mrs. Clarence P. Stout, and one son, Harry G. Porter of Ben Lomond, W.Va. The second wife died April 26, 1913.
     He was elected sheriff of Mason county, W.Va., and served in many other positions of trust and was faithful in all his official capacities. He volunteered and served as Lieutentant and was appointed and mustered out at as Captain of Co. G, 195th O.V. Infantry in the great rebellion.
     He leaves two sons and two daughters, 12 grandchildren and a host of friends and relatives to mourn his loss.

Gallipolis Journal
April 24, 1914
Transcribed by Henny Evans


Poston, Richard J.

     Richard Poston was born in Hampshire County, Virginia September 13, 1835 to Ashford and Mary
(McVickar) Poston. He was ordained to the ministry in 1852 and spent ten years teaching school, then ten years as pastor of churches in Ohio. He also assisted in the establisment of the Cheshire Academy and was at one time a trustee of Rio Grande College. In 1860 in Gallia County he married Mary Swisher. They had Elmer E., Charles B., Frank W. and Jessie M.
     He enlisted in July 1862 in the 96th Illinois Volunteer Infantry and served through the war. In 1879 he settled in Mason County, West Virginia. He later moved West and died March 18, 1915 and is buried in Oakdale Memorial Park, Los Angeles County, California.

Created from information found in Mason County's Hardesty History
March 1915
Created by Henny Evans


Powell, David

David Powell Dead
    
David Powell passed away at his home near Kerr's in Springfield township Wednesday, Feb. 11, 1920.
He was born near Steubenville in 1847, and grew to manhood in Middleport, where he married Miss Martha covert.
     His wife and two children, Mrs. Lois B. Powell Thomas of Cheshire and Otho M. Powell of Kerr, survive him.
Mr. Powell was a member of the Sweedenborg Church, a veteran of the Civil War and a very fine man.
     Funeral was at his late home Thursday by Rev. Y.H. Reed of Cheshire, interment following in Gravel Hill cemetery.

Gallia Times
February 22, 1920
Transcribed by Henny Evans                                                                          Top of Page


Pritchett, John W.

MEMIOR
Wounded at Cloyd Mountain May 9th, 1864 and died May 11th in the rebel Hospital, John W. Pritchett, age 28 years
     Such love for the starry banner, as only throbs in the bosom of a true patriot, was implanted in his breast. When our flag was so grossly insulted at Fort Sumter, he determined to take up and never lay down arms, until peace once more wreathed her bright chain over the entire land. His first enlistment was in the Spring of 1861, under Captain C. C. Aleshire, three months men, at the expiration of which term he was discharged, and soon after enlisted under Captain Taylor, in the three years service, and in the Spring of 1864 he re-enlisted in the same regiment, 36th, feeling that as a veteran he could perform more difficult duty than a new recruit.
     During his connection with the 36th, he was in the following engagements, Antietem, South Mountain, Lewisburg, Mission Ridge, Snicker's Gap, Big Springs and numerous others. Through all those hard conflicts he came out unscathed. After becoming veteranized he was in but the one battle at which he received the wound from which he died, "as die the brave who sink to rest." He was truly a good soldier, never flinching from the path of duty which he was religiously trained from a child, was a lover of the Bible and the course of religion. Although exposed to the many snares, which ever surrounded the camp, the duty of reading his Bible was not neglected. He remarked it as his belief, that had we more praying, the war would sooner cease. But now he dwells where clashing of arms can never come, where bloodshed is not known, far away, where friendship's tear cannot enter his resting place (where) he is laid in sweet repose, but guardian angels watch his precious dust, and will bear love's message to the spirit of the brave. Upon the green turf that covers his form, the flowers of memory and affection will ever bloom. Of his bravery and patriotism we are proud. Yet the silent tear will fall when called to mourn "the loved and lost." He who gave him, called his spirit hence. We bow before his dark decree, and say, "Thy holy will be done" for God see'st not as man see'st.

"His rest is with the fallen great,
The sons of earthly pride,
Where hundreds in their last cold state,
Are slumbering at his side.
      Romie, Pleasant View, Ohio

[Note: Not buried here?]

Gallipolis Journal
June 8, 1864
Transcribed by Maxine Marshall                                                                       Top of Page


Pritchett, Peter

Peter Pritchett Dead
     Peter B. Pritchett, mention of whose hopeless illness was made in last week's Bulletin, died last Thursday morning at the home of his sister-in-law, Miss Ann Clark, on lower Fourth avenue. Mr. Pritchett was born in Clay Tp. in a log house still standing on a hill back of the junction of Raccoon Creek and the Ohio River, and was 79 years and 3 months old. His parents were Hiram and Maria Blazer Pritchett.
     Mr. Pritchett was a cabinet maker by trade, having been employed for several years in the old Fuller-Hutsinpiller factory. He served as fire chief for the city of Gallipolis for 25 years and was presented with a very fine gold watch by the city for faithful service. He was also a township trustee for 18 years.
     He leaves to mourn their loss four sons, Claude of Dayton, Lew and Earl of Columbus and Guy of Toledo, and daughters, Mrs. Burt France of this city, Mrs. C. F. Johnson of Columbus, and Mrs J. S. Billups of Chillicothe. He also leaves one brother, Silas S. Pritchett of the Sandusky Soldiers' Home, and one sister, Mrs. T. B. Gilmore of Huntington.
     Mr. Pritchett served during the Civil War under Capt. Caleb Cherrington in the 193rd O. V. I.
For the past three years Mr. Pritchett has resided at the Soldiers' Home in Dayton. He came here on July 7 to make a visit and was stricken with apoplexy Friday July 18.
     The funeral was held at the Clark residence Sunday afternoon in charge of the Knights of Pythias, the decedent being a charter member and the oldest member of Naomi Lodge, Rev. D. Finley Wood officiated. Burial at Mound Hill by George Wetherholt.

[Note: Per his stone, located in Mound Hill Cemetery, Peter Pritchett was born in 1840 and died in 1919.]

Gallipolis Bulletin
July 21, 1919
Transcribed by Karen Strojin


Pritchett, Silas S.

Aged War Veteran Dies at Soldiers Home
     Silas S. Pritchett, aged 81, a veteran of the Civil War and a native of Gallia County, died at
the Soldiers Home in Sandusky Sunday night, according to word received here.
     The remains will arrive Wednesday at noon over the Hocking Valley and will be taken directly to Mound Hill cemetery where burial will be made under the auspices of the Knights of Pythias by Wetherholt and Entsminger.
     Surviving Mr. Pritchett, besides a host of old friends, are three children Mrs. George Billups
of Columbus, Mr. Pete Pritchett of Washington, D.C., and Mr. Oliver Pritchett of Charleston, West Virginia.

[Note: He served in Co. B, 91st Ohio Volunteer Infantry and was wounded at the battle of Opequon.]

Gallipolis Daily Tribune
March 31, 1925
Transcribed by Henny Evans


Prose, William

     DIED - at Patriot, Gallia county, O. Aug. 6th, 1893, Mr. William Prose aged 73 years. Mr. Prose lived most of his life in Gallia county. He was peaceable, inoffensive and naturally of a kind disposition. He had lived a member of Salem Baptist church for many years, and was reconciled to depart. His funeral took place Aug. 8th, at Salem church. He was buried by the Masonic order, religious services conducted by D. S. Jones. He leaves a widow and ten children to mourn their loss, and a large circle of relatives and friends.

[Note: Served in 141st OVI in the Civil War]

Gallipolis Journal
August 16, 1893, page 5
Transcribed by Neil Elvick                                                                                Top of Page


Pyles, Henry Wilson

Old Soldier Called
     Henry Wilson Pyles, son of Francis and Susan Pyles, was born Nov. 18, 1844, in Lawrence county, and died June 5, 1917, in his 73rd year. He was left fatherless when less than two years of age, and his mother died in his 11th year. From that time until he was married to Sarah E. Fox in 1864, he made his home with an uncle, W. W. Wiseman.
     Mr. and Mrs. Pyles became the parents of five daughters and four sons, Jerusha, Eugene, Mrs. Sarah Herrell, Mrs. Martha Plybon, Mrs. Rebecca Neal, John, Emma, Lester and Austin. The last three named preceded him in death.
     During the civil war Mr. Pyles was a member of Co. B, 193rd O. V. I. Returning home he bought the farm on which he lived and died. He was a member of the Fairview Christian Church for half a century.
     The funeral services were conducted by Rev. John L. Porter, assisted by Rev. W. P. Myers at Fairview church, and the interment was in the cemetery there on Thursday, June 7.

The Gallia Times
June 13, 1917
Transcribed by Karen Strojin


Queen, Cornelius

In Memory
     Cornelius Queen was born Dec. 20, 1839, and departed this life July 6, 1920, aged 80 years, 7 months and 14 days. He was united in marriage March 8, 1866, to Louvisa Jane Gillian, who departed this life Sept. 23, 1916. To this union were born ten children, Henry of Ashville, N. C., Simeon of Bidwell, Clara McDaniel of Rodney, Minerva Grover of Bidwell, Flora Cherrington of New Straitsville, Albert of Columbus, Lucinda Hall of Tuscola, Ill., Floyd, whereabouts unknown and Osa Spissa of New York City. One son, Turchen, died in childhood. He was again united in marriage to Mrs. Magdalena Helrich Jan. 6, 1919.
     When 35 years of age he joined the M. E. Church at Bethesda and was a faithful member until his death. On April 22, 1861, he enlisted in the Civil War and served four years, during which time he was promoted to corporal. He was given an honorable discharge July 25, 1865. He was a devoted husband and a loving father, and bore his suffering with patience. While on his bed of affliction, he told his children that all was well with him and expressed a willingness to go. Besides his children and wife there remains to mourn his loss 17 grandchildren and many friends.

There is an hour of peaceful rest,
To mourning wanderers given;
There is a joy for souls distressed,
A balm for every wounded breast,
'Tis found above--in Heaven.

[Note: Cornelius Queen served in Unit Co. G, 1st, O. H. A. His stone is located in Fairview (Long) Cemetery.]

The Gallia Times
July 22, 1920
Transcribed by Karen Strojin                                                                          Top of Page


Queen, Jasper

From an article called "Letters from the Eighteenth. Nashville, Tennessee, Oct. 6, 1862."

     One young man named Queen, one of the heroes of the stockade fight at "Short Mountain Cross-roads," died last week. He had recovered from the severe wounds he had received and then died of the flux. He was from Gallia county and was a brave, good boy."

[Note: He served in Co. I, 18th Ohio Volunteer Infantry and is buried in the National Cemetery at Nashville, Tennessee. Born about 1842 and died September 27, 1862.]

Athens Messenger
October 30, 1862
Transcribed by Henny Evans


Quickle, George W.

G. W. Quickle
     Mr. George W. Quickle, a veteran of the civil war, died at his home near Ewington Wednesday of last week, aged about 66 years. He left a wife and four sons and two daughters. He was a nice old gentleman and was highly respected by all his neighbors. The funeral services were conducted Friday at Mt. Olive, interment by Butler & Sons of Vinton.

[Note: George W. Quickle served in Unit Co. A, 1st, O. H. A. He was born August 31, 1837 and died March 25, 1903.]

Gallipolis Bulletin
April 13, 1903
Transcribed by Karen Strojin